or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › What are the greatest menswear brands of all time?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What are the greatest menswear brands of all time? - Page 31

post #451 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post

I hear you, I agree with you.

BUT (worst word ever) Come on stitchy, you know a a good chunk of folks are simply going to read the thread title, hit reply and add their 2.

Op's gotta clarify title or else you all will end up pulling your hair out!

yup, people will continue to do that. and i will continue to administer the verbal falcon punch. smile.gif
post #452 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

as if we have been here talking about the weather and colon health

 

It's been raining here for the past few days.  Not pleasant.  The temperatures are fluctuating wildly from early AM to early PM.  It was 51 °F at 6AM this morning, but 77 °F at 2PM.  Global warming?

 

A high fiber diet and regular colonoscopies starting at age 50 (and once every 10 years thereafter, in the absence of risk factors) are good preventative measures to the development of colorectal cancer.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

yup, people will continue to do that. and i will continue to administer the verbal falcon punch. smile.gif

 

Straight shot, right to the babymaker.

post #453 of 500
Continuing on ...

I think we've had a good discussion of important designers. I know the business side of fashion much less well than some others here (Fok, for example). However, while our list is more or less solidified, I think it would be interesting to talk more about some of the pioneers on the business side of (tailored) menswear.

Some possibilities:

Nino Cerruti, I believe, was one of the first designers to purposely try to get his clothing into movies (and get movie stars to wear his designs off screen). Now we just take that close relationship between Hollywood and fashion for granted. Cerruti, however, did it in the mid-60s. Though I don't know if he was the first to reach out, but he was certainly one of the early ones (Brioni at this time obviously had a close relationship with American movie stars, but I don't know if they reached out to actors, or actors reached out to them).

It's also been said that Dave the Tailor (Dave KC Sheung) played an important role in re-establishing the reputation of Chinese tailors after the Second World War. This was important for that part of the trade in Beijing and Shanghai that primarily serves tourists.

Who was the first to establish mass MTM? And who was the first to take it online? I know Kilgour, French, and Stanbury in the late 90s introduced a cheap "straight finish," which basically was executed by tailors in Shanghai. Today we have Mahon pioneering an interesting Savile Row to MTM model in East India.

Finally, I've been reading Ready-Made Democracy by M. Zakin. He has these interesting chapters about the rise of "pattern businesses" - essentially companies that sold paper patterns to various tailors (before, each tailor had to come up with their own patterns, and they were closely guarded secrets). The effect was a huge revolution in the organization of labor, a shift in how profits could be made, and an interesting new distribution of style (tailors in Podunk could finally offer their clients the latest "New York fashions.") None of those "paper pattern" companies are brands, of course, but for anyone interested in the evolution of men's dress and the business behind it, Zakim is a great read.
Edited by dieworkwear - 10/12/12 at 6:18pm
post #454 of 500
Also, have we already talked about what Loro Piana has done for cashmere? Not technically, but the business/ marketing of it. They come up with some pretty incredible stories and marketing material. Was it always marketed like this, or is this an LP invention?
post #455 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post

This list is insane aside from  2,3,9 ,10 and 12 teacha.gif    Barneys co-op one of the best of all time, eh? cheers.gif

I've got two Barney's co-op neckties. smile.gif
post #456 of 500
To Derek's question about pioneers on the business side of tailored menswear, I know they've been talked about ad nauseum in this thread already, but it's hard not to mention Brooks Brothers for basically introducing the RTW suit.
post #457 of 500
derek - interesting questions. i wish i had info on that. i look forward to reading what the more knowledgeable people have to say on that.
post #458 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Also, have we already talked about what Loro Piana has done for cashmere? Not technically, but the business/ marketing of it. They come up with some pretty incredible stories and marketing material. Was it always marketed like this, or is this an LP invention?

I think its been mentioned, I don't think anyone can dispute that Loro Piana deserves to be on the list.
post #459 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturdays View Post

I think its been mentioned, I don't think anyone can dispute that Loro Piana deserves to be on the list.

I think (though the discussion was brief) a few of us argued that it would be on a top 100 list, but not 50. Weighing it pound for pound against bigger manufacturers with a wider range of products and distribution (Zegna) or against smaller 'Niche" makers or individuals with a unique aesthetic (Barbera, Cuccinelli, etc.) does it hold up?

For example, I see part of the utility of a top-50 list that those chosen act as representatives of a larger area... i.e. Yohji represents artisinal, dark, unique fabric cuts in goth-ish styling... so you don't really need CCP, Carpe Diem/LMaltieri, etc. Likewise, with Helmut Lang, you then don't really need Costume National, Neil Barrett, etc. even though a case could be made for each one. Same with Savile Row tailors... one or two serves to represent the 20 possible that might be chosen.

Obviously, with 50 there are enough for a few "crowd favorites" so Loro Piana might be fine. In general, though, it's interesting to discuss/weigh all the options.
post #460 of 500
I tried searching a few academic business journals to see if there have been any case studies done on LP, and to see if their marketing of cashmere has been unique. Not much came up, at least in English (a couple in Italian, but I don't read Italian). Online Googling, however, brought up this on the Harvard Business Review's blog. Terribly, terribly disappointing article.

This is essentially the problem with doing any serious, thoughtful work on menswear. So much of the landscape is polluted with recycled marketing hype and press releases. Just take a look at the books that have been published on the subject. RJ recently recommended me Savile Row: An Illustrated History by Richard Walker. I'm reading it now and it's a truly great. Even after just a single chapter you can see how poor other books on the topic compare. So many of them just recycle press releases and marketing materials.
post #461 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I tried searching a few academic business journals to see if there have been any case studies done on LP, and to see if their marketing of cashmere has been unique. Not much came up, at least in English (a couple in Italian, but I don't read Italian). Online Googling, however, brought up this on the Harvard Business Review's blog. Terribly, terribly disappointing article.
This is essentially the problem with doing any serious, thoughtful work on menswear. So much of the landscape is polluted with recycled marketing hype and press releases. Just take a look at the books that have been published on the subject. RJ recently recommended me Savile Row: An Illustrated History by Richard Walker. I'm reading it now and it's a truly great. Even after just a single chapter you can see how poor other books on the topic compare. So many of them just recycle press releases and marketing materials.

Very, very true. Fashion and menswear have never been subjected to the rigorous social science methodologies of other fields (musicology, art history, etc). It's both a shame and also quite surprising, given that we may not all listen to Stranvinsky or view Rothko, but we all wear clothes.

Maybe some of us tiring of academia could start a new field? Surely there's a lot of room for growth beyond Barthe's "Fashion System." wink.gif
post #462 of 500
Well there are tons of good books on how fashion or clothes affect some other social factor. I've been working my way through a reading list on how men's dress has affected notions of class, identity, and citizenship. But yes, nobody has done a serious academic study on "menswear" per se. The it's always the independent variable to some other thing academics are interested in. Though, from those books, you can read some really interesting things, even from just a clothing perspective.

I haven't read many books on fashion, but I assume it's a much better studied field, no? I was thinking of trying to get some syllabi from FIT classes and buying some of the required readings. I recently picked up Fabric Science, which they use at FIT, but it's obviously more orientated towards professional interests than "academic."
post #463 of 500
Not necessarily focused on just menswear, but those interested in the topic of fashion brand building may want to take a look at this. I haven't read it yet, but it's commonly assigned in fashion design schools.
post #464 of 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Not necessarily focused on just menswear, but those interested in the topic of fashion brand building may want to take a look at this. I haven't read it yet, but it's commonly assigned in fashion design schools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post


I think you should make a list of books to read, past few books you've mentioned all look interesting and something I am definitely interested in learning more about. Thanks for the input.

I think (though the discussion was brief) a few of us argued that it would be on a top 100 list, but not 50. Weighing it pound for pound against bigger manufacturers with a wider range of products and distribution (Zegna) or against smaller 'Niche" makers or individuals with a unique aesthetic (Barbera, Cuccinelli, etc.) does it hold up?
For example, I see part of the utility of a top-50 list that those chosen act as representatives of a larger area... i.e. Yohji represents artisinal, dark, unique fabric cuts in goth-ish styling... so you don't really need CCP, Carpe Diem/LMaltieri, etc. Likewise, with Helmut Lang, you then don't really need Costume National, Neil Barrett, etc. even though a case could be made for each one. Same with Savile Row tailors... one or two serves to represent the 20 possible that might be chosen.
Obviously, with 50 there are enough for a few "crowd favorites" so Loro Piana might be fine. In general, though, it's interesting to discuss/weigh all the options.

I think it depends on how you classify what goes in the top 50, and i partially agree with you. A focus on pioneers and strong influences over the past two centuries are probably more coherent to a list, in my opinion.

Looking forward to seeing this list, hopefully some background and though into each brand and why its placed
post #465 of 500
Remember, we only have 100 words for each brand. There is really little space to get into history, legacy, defining ad campaigns, iconic products, etc. It's somewhat a somewhat cursory review of each line, roughly ranked in order of importance. More meant to be stir discussion, I think, than anything, which I think at this point it has.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › What are the greatest menswear brands of all time?