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suede/non-suede bucks in water/snow

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I've never worn suede and now I learn that they can be ruined by water/snow. I've had my heart set on a pair of brown bucks for cold weather, and I still want brown bucks, but as I look around it seems that most bbs or indeed bucks in general are in suede.

 

So my questions are how difficult will it be to find bucks in some kinda water resistant material, and secondly what is this:

 

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_101876

 

It says "Water-repellent uppers for easy care. Coated with Scotchgaurd protection."

 

The material isn't listed but it seems to be suede from the picture. I know that there is some kinda spray that you can put on suede to keep it from getting ruined in water, but apparently that doesn't really work/last well and shoes ultimately get ruined. Is this the same thing or doe this protection really work?

Do all suede shoes have such protection as a norm? I worry because my guess is that in some random shop the lady won't know whether these particular suede shoes are safe for water.

post #2 of 15
Suede isn't afraid of water. You can use a spray to treat them.
post #3 of 15
Suede shoes usually don't have water repellent already applied. I'm unsure if the link you posted is even actual suede since it only lists the lining as leather. I've worn suede shoes in wet/snow weather and they have not been damaged, but the exposure was still very limited.
post #4 of 15
water repellent uppers usually means either 1) the material is fake suede/leather and or 2) treated with a silicone/wax coating, to be more water resistant, but not water proof. Sprays can only go so far, there is no spray that fully protects ur suede forever, most of the time if you get urself a spray, u will find yourself re applying many times as the coating can wear off pretty easily after getting wet a few times (depends how wet). Some thicker suedes can take more of a beating, but softer/thinner suedes can lose their "softness" pretty easily.

The real damage in wearing suede in the winter is the salt + snow mixture. The salt used on sidewalks and roads is very damaging to the suede, often leaving a hard white stain that if not taken care of immediately, is a bitch to clean, not to mention, leaving the suede hard and dry.
post #5 of 15
Alfred, the "buck" shoe got its name because it is made of nubuck leather which is very similar to suede I believe. (may be the same thing) That is why all of the ones you are finding looks like suede. The style of shoe you linked is an oxford. Most oxfords don't come with the red sole that is normally found on bucks. The brown buck that you linked doesn't have the red sole so if you don't care about the color of the sole you can just search for a brown oxford shoe.

As for shoe protection I'm not sure if all suede shoes come with water protection. You can buy sno seal or something similar as a water proofer
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbaland View Post

Alfred, the "buck" shoe got its name because it is made of nubuck leather which is very similar to suede I believe. (may be the same thing) That is why all of the ones you are finding looks like suede. The style of shoe you linked is an oxford. Most oxfords don't come with the red sole that is normally found on bucks. The brown buck that you linked doesn't have the red sole so if you don't care about the color of the sole you can just search for a brown oxford shoe.
As for shoe protection I'm not sure if all suede shoes come with water protection. You can buy sno seal or something similar as a water proofer

 

This nubuck, is it safe for wear in water? If so, how do I tell the difference between it and suede?

 

Aren't oxfords the ones with the holes in the front?

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfred001 View Post

This nubuck, is it safe for wear in water? If so, how do I tell the difference between it and suede?

Aren't oxfords the ones with the holes in the front?

Nubuck can stand up to water better than suede. The difference is suede is made from the opposite side of the leather and nubuck is the exterior grain sanded down. Nubuck is flat and velvet like, unlike suede.
post #8 of 15
Thanks nosu for the info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfred001 View Post

This nubuck, is it safe for wear in water? If so, how do I tell the difference between it and suede?

Aren't oxfords the ones with the holes in the front?

I would waterproof nubuck before wearing it in water. And I'm not sure you mean by holes in the front, but that general shape of shoe is called an oxford.
post #9 of 15
^
Which shoe are you talking about?
post #10 of 15
I was referring to buck shoes like the one the OP posted.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbaland View Post

Thanks nosu for the info.
I would waterproof nubuck before wearing it in water. And I'm not sure you mean by holes in the front, but that general shape of shoe is called an oxford.

 

Oh, man. Is there any material that these kind of shoes are made of commonly that is waterproof but has some kind of a rougher texture, not like that very smooth leather.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbaland View Post

I was referring to buck shoes like the one the OP posted.

Those are derby shoes (or bluchers in American), not oxfords.

These are oxfords:

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_299319



But besides that, like I said before: suede isn't afraid of water. (Snow with salt is a different story.)
post #13 of 15
My bad on the shoe style. I see that style referred to as oxfords some times by the companies selling them too. I always thought derbys and bluchers had sleeker (slightly elongated) toe shapes.
post #14 of 15
^
No problem. The distinction doesn't have to do with toe shapes or brogueing etc., it has to do with the "laces part":

Oxfords, characterized by shoelace eyelet tabs that are stitched underneath the vamp contrast with Derbys, or blücher design, characterized by shoelace eyelet tabs that are sewn on top of the vamp.

(From Wikipedia; sorry, too lazy to find a better source smile.gif.)
post #15 of 15
I see. That's good enough for me. Look around and you will see a ton of shoe makers misname the type of shoes they make.
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