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Faux Demi-Glace - Page 4

post #46 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
That's what the pig's foot is for. They can be a bitch to find, however.

I usually look right under the knee
post #47 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
I usually look right under the knee

Aren't you not allowed to be messing around with pigs?
post #48 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Aren't you not allowed to be messing around with pigs?

well, the pigs don't like it to much.....

but I find it hard to get good iberian ham, or even pulled pork, for that matter, if I avoid pigs.
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
well, the pigs don't like it to much.....

but I find it hard to get good iberian ham, or even pulled pork, for that matter, if I avoid pigs.

It's Bayonne ham you need for demi-glace, not Iberian ham. Did you find the partridges?
post #50 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne View Post
It's Bayonne ham you need for demi-glace, not Iberian ham. Did you find the partridges?

Even Escoffier didn't use partridges, as I recall. That's a Louis XV era recipe. I bet it's good! $100 an ounce ...
post #51 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Even Escoffier didn't use partridges, as I recall. That's a Louis XV era recipe. I bet it's good! $100 an ounce ...

I was referring to Carême's recipe, yes.
post #52 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne View Post
I was referring to Carême's recipe, yes.

Is there any place in the world where that has been made in the last 100 or so years? Just for fun?
post #53 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Is there any place in the world where that has been made in the last 100 or so years? Just for fun?

I wouldn't doubt it, knowing how attached to traditions the French can be.
post #54 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne View Post
I wouldn't doubt it, knowing how attached to traditions the French can be.

It would be cool, for a special occasion dinner, with some really rare wine.

A friend of my dad's somehow got his hands on a magnum of 1875 Lafite that had been in the cellar of a Scottish castle. He split the cost with my dad and two other guys. They had a restaurant prepare some unbelievable five course meal. They dressed in black tie, ate the food, and drank the wine. I was unfortunately six years old at the time, and thus was not invited. But the pictures are nice. Lots of 70s big hair and wide lapels. And unbelievable grins.

Anyway, that's the kind of thing you make Careme's recipe for. Make into a Grand Veneur.
post #55 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
It would be cool, for a special occasion dinner, with some really rare wine.

A friend of my dad's somehow got his hands on a magnum of 1875 Lafite that had been in the cellar of a Scottish castle. He split the cost with my dad and two other guys. They had a restaurant prepare some unbelievable five course meal. They dressed in black tie, ate the food, and drank the wine. I was unfortunately six years old at the time, and thus was not invited. But the pictures are nice. Lots of 70s big hair and wide lapels. And unbelievable grins.

Anyway, that's the kind of thing you make Careme's recipe for. Make into a Grand Veneur.

Yes, it would be cool, but a number of things stand in the way: procuring the ingredients, the fact that they most likely, even in France, no longer taste quite the same as they did back in the 1800's, and we may not be satisfied by the results, as taste evolve from one century to another to another.

I am all in favor of dressing up for a meal that has taken several days to prepare and a bottle of wine that has waited a century to meet a corkscrew. I'd love to do it in period clothing, as a matter of fact, but I'm strange.
post #56 of 58
I just read this again. I can't believe I missed the color references earlier.
post #57 of 58
Just a quick one to say thanks to Manton. What a great post.

Years ago I worked as a "Production Cook" for a small Italian/ French restaurant group. Every week my duties were to make fresh pasta daily, stocks (chicken and demi-glace) twice a week, sausages once a week, grate 4 large wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano every few days, plus assorted fun tasks like de-boning quail on an ad hoc basis.

That restaurant used to have a veal dish that was outstanding. Thin slices of veal with a sauce of 4 types of mustard, a squirt of wine, a shot of demi-glace and a dollop of whipping cream.
post #58 of 58
btw manton, you seem to be quite the chef, but I'm curious as to how well you eat on a daily basis. Do you go all out with the home-made stocks and demi-glace every night? You should start posting in the what did you eat for dinner thread. :P
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