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Reasons why New York Sucks - Page 617

post #9241 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

it's soooo nice out. Drinks on the roof shall happen.
That doesn't suck.
cheers.gif
post #9242 of 11477
Any particularly good Indian restaurants in NYC?
post #9243 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Any particularly good Indian restaurants in NYC?

Junoon has a Michelin star. I live right by it and still have yet to give it a try...
post #9244 of 11477
we found a place in W'Burg that is awesome.



at least I think it is awesome, I wouldn't be surprised if some Indian guy was like "it's actually mehhh"
post #9245 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

we found a place in W'Burg that is awesome.



at least I think it is awesome, I wouldn't be surprised if some Indian guy was like "it's actually mehhh"

Always a problem with ethnic food. Go to a Chinese Chinese restaurant (as opposed to an Americanized one) and you take your life in your hands.
post #9246 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Always a problem with ethnic food. Go to a Chinese Chinese restaurant (as opposed to an Americanized one) and you take your life in your hands.

I'm not sure if the second comment is really meant to relate to the first one (and by extension to gomestar's post) or if they're independent observations.

With respect to the second, in LA we have a ginormous Asian community with tons of non-Americanized, "Chinese Chinese" restaurants. I've had fantastic meals at some of them, so-so meals at others. I never felt I was taking my life in my hands any more than when I eat at "non-ethnic" restaurants. Not sure why NY would be particularly different.
post #9247 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

I know. My point is that it is saving you hours of going to dmv, filling out forms and waiting in their shitty waiting room. So, is this alternate process worth the extra $? Do you value your free time more than the additional cost?
I don't know if this is still true, but the last time I only renewed my license, I was in and out of the DMV Express in less than 15 minutes. The last time I went it took longer, because I got the "enhanced" driver's license.
post #9248 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Always a problem with ethnic food. Go to a Chinese Chinese restaurant (as opposed to an Americanized one) and you take your life in your hands.

I'm not sure if the second comment is really meant to relate to the first one (and by extension to gomestar's post) or if they're independent observations.

Things that Americans like are not necessarily things that are popular in a cuisine's home country. Consequently, a lot of ethnic recipes get adapted for local tastes and, so, aren't considered particularly great by people who grew up in that country eating that cuisine. In New Zealand, Mexican restaurants serve lamb tacos with mint sauce. We've all been subjected to, ahh, whimsical adaptations of well-known dishes while traveling.

So, as Gomestar notes, an ethnic restaurant that's popular isn't necessarily going to be any "good" in the sense of authentic. In fact, there's probably an inverse correlation. Do not, under any circumstances, take an Italian to Olive Garden.

Quote:
With respect to the second, in LA we have a ginormous Asian community with tons of non-Americanized, "Chinese Chinese" restaurants. I've had fantastic meals at some of them, so-so meals at others. I never felt I was taking my life in my hands any more than when I eat at "non-ethnic" restaurants. Not sure why NY would be particularly different.

Maybe you're just tougher than I am. But Chinese Chinese restaurants in particular are a culinary minefield. I don't think correctly-prepared drunken prawns are even legal in the U.S..
post #9249 of 11477
If sushi is legal I can't see how druken prawn or druken crab is not though I have not come to a single one in NYC that can do it. NYC is Cantonese cuisine heavy anyway...
post #9250 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Things that Americans like are not necessarily things that are popular in a cuisine's home country. Consequently, a lot of ethnic recipes get adapted for local tastes and, so, aren't considered particularly great by people who grew up in that country eating that cuisine. In New Zealand, Mexican restaurants serve lamb tacos with mint sauce. We've all been subjected to, ahh, whimsical adaptations of well-known dishes while traveling.

Have you seen the video where they have old Chinese people and some young american chinese people eat Panda Express?

The youngins are all say "Bleh this is not authentic, it is terrible, I can't even eat it" and the old people are like "mmm, this is tasty...not how we do it at home, but yummy"
post #9251 of 11477

I saw that buzzfeed video. That young Chinese guy sitting in between the two girls, was so punchable. They did one with Mexicans and taco bells as well. 

post #9252 of 11477
The Mexicans weren't having it. I suspect Panda Express is a closer approximation, though. Maybe they should have had the Mexicans try Baja Fresh.
post #9253 of 11477
it's easier to make something "tastier" by adding "flavors", which in America 99% of the times means creamier, heavier, and more sauce. To make something that taste great and light, without double down on cream/sauce is much harder and less appreciate in the US (just look at most of the Italian restaurant in the US).

I have not come across any Chinese restaurant in the US that can do it right, they can taste 80% right on the spot but the after taste has always been wrong. I am not saying as in the case of explosive diarrhea, but rather on how the flavor should develop outside just the first bite, and it should left your body feel as light/clean as if you just had ate salad. Not trying to be philosophical about it, though I honestly don't know how to express all these things well in English.
post #9254 of 11477
Quote:
Originally Posted by clee1982 View Post

I have not come across any Chinese restaurant in the US that can do it right, they can taste 80% right on the spot but the after taste has always been wrong. I am not saying as in the case of explosive diarrhea, but rather on how the flavor should develop outside just the first bite, and it should left your body feel as light/clean as if you just had ate salad. Not trying to be philosophical about it, though I honestly don't know how to express all these things well in English.

Not to mention that half the dishes on American Chinese restaurant menus were invented in the U.S. and don't exist in China at all.
post #9255 of 11477
At the Easter parade. It's more crowded than I remember. Last time I went was 7 years or so ago.
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