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Where do you live?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
My possible move from Northern Virginia to DC has got me interested in where the members of the forum live.  Please describe the benefits and drawbacks of your city, town, or suburb as well.  If you live in a city that is part of a larger metropolitan area (e.g. Cambridge-Boston, West Hollywood-L.A.) I live it up to your judgment as to how you categorize it.
post #2 of 32
Greater London, United Kingdom Living in a city has a lot of advantages, especially London, as it is the only city in the UK worth being in, Birmingham and Manchester are not even worthy of being called cities. For one thing it has to simply be the overall lifestyle, the people in a city are mostly upper or lower class, or maybe students, hardly ever the middle class, so you get a much more exciting perspective on life, because lets face it - the middle class are boring. People will be a little less kind, but I see it as being less intrusive. You must go into the city to eat, drink and shop, so you can imagine what it is like to have all that at your doorstep, not just on the weekend. People are very buisness minded, you will become more enterprising for sure as a Londoner. Drawbacks are, TOURISTS..., traffic (although kennny and his red C charge has helped) ,and poverty around you, like the eastern european immigrants, though they can be helpful for labour. A major thing, people don't slobber around the house, drinking beer, and watching football (soccer), rather they go to bars, resteraunts, and clubs.
post #3 of 32
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My possible move from Northern Virginia to DC has got me interested in where the members of the forum live.  Please describe the benefits and drawbacks of your city, town, or suburb as well.  If you live in a city that is part of a larger metropolitan area (e.g. Cambridge-Boston, West Hollywood-L.A.) I live it up to your judgment as to how you categorize it.
I grew up in Northern Virginia (Reston) I now live in Boulder, Colorado. Benefits: Close to mountains and wilderness; lots of open space; lots of good restaurants and cultural events; weather is just about perfect. Bad: Surrounding areas are becoming a bit crowded. We're looking at our third year in a row of drought. Schools are quite poor.
post #4 of 32
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Please describe the benefits and drawbacks of your city...
New Orleans, Louisiana Great: Food, MARDI GRAS, culture, musical acts Good: Weather (it's never cold here), year-round events Bad: Richest of rich live next to the poorest of the poor Worst: You saw the Armed Robbery thread I think most every major city has a lot of the same benefits and drawbacks. As Kalra mentioned, you have everything at your doorstep. And as I've learned, you need to respect the city and be aware of certain areas.
post #5 of 32
Ehm, why classifying major metropolis as > 500,000? I would think a few millions as the bare minimum.
post #6 of 32
Nothing beats living in NYC. You can do whatever you want, get whatever you want, at any time of the day. Plus the food is awesome, though not much of a local cusine unless you count bagles, hotdogs, and a knish. The most interesting aspect I've found living here after travelling extensively throughout N. America, and Europe (India as well), is that the people in New York seem to be the most cultured people anywhere. Most people are well educated, appreciate the arts, well travelled, and are open to new culture. You'll find more of this in larger cities. Oh yea, and hotter women tend to congregate in larger cities as well...
post #7 of 32
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Nothing beats living in NYC. You can do whatever you want, get whatever you want, at any time of the day. Plus the food is awesome, though not much of a local cusine unless you count bagles, hotdogs, and a knish.
Amen. I wish so much that Harvard and Columbia, or better yet, NYU, could suddenly switch locations. And I love bagels, hotdogs, and knishes. But then, I love all greasy spoon diner food and most deli foods. The people in NY seem pretty cool too, although I'd argue that they are a lot less laid back than folks in LA. How about making the perfect city? NYC with San Diego weather and LA people.
post #8 of 32
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is that the people in New York seem to be the most cultured people anywhere. Most people are well educated, appreciate the arts, well travelled, and are open to new culture. You'll find more of this in larger cities.
I don't want to sound rude. So I'll just say I don't agree, perhaps in the US. I think you get the picture , maybe...
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Oh yea, and hotter women tend to congregate in larger cities as well
Damm right there...
post #9 of 32
I live in Boca Raton, FL (something's are good, and something's are bad, just like everywhere else in the world) but, the weather can't be beat (except for those pesky hurricanes). "Nothing beats living in NYC. You can do whatever you want, get whatever you want, at any time of the day." Um, what are you buying at 3 in the morning? Seriously, if you are out at 3 in the morning with a mission to purchase something, the probability of it being a legal substance is slim to none. Seriously, my local supermarket is opened until' 12 at night, and I think that's late enough. "Plus the food is awesome, though not much of a local cuisine unless you count bagles, hotdogs, and a knish." Yeah, that's basically the standard breakfast where Jews settle, thus South Florida delis (Rascal House anybody?). Of course, that's not to take away the fame (deservedly) or the yummy goodness from either Katz or Carnegie deli in NYC. " The most interesting aspect I've found living here after traveling extensively throughout N. America, and Europe (India as well), is that the people in New York seem to be the most cultured people anywhere. Most people are well educated, appreciate the arts, well traveled, and are open to new culture. You'll find more of this in larger cities." Ok, so South Florida is horrible when it comes to manners, but so is NYC. There is a difference between money and culture (just look at the arts funding in Florida, the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts is starving for acts to come and play, whilst Palm Beach island is 1 ½ miles away). There is a reason why New Yorkers have a "hard, nasty attitude" reputation. You want cultured, polite people? Toronto, Ontario, Canada. "Oh yea, and hotter women tend to congregate in larger cities as well..." Well, in Florida and California, with the "driving everywhere" mentality, the typical "large city" (i.e. Miami, L.A.) is not the same as it is in the northeast, there are things in the suburbs, and there are many medium sized cities that have many delightful sights (seriously, go to Town Center Mall in Boca Raton, or Bal Harbour Mall, just south of Aventura, FL to see drop-dead gorgeous women). Jon.
post #10 of 32
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Um, what are you buying at 3 in the morning?
Booze, cigarettes, various items to satiate the munchies, Advil, Altoids ... It's good to know if you need something, you can get it. And it doesn't even have to be illegal; most times for me, it ain't. Living in a city is the life, personally. There's so much collected in one place: want to skip from a posh coffee shop to a rare vinyl store to the Whitney Biennial to a pizza place to umpteen bars, both dive and swank? Only in a city. Even in smaller cities, like Atlanta, there's such a collision of spaces and cultures and personalities that you can find your niche(s), even the ones you never knew you fit into. Not knocking the burbs at all, but as someone who has grown up in three different cities, few things beat metropolis life, especially for twentysomethings.
post #11 of 32
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You want cultured, polite people? Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
That's nothing. Try Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Honestly, there's nowhere else like it, at least not in North America.
post #12 of 32
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Um, what are you buying at 3 in the morning?
Booze, cigarettes, various items to satiate the munchies, Advil, Altoids ... It's good to know if you need something, you can get it. And it doesn't even have to be illegal; most times for me, it ain't. Living in a city is the life, personally. There's so much collected in one place: want to skip from a posh coffee shop to a rare vinyl store to the Whitney Biennial to a pizza place to umpteen bars, both dive and swank? Only in a city. Even in smaller cities, like Atlanta, there's such a collision of spaces and cultures and personalities that you can find your niche(s), even the ones you never knew you fit into. Not knocking the burbs at all, but as someone who has grown up in three different cities, few things beat metropolis life, especially for twentysomethings.
You need Altoids at 3 in the morning? Don't you keep food stocked in your refrigerator? Yes, I will agree (Having lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina: 11 million people and Toronto, Canada) that cities are great for twenty-somethings, if you can afford it. NYC is expensive (very, expensive), so is London. In fact, most of the world's major cities are expensive (with some exceptions). The good thing about the long distances is driving. I love nothing more in the morning than to drive off of I-95 at 8:57 am (just in time for work) right into the main road at 40mph, where a sharp turn leads on to the plaza and then a straightaway, whilst still holding 40mph as I go around the turn and the tires squeal ever so slightly. You can't do that everyday in Manhattan. Jon.
post #13 of 32
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In fact, most of the world's major cities are expensive (with some exceptions).
I would disagree, I'd say all cities are expensive, in Mumbai land values are higher than Manhattan for a normaly quality property in places like Bandra, and Nariman Point (this is obviously not including the shanty towns). This is no lie, it is an actual fact.
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The good thing about the long distances is driving. I love nothing more in the morning than to drive off of I-95 at 8:57 am (just in time for work) right into the main road at 40mph, where a sharp turn leads on to the plaza and then a straightaway, whilst still holding 40mph as I go around the turn and the tires squeal ever so slightly. You can't do that everyday in Manhattan.
But you can do 100mph at night on Park Lane I'd say the best balance is LA, wherby the layout is sort of suburban, but all the factors of a city are certainly there.
post #14 of 32
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is that the people in New York seem to be the most cultured people anywhere. Most people are well educated, appreciate the arts, well travelled, and are open to new culture. You'll find more of this in larger cities.
I don't want to sound rude. So I'll just say I don't agree, perhaps in the US. I think you get the picture , maybe...
Then where have you found more cultured people? London? I'd say it's just about the same, if not less than NY.
post #15 of 32
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In fact, most of the world's major cities are expensive (with some exceptions).
I would disagree, I'd say all cities are expensive, in Mumbai land values are higher than Manhattan for a normaly quality property in places like Bandra, and Nariman Point (this is obviously not including the shanty towns). This is no lie, it is an actual fact.
Quote:
The good thing about the long distances is driving. I love nothing more in the morning than to drive off of I-95 at 8:57 am (just in time for work) right into the main road at 40mph, where a sharp turn leads on to the plaza and then a straightaway, whilst still holding 40mph as I go around the turn and the tires squeal ever so slightly. You can't do that everyday in Manhattan.
But you can do 100mph at night on Park Lane I'd say the best balance is LA, wherby the layout is sort of suburban, but all the factors of a city are certainly there.
Well, on either I-595 or the Florida Turnpike, you can go well into the 170-180 mph range at night. Of course, I-595 is in the middle of nowhere.... I am told that the best place to speed in the USA is around the Nevada to New Mexico area. Lots of desert, long straight roads and very little police activity. Yes, L.A. has a nice balanced feel to it, akin to Miami, though Miami is on a slightly smaller scale (not for long though, damn city keeps on growing). Jon.
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