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Reasons why New York Sucks - Page 669

post #10021 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Dopey, sounds like you received medical attention, but I would keep that wound unbound, open to the air, and as clean as possible until you're sure there's no infection. I've seen dog bites turn ugly including one fellow who developing sepsis from a tiny puncture that he bandaged.

Sorry this happened to you.

lefty 

I've had so many doctors tell me to keep bandages on and that had only made things worse. When I was in college I had this mole on my shoulder removed because I was afraid it was cancerous (it wasn't) and he told me to keep the bandage there for three days. Day two I am doing some homework and I kept smelling this odd smell. It was driving me insane and I couldn't trace the source. It turns out it was my festering mole hole. I ripped that bandage off and scrubbed it in the shower. Now, any time I get a laceration by a doctor or something else I keep it open to the air and wash it well.
post #10022 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

retractible leashes are a Florida (old people) thing. I rarely see them in NY, even with the old Mexican women and their Chihuahuas or Maltese that live in my neighborhood.



a semi-active dog + a 15' lead means they're in the road and into a car.

At the same time I can't stand people who don't know how to work with a short leash and don't mind people walking.
post #10023 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

That's awful. How is your son around dogs now? My family was pretty freaked out and I am not sure they are going to settle down so soon. Today they kept crossing the street when they saw big dogs. I hope he gets/got over it.

And to add to the fun, I get to go on a bandage run now as I have been through tons of supplies changing the dressings twice a day since this happened Saturday afternoon.

Are you going to initiate protocols to have it put down? Imagine if your child's face had been the closest thing. Next time it might be.
post #10024 of 11466
so dramatic. No, a bite isn't enough to get a dog put down. There's about 4-5K bites reported in NYC each year, it happens.




dopey, hope you heel heal well. Could have been worse, could have been your hand. Reminds me of a friend who was bitten by his GF's little dog (she was holding it, and unknown to him the dog was guarding her when he reached out to pet the dog). Little thing did a number on his hand, which normally sucks, but he was a piano student at Juilliard at the time.
Edited by gomestar - 5/27/15 at 7:37am
post #10025 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

Are you going to initiate protocols to have it put down? Imagine if your child's face had been the closest thing. Next time it might be.
My wife is dealing with this. Police are pissed that I didn't go to the hospital and file an immediate reports so hey could investigate. I would do nothing but I am coming around to thinking I should file a report so there is some kind of record/process in place in case this is habitual as I have no idea how recurrent it is with this dog. My own view is that this dog is more or less as likely to bite again in the same circumstances as any other bulldog.

As for biting a kid, I doubt he would have felt threatened by and attacked a kid in the same circumstances (#maleprivilege). But as I said, I don't speak dog so I really don't know why he bit.
post #10026 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

in case this is habitual as I have no idea how recurrent it is with this dog. My own view is that this dog is more or less as likely to bite again in the same circumstances as any other bulldog.

As for biting a kid, I doubt he would have felt threatened by and attacked a kid in the same circumstances (#maleprivilege). But as I said, I don't speak dog so I really don't know why he bit.

top line is important ... is this a first time thing or are there repeated human aggression issues. I believe the policy is to monitor the dog's behavior for a number of days (10 or so) and report back.

Then again, it is a bulldog, so in a year or so it'll be too fat and slow to go after people.


quickly popping out of doors onto the sidewalk does spook dogs, I've noticed this many times. Not sure why, I also don't speak dog.
post #10027 of 11466
A pit almost took my leg off when one was tied to scaffolding with no owner in sight. It was dark with no lighting under the scaffolding and I was walking very briskly towards it. I didn't see it until my father said, "watch out for the dog". It lunged at me and snapped. My pents would have been ruined if I didn't have cat-like reflexed (without cat-like eyesight).
post #10028 of 11466

There are a lot of reasons that bite occurred and my best guess is that out-of-control aggression is far down the list. What did the owner say? 

 

I'm not particularly sentimental about one Bulldog, but would hate to see a dog destroyed because of an incompetent owner or a simple mistake or accident.

 

lefty

post #10029 of 11466
For me, the angle is: This cannot be allowed to happen.

Whether it's the owner's fault or the dog's, and whether the dog "normally" wouldn't do it, is not that relevant. I don't care if it bit because of uncontrolled aggression, I care that it bit.

If dogs can get away with biting a stranger, then more stangers will be bitten.

I'd be OK with some form of punishment for the owner along with/instead of for the dog, but it needs to be very strongly discouraged/punished. If a person assaults you he/she could spend years in jail, so think of the punishment in that context.



For the record I love dogs, and they tend to love me. My sister has a dog that she loves dearly but should not be allowed around people because he sometimes unpredictably freaks out. I don't care how sweet he is at heart. Good luck convincing her of that........ ellipsis.......

P.S. I have not specifically advocated for killing the dog. I don't have a plan. But maybe even just one bite of a stranger should be sufficient to mandate a "bite cage"* when in public.

*Made up name I am making up to mean a hockey mask type thing that makes it impossible to bite people.
post #10030 of 11466
You jumped right to putting it down. As you say there are other things that can be done before killing it such as putting it in a less stressful environment than Manhattan.
post #10031 of 11466
If putting the dog down would make the owner sad and hopefully more attentive, I'm all for it. Having been attacked by a dog and chased years later, I'm very wary of piece of shit owners. Unfortunately for the dog, it has to be the one that goes, not the owner. At the very least ruin the owner's summer with a nice lawsuit for the emotional distress the incident caused you and your family.
post #10032 of 11466
At the very least the attack should be reported to the police. There may have been prior incidents involving this dog.
post #10033 of 11466

We had that conversation with the police when our boy was bitten.  Good luck getting the dog or owner in any kind of trouble... it won't happen.  Many states have one-bite rule that automatically protects owner and dog for the first bite (NY is one of them).  Then, after that, there are so many caveats to the law that makes it pretty much impossible for the victim to get anywhere with legal proceedings : the dog felt threatened, it was teased, etc...   Even though our little boy was allowed by the owners to pet the dog that bit him in the face, the police said we'd get nowhere as they could simply argue that he was teasing the dog, provoking a reaction.    Lawmakers must love their dogs, because they're incredibly protected.

post #10034 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

there are other things that can be done before killing it such as putting it in a less stressful environment than Manhattan.
When I was a kid one of our family dogs couldn't handle city life so we shipped her off to our farm where she flourished. Totally different dog.
post #10035 of 11466
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You jumped right to putting it down. As you say there are other things that can be done before killing it such as putting it in a less stressful environment than Manhattan.

This is not accurate. I said "Are you going to initiate protocols to have it put down? Imagine if your child's face had been the closest thing. Next time it might be."

I thought it was a pretty much automatic thing that they get put down if its reported. Doesn't mean I advocate putting them down. I do advocate reporting it.

The subsequent posts about how nothing actually happens are a surprise to me.
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