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CG's Artisan & Farmstead Cheese Threak - Page 11

post #151 of 243
Thread Starter 
Here's one for Ed...

Five-year Gouda

post #152 of 243
Thread Starter 
Rather boring cheese #1: Castelinhos



Rather boring cheese #2: Sunny Road Raw Cheddar

post #153 of 243
Thread Starter 
Flocked Ewe, Star Thrower Farm, Minnesota


post #154 of 243
So here's a potentially stupid question from me (for a change).

With pairing cheese with fruit or what have you, how do you eat the accompaniments? For me I have a weird need to compartmentalize the components of what I eat so I'll eat the cheese and then whatever it was served with.

Like, I guess my question is: what's the point? When I do cheese plates at home I usually just serve it with some bread and a nice preserve. But I think I'd like to get better, IRDK.
post #155 of 243
Thread Starter 
Great question, actually- and the answer is: whatever makes you happy. I'm the who tends to compartmentalize as well. I'd never put eggs on my plate with pancakes and then pour syrup, for example- hate it. I also prefer my cheese to usually "not have stuff in it" so I don't often slather it with other things.

If I am making a cheese board purely for tasting cheese, I pair very little else with it. Usually just a small something with some acidity to help separate the flavors and to scrub the fat off my palate. I then tend to eat one cheese, then something non-cheese, the another cheese etc... and often the bread plain.

For example- cheeses plus a little bread, acidic pickle like cornichons and maybe a tiny bit of dried or fresh fruit ala this plate served at Mission Cheese:



That's 3 cheeses, about a light ounce each. On the small board to the right is bread, dried fig, some dried apricot (maybe one whole) and a few corinchons.

If I put together a big board for an evening dinner in a social setting I find most will take a little of everything and smash it all together. I try to assure that everything on the board works OK combined with anything else to avoid train wrecks. Like cooking, how to combine cheese and other flavors is a learned process - by now I have a decent sense of what goes with what so if friends are over I tend to make the board pretty goof-proof: you can combine almost anything and the result is at least good... while some pairings will be really good and I might suggest somebody try it that way. It's a good way for people to try cheeses that they think or know they do not like plain.

But don't over think it. Basic pairings that work with most foods work with cheese too: sweet with salty, savory and sweet, for example. Jams and spreads are always sweet... so they almost always pair well with just about any cheese as cheese tends towards salty and savory. Using a jam that is savory, like walnut butter, fig, dried date... are nice compliments with any cheese but really can help to tone down strong cheeses like Valdeon,,. that pic I posted a few days ago of aged Gouda, whipped honey and butterscotch toffee... great trio... but I'd not have put that together if I had a really strong blue on the plate. but drop the candy and add some dates and it all would work.

The harder ones are the stinky cheeses some are so strong that any strong jam etc may just get to be too much... so I always try a little first.

Does that help?
post #156 of 243
Thread Starter 
Chabrin - French-Basque, goat milk


post #157 of 243
Thread Starter 
On a French stretch of late... this Chabichou du Poitou was on the far end of aged... dry, firm and chalky. The youngest versions (which we'd never see here unless it was via air freight) are almost spreadable.


post #158 of 243
Thread Starter 
Another French Basque cheese, Meunier's aging of Tomme des Pyrénées


post #159 of 243
Thread Starter 
Shhhhhhh... A bank said yes today blush.gif
post #160 of 243
Thread Starter 
Take note New Yorkers: http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20130301/new-york-city/stinky-cheese-fest-brings-fancy-fromage-nyc
post #161 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Great question, actually- and the answer is: whatever makes you happy. I'm the who tends to compartmentalize as well. I'd never put eggs on my plate with pancakes and then pour syrup, for example- hate it. I also prefer my cheese to usually "not have stuff in it" so I don't often slather it with other things.

If I am making a cheese board purely for tasting cheese, I pair very little else with it. Usually just a small something with some acidity to help separate the flavors and to scrub the fat off my palate. I then tend to eat one cheese, then something non-cheese, the another cheese etc... and often the bread plain.

For example- cheeses plus a little bread, acidic pickle like cornichons and maybe a tiny bit of dried or fresh fruit ala this plate served at Mission Cheese:



That's 3 cheeses, about a light ounce each. On the small board to the right is bread, dried fig, some dried apricot (maybe one whole) and a few corinchons.

If I put together a big board for an evening dinner in a social setting I find most will take a little of everything and smash it all together. I try to assure that everything on the board works OK combined with anything else to avoid train wrecks. Like cooking, how to combine cheese and other flavors is a learned process - by now I have a decent sense of what goes with what so if friends are over I tend to make the board pretty goof-proof: you can combine almost anything and the result is at least good... while some pairings will be really good and I might suggest somebody try it that way. It's a good way for people to try cheeses that they think or know they do not like plain.

But don't over think it. Basic pairings that work with most foods work with cheese too: sweet with salty, savory and sweet, for example. Jams and spreads are always sweet... so they almost always pair well with just about any cheese as cheese tends towards salty and savory. Using a jam that is savory, like walnut butter, fig, dried date... are nice compliments with any cheese but really can help to tone down strong cheeses like Valdeon,,. that pic I posted a few days ago of aged Gouda, whipped honey and butterscotch toffee... great trio... but I'd not have put that together if I had a really strong blue on the plate. but drop the candy and add some dates and it all would work.

The harder ones are the stinky cheeses some are so strong that any strong jam etc may just get to be too much... so I always try a little first.

Does that help?

It does, yes. I guess I was looking for basic info about pairing cheese and non-cheeses! Now I know.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Shhhhhhh... A bank said yes today blush.gif

BALLER.

Now buy a Lambo.
post #162 of 243
Thread Starter 
Which Swiss? A Three Cheese Taste-Off




Edited by Cary Grant - 3/2/13 at 5:26am
post #163 of 243
Thread Starter 
On the heels of the Swiss comparison I ran across this German Alpine-style cheese I'd never had. A new favorite- awesome cheese.

Adelegger



post #164 of 243
that Maxx365 sounds like it is in my wheelhouse. Congrats on separating the bank from its money, I'd hate to think of the hoops you had to jump through to get those soulless pencil necks to agree.
post #165 of 243
Scharfe Maxx is awesome, as is Adelegger. Don't think I've tried the other two.
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