or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Hardwood flooring
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hardwood flooring

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My living room and dining room are adjacent are carpeted and are adjacent to my kitchen, which has hardwood flooring. I'm wanting to put wood in the living and dining rooms.
The hardwood was installed by the previous owners and it appears they used a solid oak flooring from Home Depot. The current wood isn't my favorite, but it isn't bad either.
There is concrete below the wood/carpet, so that significantly adds to the cost of doing more solid wood flooring. I'm giving some thought to pulling up the existing hardwood with the carpet and putting in engineered Brazilian cherry flooring.
I know very little about solid vs. engineered flooring, so I'm looking for your advice. How would you handle this situation?
post #2 of 14
natural wood will have more shrink/expansion concerns, if you can't handle those and think you will replace or not repair whatever you put in, use the engineered stuff. The solid is meant for a lifetime but has to be installed well with a good feel for humidity concerns and laid on the proper base.
post #3 of 14
You typically put down either a full plywood base or a sleeper base (strips of wood affixed to the slab to provide a nailing surface for the flooring) when installing full hardwoods on a concrete slab. Obviously, that adds to the cost. Engineered hardwoods can be installed in a floating fashion (i.e., glued down) on a slab. While engineered hardwoods do expand and contract less with humidity than solid hardwoods, that shouldn't be too much of a concern because a proper hardwood installation accounts for that. Hardwoods should be left unpackaged in your house for a week or two to acclimate to the humidity level so that when they are installed, they are at the ambient humidity level and will experience very little additional expansion or contraction. The downside to engineered hardwoods is that the surface layer is obviously thinner than that of a full hardwood so it can be refinished only 2-3 times before the surface layer is worn through. Of course, even 2-3 refinishings could last you a really long time depending on the hardness of the wood in the surface layer and the nature and amount of traffic that the floor would receive.
post #4 of 14
I have engineered flooring and it's a motherfucker. It gets damaged quite easily as it's essentially a veneer over a solid flooring structure. It dimples when the ladies wear heels, dents if something's dropped on it, gouges and scratches galore. I'd recommended some extensive testing on whatever product you choose if you go this route.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
I should also mention that I'm only going to be in this house for 3 years and 9 months. I'm not doing it specifically to increase the resale value, but since we got a dog our carpet is so gross that it's certainly going to have to be replaced when we list. So rather than paying for carpet in four years that I'll never walk on, I'll spend a little extra on wood now and enjoy having better flooring. If I get a bump in the value of my house, all the better.
post #6 of 14
Anything less than a herringbone parquet, black American walnut floor with a satin poly coat is child's play. Save your dignity accordingly.

post #7 of 14
hardwood floors are horrible on a dog's joints.
post #8 of 14
You are there for three years and you're considering changing the floors? Leave them alone. There are likely more buyers who want oak than those who want Brazilian cherry, IMO.

If I had to choose a floor it would be walnut, teak or white oak. The exotics have a more narrow range of enthusiasts.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopkins_student View Post

I should also mention that I'm only going to be in this house for 3 years and 9 months. I'm not doing it specifically to increase the resale value, but since we got a dog our carpet is so gross that it's certainly going to have to be replaced when we list. So rather than paying for carpet in four years that I'll never walk on, I'll spend a little extra on wood now and enjoy having better flooring. If I get a bump in the value of my house, all the better.

Definitely engineered hardwood due to the lower price, then. Just make sure you choose a wood species and brand of engineered hardwood that is known to stand up to canine traffic.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

You are there for three years and you're considering changing the floors? Leave them alone. There are likely more buyers who want oak than those who want Brazilian cherry, IMO.

If I had to choose a floor it would be walnut, teak or white oak. The exotics have a more narrow range of enthusiasts.


Three years is a long time. If he has the budget, why not?
post #11 of 14
Because 3 years s not a long time.
post #12 of 14
Engineered wood can have different thicknesses of the wear layer. Obviously thicker is better. And it shouldn't dent any easier than solid hardwood. Also thinness has its advantages when matching it to other floors. On a slab a proper solid wood floor is going to be an inch or more higher than surrounding floors.

The big thing about wood floors on concrete is moisture. Concrete is porous. You need an effective moisture barrier or the floors, engineered or not, are going to warp. I personally like glued down engineered wood, in which case you need to use either a two-part glue and moisture barrier, or a premixed (expensive!) glue and moisture barrier. Don't use water based glue either. Wouldn't do a floating floor.

I did my own install of engineered wood not too long ago. The hardest part was removing the old floor and leveling the slab (which needs to be flat). After that it's pretty straightforward: mark chalk line 24" out. Trowel glue. Lay floor. Repeat as necessary.
post #13 of 14
I laid real hardwood before, hardest thing was waiting the time required to let the wood bundle acclimate to the house (like a week? two weeks?) then squaring off that first line properly before building out. 3 or 4 years later it still lays flat and has gone through a few seasons. Can't imagine how hard laying parquet or chevron is, would take a pro. I have the balls to do somthing like that but I'd probably fuck it up and not realize til the end.
post #14 of 14
Herringbone pattern is easy. The only hard part starting it, which is obviously more involved than a straight line.

I did a herringbone in brick pavers on my patio, though I did a 90 degree because making precise repeated cuts in brick is hard without the right kind of saw. It's easy with wood since everybody has a table saw.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Hardwood flooring