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Outdoorsy newbie in need ...

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

All,

 

I have recently taken an interest in my clothing due to a more "networking-centric" job. I am, however, fighting tooth and nail against most of the fashions that I see in stores because they just don't fit my personality. So I need some advice: I want to look like I am going from the boardroom to the hunt club, or maybe leaving the office to have a misty hike in the woods. I found this coat that I like a lot (maybe with some nice jeans or khakis):

 

http://shop.freemanssportingclub.com/collections/previous/products/fw11-sport-coat-glen-hunt-plaid

 

But there is no way I can spend that kind of money on one piece of clothing. Any suggestions on where I should be looking?

post #2 of 13
I would say tweeds, herringbones, and rich plaids like that one in earth tones would work well for you. As long as your job isn't too formal that could work great. I'm going on the premise of a dress code where you could wear that blazer. Many of these fabrics can be found for a lot less, including quality stuff on ebay a lot of the time. Worth looking around.
post #3 of 13
I'd look in thrift and vintage stores. They often have good tweed sport coats. You might try some the classifieds section of the forum too. People like Tweedy have good things for sale. But you'd need to know your measurements.

Cheap stuff from such sources can help you refine your taste and save money. Eventually, when you know what works for you and you have the funds, you can get something custom made that's exactly what you want.
post #4 of 13

Definitely give Tweed a look.  For new clothes try Bookster, Horwood and Shaw and the Harris Tweed Shop.  Any of them will outfit you nicely for far less that Freeman.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

I'd look in thrift and vintage stores. They often have good tweed sport coats. You might try some the classifieds section of the forum too. People like Tweedy have good things for sale. But you'd need to know your measurements.
Cheap stuff from such sources can help you refine your taste and save money. Eventually, when you know what works for you and you have the funds, you can get something custom made that's exactly what you want.

Excellent suggestion.

However, if you are ready to commit to new purchases,
I would advise that you stay away from upstarts like Freeman's
Sporting Club and British vendors like Bookster
( who's shoulders are very padded in violation
of the SF paradigm and my own preferences). Instead,
give serious consideration to retailers who have very
extensive selections of RTW tweeds and the like:

http://theandovershop.com/

and,

http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/home.php
post #6 of 13
There are always cheaper alternatives.

You sound like you want to go with the preppy college professor look.
It also sounds like you've probably never spent more than $50 on an article of clothing.

So, do not overlook popular preppy retailers as a starting point (Brooks, Banana Republic, JCrew, Land's End)
I suggest you get some catalogs or visit their site, and start getting better ideas.
post #7 of 13

I dabble in this look often. Tweed in the browns and earthy tones, for sure. Shoes are quintessential to this look, a good blend is the wingtip boot. Try a recent article on dappered.com for a solid, very cheap recommendation (note: shoe snobs, of which I am one, need not profess about this particular shoe... however, if you, the OP, can afford some AE Daltons, or Alden Indy's, then that's a solid choice): http://dappered.com/2012/08/in-person-jcpenneys-stafford-wingtip-boot/

 

 

 

Dark denim is your friend, and corduroy for the winter is a welcome choice. Dark brown and grays.

 

For jackets/sport coats, the above recommendations are great, and I've found a number of solid tweed choices via ebay. Stick with the dark greens (loden, forest, etc), the earthy browns, the khakis, etc. It's one of my favorite looks when winter arrives and I'm afforded the weather in which to don the requisite clothing.

post #8 of 13
As people above have said Bookster would be a good choice for tweed, have lots of colour choices and are much cheeper than the jacket in your link.

Charlie
post #9 of 13

And while you're at it, avoid the SF paradigm.  The less said about clothing tyrants the better.

post #10 of 13

Filson icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

post #11 of 13

That is a good choice right there. A tweed sport coat fits into that description, try Brooks Brothers or a Harris Tweed.

post #12 of 13

That is a good choice right there. A tweed sport coat fits into that description, try Brooks Brothers or a Harris Tweed.

post #13 of 13

I hear you and resisted for years. It doesn’t mean you have to go with the latest fashion trend, in fact I would advise against it. For the most part my dress would be considered traditional with wool slacks that have a good drape, button down oxford and best tie I can find, and a sport coat. Every thing properly fitting and somewhat decent quality then you will look and feel good. When the occasion requires a grey or charcoal suit with a white spread collar shirt. Once I stopped trying to look like I owned stock in LL Bean and Orvis and started to dress properly people immediately changed how they started to interact with me. For the better. I now think there is some truth to the statement keep the city in the city and country in the country.

 

I have regularly gone from the boardroom or committee meeting to the Hunt Club. Not to hunt pen raised ditch chickens because it could hardly be called hunting and the dog often catches them before they get their fat asses in the air, but to shoot sporting clays. There is nothing that functions as a crossover clothing that carries over to that activity let alone hiking in the woods. Rough clothes like cords and tweeds are fine for a couple of months of the year but what about the rest of the time? I do like to wear dress boots a lot, especially shell and wingtips. If you’re not comfortable with wingtips yet go for a perf captoe or plain toe. Just make sure it is a decent dress boot or chukka.  While I used to wear large sports watches as a statement I now wear dress watches when dressed for work. However also as a statement I use a Filson 258 briefcase daily and twice a week carry a Filson Pullman with my shooting clothes in it to change into after work and drive to the skeet field on Tuesday and the hunt club on Thursday. Another area I still resist is the dress overcoat and I still go with more of a function over form than looking like a city boy, AKA flatlander. If not wearing a sports jacket in the fall or winter I have been known to put on my Filson black oilcloth weekender jacket instead. Good luck and take your time. Eventually you will develop your own sense of style which could be dramatically different than mine. You have to go with what you’re comfortable with and YOU think makes you look good. And that will change over time.

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