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Where do you live? - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Come to England, where the average speed on the M40 (Brimingham-Oxford-London) is 100 mph, yet the speed limit is 70 mph. Too bad the average speed in Central London is abput 4-5 mph. Actually do one better and go to Germany. (no speed limits)
post #17 of 32
I'm from Hartford, CT. Not much to say about Hartford really. We have a nice arts/culture scene. The Wadsworth Antheneum is nice. Its one of the countries oldest museams. It has the largest collection of African-American art in the country if I'm not mistaken. We also have the Bushnell it has plays,forums and various other events. And Hartford stage has a lot of plays from Broadway. Hartford the city is fairly poor and violent in a lot of the neighborhoods and the school system leaves much to desire. Greater hartford on the other had has high incomes, a great school system and isn't too exppensive to live in, if your one for the suburbs. Hartford location between New York and Boston,1 1/2 to 2 hours away from each, assures Hartford will be relativly obscure no matter what we do. But being sandwich between the two best cities in the country isnt exactly terrible.
post #18 of 32
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Come to England, where the average speed on the M40 (Brimingham-Oxford-London) is 100 mph, yet the speed limit is 70 mph. Too bad the average speed in Central London is abput 4-5 mph. Actually do one better and go to Germany. (no speed limits)
A bit of a problem: I'd have to learn how to drive on the other side of the road and shift with my left hand. That's going to take a while... Plus the one drawback whilst driving in London is that if you are in damn congestion charge zone, you have to pay 5 pounds per day; what kind of insanity is that? I don't imagine, Miami, L.A, or NYC doing something like that, ever. Most places in SoFLA are relatively traffic free (except for bumper to bumper rush on a Friday evening during the height of season). Jon.
post #19 of 32
That's what I meant by Kenny red C charge.. You have to pay a toll to get into Manhattan, on all the bridges and tunnels, you may not know that in the UK we don't have any tolls, (except on private roads, like the Dartford Tunnel, Severn Crossing and M6 Toll Road) If you are a resident within the zone you don't have to pay it, and besides that the zone is very small, its only from Marble Arch and Soho to Bank. (as if that would mean anything to you ) Also 5 pounds is not so much, it costs about that in a cab or on the tube. As I resident I don't pay it but it would not realy worry me.
post #20 of 32
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That's what I meant by Kenny red C charge.. You have to pay a toll to get into Manhattan, on all the bridges and tunnels, you may not know that in the UK we don't have any tolls, (except on private roads, like the Dartford Tunnel, Severn Crossing and M6 Toll Road) If you are a resident within the zone you don't have to pay it, and besides that the zone is very small, its only from Marble Arch and Soho to Bank. (as if that would mean anything to you ) Also 5 pounds is not so much, it costs about that in a cab or on the tube. As I resident I don't pay it but it would not realy worry me.
Worry and willing are two separate things altogether. I would not worry about the 5-pound charge if I needed to pay it, but would be unwilling to do so...I don't live (gratefully) with that predicament though... I have not been to London in many years so no, that particular area would not mean anything to me, just as mentioning I-595 would mean nothing to you, to each person his own. I could not take 4-5 mph on the road, I would rather walk / bike ride... anything below 35 mph is unbearable. Jon.
post #21 of 32
Don't worry is kind of British slag, not literally, like you Americans would say chill out, or its cool.
post #22 of 32
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Don't worry is kind of British slag, not literally, like you Americans would say chill out, or its cool.
I see. Ok, cool. Jon.
post #23 of 32
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Then where have you found more cultured people? London? I'd say it's just about the same, if not less than NY
Though I would say NY and London are about the same, we do have a much much more decent accent, I mean in the UK if someone pronounced ask, past, grass, sarcastic, Atlantic, Milan etc. The way Americans do, you would think they come from a council estate or something... In addition, bars, clubs, etc. in London are by far the best in the world, (for restaurants, I must say NYC wins). In NYC one is likley to see many, so to say "Commoners" in such establishments, this certainly is not the case in London, at places like Opium, and Cafe De Paris. High society in London is also one of the finest. Though, Monaco, Geneva, New Delhi, and Hong Kong are the best. It realy depends on what aspects you look at. Places like London, and NYC may have the reputation, but turly one must look at places like, Florence, Rome, Paris, Geneva, Venice, and Monaco/St. Tropez for the most opulent places in the world... NYC is truly not opulent, London certainly is more so in terms of architecture.
post #24 of 32
Here in Seattle, it's nothing really all that exciting. Our sports teams are the worst of extreme underachievers, we get worldwide blame for being the home of corporate evildoers Starbucks and Microsoft, and people always associate us with "grunge music" even though it's been DEAD since the mid nineties. The food selection ranges from "non-edible" to "acceptable" most of the time, but I'm not really that picky. Lots of imitation asian cuisine, and fresh seafood when you want it; which is nice. Unfortunately the nightlife leaves something to be desired. With the exception of the University District and some smaller areas surrounding downtown, this place gets horribly boring. I don't really know what definition of "culture" you guys are using, and I tend to disagree with that word entirely, when used in this context. (It makes me feel "uncultured") but there are plenty of people who go to see art shows, and the theater and all that stuff. I mean, what else do all those 10,000 Microsoft millionaires, dot com survivors, grown-up child-actors, and etc. that live up here *DO* with their spare time? The weather is actually pretty nice right now though, 70 degrees and sunny most of the week, one or two days of light rain here and there. I miss Tokyo
post #25 of 32
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I love nothing more in the morning than to drive off of I-95 at 8:57 am (just in time for work) right into the main road at 40mph, where a sharp turn leads on to the plaza and then a straightaway, ....
Jon:  I also live in Palm Beach County, in Wellington, and let me say you are the first person I've ever heard say he enjoys driving on I95. To me it's death valley. I loathe I95. The turnpike, however, is a nother matter. It is well-maintained and the people seem to obey common sense traffic rules better (Don't freaking drive 45 in the left lane....)
post #26 of 32
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I love nothing more in the morning than to drive off of I-95 at 8:57 am (just in time for work) right into the main road at 40mph, where a sharp turn leads on to the plaza and then a straightaway, ....
Jon: I also live in Palm Beach County, in Wellington, and let me say you are the first person I've ever heard say he enjoys driving on I95. To me it's death valley. I loathe I95. The turnpike, however, is a nother matter. It is well-maintained and the people seem to obey common sense traffic rules better (Don't freaking drive 45 in the left lane....)
You misunderstand: I do not particularly like I-95 (yes the turnpike is a lot better, especially northbound past palm beach county where I-95 and the turnpike are almost side by side). But, driving on I-95 from Glades Rd to Yamato is a fairly easy proposition. Plus I do not drive on the left lane at 40 mph. I drive around 80-100 mph (traffic permitting) on the left lane . When I drive 40 mph, it is whilst I take the turn from Yamato to the entrance of the road to the office complex where I work. Jon.
post #27 of 32
There's not much to say about Seoul except that it's crowded, dusty, dirty, and crowded. It doesn't hold a candle to Tokyo. People here don't care where they toss their garbage, and it really really shows. Of course, there are the cleaner districts: Myongdong, Apgujeong, Kangnam to name a few. These are full of the rich people with the nice cars who get to be around the fancy buildings and the pretty girls who tend to pose in these places. 12-13 million people, and they all suck at driving. Shopping sucks too. I can't get H Hilfiger here, but I'm sure they're in Tokyo. Argh
post #28 of 32
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I now live outside Providence, RI.  Another great little city that has been rated as one of the "best places to live" at least once or twice by some such magazie.
Yes, but isn't Providence, RI basically run by The Mob? I've never been there, but I hear it is corruption central...
post #29 of 32
What, no poll option for 'Rural?' Interesting. That would be my choice. I suppose most individuals with a sartorial interest do not tend to congregate in pastoral areas (at least not primarily). I would have to drive over 60 miles to buy a suit of higher grade than Hickey-Freeman or HSM, but there are advantages. Regards, Huntsman
post #30 of 32
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I now live outside Providence, RI.  Another great little city that has been rated as one of the "best places to live" at least once or twice by some such magazie.
Hmmm...I'm a former Providence man myself. So to speak. I lived in Cumberland, and before that in Woonsocket. Now I'm a real square, living near the triangle of Chicago, Madison, and Milwaukee (though I move in really cool circles . ).
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