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Esquire's Salary Based Suit Buying Guide - Page 4

post #46 of 108
Probably OK if you're young free and single, which presumably is Esquire's target readership. But if one has mortgages, rent, car payments, student loans, HP, credit card bills, alimony, school fees, medical bills, etc. that's another matter.
post #47 of 108
For those that are following along, Esquire recommends that you spend about 2 cents on suits for each dollar you earn. So much wisdom! The editorial board did an excellent job selecting suits to stick to this roughly linear relationship.

Salary Suit Cost Percent of Pre-Tax Salary
$30,000 $500 1.67% Kenneth Cole
$50,000 $1,000 2.00% Abboud
$70,000 $1,500 2.14% Hugo Boss diffusion
$100,000 $2,000 2.00% Paul Smith diffusion
$150,000 $3,000 2.00% Zegna mainline
$250,000 $5,000 2.00% RLPL
$500,000 $7,000 1.40% Attolini


Also, it's important to note that one attains "Big Timer" status when one hits the $150k salary mark. At that point, you can start buying Zegna mainline. I myself have been able to make this leap, and haven't looked back since. Can't believe I started out as a scrub with a closet full of KC, Abboud, and Hugo Boss diffusion line suits!!!!

Can't wait to hit $500k and purchase my first Attolini!!!!
Edited by jrd617 - 9/25/12 at 10:40pm
post #48 of 108
I've created this handy chart:

34gah4g.jpg
post #49 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

For what it's worth, I believe in the pre-war period of America, men used to spend about 12% of their annual income on clothes (I believe I have the figure right). Just because they've now decided to take on other expensive purchases, rather than spend the money on clothes, doesn't mean that someone making $50k a year can't afford a $1k suit (should they decide to forgo the mortgages, cars, and whatever else, of course).

Also don't forget this article is not going to be read by the typical "American" guy who buy Wrangler jeans cause he sees Brett Farve on TV telling him they're comfortable. Its really about priorities. I don't have to wear a suit to work, but I do. Its what I like, and what makes me happy, even when I was making les $ than I do now. I sacrifice, and while others who spend what I do on clothing may be able to drive an Audi, or a Porsche, I drive a Honda CRV (fucking hate it btw). We eat at home as a family (started because of my son's horrendous food allergies) so we don't spend a lot on that kind of entertainment, we don't go on many vacations, etc. While it may not jive with the rest of the Esquire lifestyle, at a 30K salary, their guide for buying suits for guys who care about buying suits, or place clothing higher on their priority list, is not far off at all. I know plenty of people who earn what I do who are baffled at how much I spend on clothes, but who wouldn't bat an eye at dropping $5k on a weekend in Atlantic City...the Esquire article won't be read by them...
post #50 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

I've created this handy chart:
34gah4g.jpg

holy shit this is amazing, needs to go on the front page for everyone to see!

post #51 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

I've created this handy chart:
34gah4g.jpg

Seriously, post this on the front page, it should answer everyone's questions forever. This board is officially done.
post #52 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

Probably OK if you're young free and single, which presumably is Esquire's target readership. But if one has mortgages, rent, car payments, student loans, HP, credit card bills, alimony, school fees, medical bills, etc. that's another matter.




For those going through a divorce Esquire might want to suggest this option:


post #53 of 108
The problem with this article is that it's written with no regard to idea that your profession, not your income, weighs more heavily on how much $ one would need to spend on suits. For simplicity, we need to assume that demand is driven by work requirements, and not style or choice, otherwise it would be impossible to categorize people and write the article in the first place. Most Americans that work in an office do not wear a suit, especially someone making 30k. Therefore, he has the option to, and he should, invest in 2 quality suits rather than buying a handful of 4-$500 suits. A man should not be spending more money on suits simply because he has more money, and he should not be buying cheap suits simply because he has less money (unless he is legitimately poor and desperately needs a suit). If you can afford a $500 suit, you can likely afford to save a little longer and buy a quality suit for just a few hundred dollars more, or you could thrift one. The whole piece is just a big pile of shit, really. There isn't a single applicable or helpful tidbit to be found. It is an advertisement, and a window through which readers can gawk at what others making more than them have access to, although I'm sure they consider it helpful to their readers on some level.
post #54 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

 

They ares still dead wrong. 

 

Handyman mentality is pervasive in Asia as well, except no one in highly urbanized areas needs freaking building material warehouses around the block.  They just need Ace Hardware/Orchard Supply type of stores, instead of Home Depot/Lowes.  Or at least model their Manhattan store instead of Salinas store...

 

 

Well you mentioned pre-war period and if my memory serves me correctly, income tax isn't permanent until 1913 and SSI did not exist until 1935.  At 'pre-war' period, tax burden per citizen are much lower.

 

 

Pre-war period reference since he is siting pre-war statistics.  And 'colored' includes more than just Black/African Americans.

 

Ah I see. Wait wut?  So we are supposed to use era "appropriate" labels when referring to an era?  I'd hate to see you address a situation in antebellum U.S., if that's the case.  

post #55 of 108
lurker[1].gif
post #56 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

The problem with this article is that it's written with no regard to idea that your profession, not your income, weighs more heavily on how much $ one would need to spend on suits. For simplicity, we need to assume that demand is driven by work requirements, and not style or choice, otherwise it would be impossible to categorize people and write the article in the first place. Most Americans that work in an office do not wear a suit, especially someone making 30k. Therefore, he has the option to, and he should, invest in 2 quality suits rather than buying a handful of 4-$500 suits. A man should not be spending more money on suits simply because he has more money, and he should not be buying cheap suits simply because he has less money (unless he is legitimately poor and desperately needs a suit). If you can afford a $500 suit, you can likely afford to save a little longer and buy a quality suit for just a few hundred dollars more, or you could thrift one. The whole piece is just a big pile of shit, really. There isn't a single applicable or helpful tidbit to be found. It is an advertisement, and a window through which readers can gawk at what others making more than them have access to, although I'm sure they consider it helpful to their readers on some level.

There's no problem with this article. The problem is that some of our readers are assuming that it's meant to be helpful advice. It's not. It's just an entertaining bit of faux voyeurism - like most lifestyle editorials. How many people read Monocle and say "Yeah, I am totally going to this deli in Stockholm," or do comparison shopping for yachts on the Robb Report?
post #57 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Not just any old white - aryan.

Your wife practices Vedic Hinduism? That's fairly unusual among white people. And I didn't realize Vedic Hindus were prominently involved in WWI.
post #58 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I have to wonder how many guys making $30K or less buy suits, period, much less are constrained to wear them by business necessity.

 

Count me in (not by necessity though).

But of course my wardrobe is mostly cheap...

post #59 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

For those that are following along, Esquire recommends that you spend about 2 cents on suits for each dollar you earn. So much wisdom! The editorial board did an excellent job selecting suits to stick to this roughly linear relationship.
Salary Suit Cost Percent of Pre-Tax Salary
$30,000 $500 1.67% Kenneth Cole
$50,000 $1,000 2.00% Abboud
$70,000 $1,500 2.14% Hugo Boss diffusion
$100,000 $2,000 2.00% Paul Smith diffusion
$150,000 $3,000 2.00% Zegna mainline
$250,000 $5,000 2.00% RLPL
$500,000 $7,000 1.40% Attolini
Also, it's important to note that one attains "Big Timer" status when one hits the $150k salary mark. At that point, you can start buying Zegna mainline. I myself have been able to make this leap, and haven't looked back since. Can't believe I started out as a scrub with a closet full of KC, Abboud, and Hugo Boss diffusion line suits!!!!
Can't wait to hit $500k and purchase my first Attolini!!!!


Not sure how sensible this is, though?  Will judges you need to buy about three to four bits of tailored clothing a year to cover wear and tear (I think that's slightly on the generous side, but perhaps right if your still in an expansionist phase and / or use lots of fine, delicate supers or summer fabrics).  That means closer to 6 to 8% of pre-tax salary, which seems a lot to me given other clothing and shoes spending not to say living prudently, within your means and saving for retirement.

post #60 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

There's no problem with this article. The problem is that some of our readers are assuming that it's meant to be helpful advice. It's not. It's just an entertaining bit of faux voyeurism - like most lifestyle editorials. How many people read Monocle and say "Yeah, I am totally going to this deli in Stockholm," or do comparison shopping for yachts on the Robb Report?

Those mega yacht mags they sell at barnes and noble were the first thing that came to mind when reading the article.
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