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Reasons why New York Sucks - Page 598

post #8956 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

it's easy to shit on the likes of Budakkan, Tao, Morimoto, and that general theme of restaurants, but when you have a group of people coming in from out of town who want to eat at 9 (or 10? they can't decide) and who is going to be a group of 6 (or 8? or maybe 4?), these are the restaurants I usually turn to.
That's a good point. If a group of friends wants a lively setting for a large table, it would be a great option. For a dinner with the wife, I would steer away.

Hakkasan is also delicious but the setting is also weird loungey/clubby and the prices are high.
post #8957 of 11466
if you're going to do the Asian route, I'd check out Red Farm, which is pretty much what i tell everybody. It reminds me of that type of Asian-fusion that Budakkan and others do (or did) so well, but without the bridge and tunnel crowd and without the douchy bro-parties that happen at Budakkan.
post #8958 of 11466

Hakkasan doesn't mention any prices on their website - what would you estimate the price at per person for 4 including a bottle of wine? May also just try Red Farm, but can't make reservations there.

post #8959 of 11466
It's silly expensive IMO
http://www.menupages.com/restaurants/hakkasan/menu

If you do end up going, focus on the dim sum. they're really excellent. And expensive lol
Edited by gdl203 - 3/8/15 at 6:03pm
post #8960 of 11466
I always figured Hakkasan is for people with large expense accounts to wine and dine clients. Do people actually spend their own money there? I went once just to try it but it is not worth returning. I'm not a fan of Red Farm, but I can see why it can appeal to some. For Chinese food, I prefer Oriental Garden but ordering food there can be confusing if you don't know what to expect. Has anyone tried the new Mission Chinese?

If you are looking for Mexican food, what about Calexico? They have a restaurant now on the LES.

Of the new places that opened up, I like Gato - Bobby Flays new place. The small plates have great flavor and I want to go back to try the rest. I would have a dinner just of the small plates. The dinner sized dishes are not nearly as good.
post #8961 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

I would have a dinner just of the small plates. The dinner sized dishes are not nearly as good.

in my opinion, this is true for 95% of restaurants. Load up on small plates, starters, appetizers, and pastas. Ignore that $40 pork chop and that $38 Bronzino.
post #8962 of 11466
Isn't there a pok pok in NYC now? Not Chinese, but if Asian food is underrepresented where you come from, it will still scratch the itch.
post #8963 of 11466

Yes. I think it recently received a Michelin star. Not sure how the reservations work, but I went months ago and we waited (at least) 1 hour to eat. I've heard it's a common experience when diners go there.



The food is good though.
post #8964 of 11466
I visit hakkasan with friends primarily for amusement purposes. Try the smoky negroni!
post #8965 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Mexican is not one of NY's great strengths. Dos Caminos and Rosa Mexicana are OK, as is Zocalo (if that's even still open).

But, really, it's not worth going out of your way for.

Most Mexican food is pretty bad everywhere in the States. The American version of Mexican food is mostly Sonoran street food and largely consists of the same five ingredients in different shapes. It's as if everyone thought that Chinese food consisted entirely of noodles.

Even most of the "good" Mexican restaurants I have been to in the U.S. primarily offer amped-up versions of burritos, enchiladas, tacos, etc.. Not that there's anything wrong with that -- a good burrito is both an engineering and a culinary marvel. But Mexican food is a lot more than that.

Pre-columbian Mexico had the most complex cuisine in the new world. Even now, there is quite a lot of regional variation. Spanish, and probably more importantly, French influence combined with this indigenous cuisine to create a fusion which is always interesting and occasionally spectacular. This is most noticeable around Mexico City, for obvious reasons, I guess. But it can show up anywhere. Some years ago I was at a hotel restaurant in a small town in Yucatan. We weren't expecting much and were amazed to see a menu as inventive as you'd find anywhere. In particular, I remember a local venison with a surprisingly complex mole. The presentation wasn't quite up to what you might find in a Michelin-starred restaurant but the food itself easily passed muster.

I have been to a few U.S. restaurants that try to capture some of this. They mostly fail because everyone goes to them looking for tacos and burritos.
post #8966 of 11466
The next phase has begun. Rain 5 days a week until June when it gets humid as fuck every day with surprise afternoon monsoons until November.
Edited by patrickBOOTH - 3/9/15 at 5:49am
post #8967 of 11466
Everyone is so slow and mellow this morning. This is what a simple one hour disruption in sleep pattern does to people.
post #8968 of 11466

post #8969 of 11466
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Everyone is so slow and mellow this morning. This is what a simple one hour disruption in sleep pattern does to people.

There is no damned point or purpose to it at all. I hate this.
post #8970 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Everyone is so slow and mellow this morning. This is what a simple one hour disruption in sleep pattern does to people.

DLS is part of it, but I think part of it is also the fact that people walked out their doors yesterday and today and realized that it's not 8 degrees out, and that a civilization does indeed exist.
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