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What are the best activities to add to your resume? - Page 2

post #16 of 41
Is tough mudder really that hard? Might work in certain areas (seems a lot of finance bros are pretty in to it) but as far as actually finishing one, it seems like a lot of not very athletic people don't have trouble making it across the line. Would definitely not put it down if its something you just did once...or even if you have done your local one a few times. Unless you have traveled to be able to do it more than once per year, its probably not a good resume thing.

The thing that almost always came up in interviews that was on my one line of interests was Cyclocross. It is far more specific than "I Like Bikes" and is something different that a lot of people were curious about. Sailing came up as well, but that was more because it was in the body of my resume since I was the captain of the college team. Things like Tennis are just throwaway answers for most resumes since it just equates with "Oh no way man, you own a tennis racket too?".

Basically, if you have something on that line that sounds interesting, it can help give you something to talk about in the interview. Something that helps you pass the test of "do I like interacting with this person".
post #17 of 41

The "talking points" is really why a "Passions" line item is super important for the resume.  You can put a varied list of activities (for me its Traveling, martial arts, European Art, Poker, Asian American activism) and hopefully something will catch your interviewer's eye.  So many decisions are made just on the basis of "I like this guy" as opposed to "Well he's got a 0.2 higher GPA"

post #18 of 41
My resume's interests section reads: Murders & Asphyxiation, Sadomasochism, Various Pomades
post #19 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

The thing that almost always came up in interviews that was on my one line of interests was Cyclocross. It is far more specific than "I Like Bikes" and is something different that a lot of people were curious about. Sailing came up as well, but that was more because it was in the body of my resume since I was the captain of the college team. Things like Tennis are just throwaway answers for most resumes since it just equates with "Oh no way man, you own a tennis racket too?".

Exactly, "Captain of sailing team" is a lot better than Sailing. If you like running and jog like 5k every so often at a 10 minute pace, then don't even bother putting it down. If you race (and especially place), then worthwhile to include. I want to see a drive to succeed in personal life that mirrors all the BS you put in the rest of the resume...)
post #20 of 41
I'd say only add activities if you have accomplished something in them. No one cares if you do this or that in your spare time.
post #21 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoozah View Post

I'd say only add activities if you have accomplished something in them. No one cares if you do this or that in your spare time.

Agree with this... blown out activities (i.e. those with bullet points) are only good for something with achievements.  

 

Interests (Tough Mudder probably falls into this) should all just be listed on one line at the bottom.

post #22 of 41

Re the athletics section:
I think it depends what the resume is aimed at. I assume you're going straight for a job, but from talking to my advisors regarding scholarships (Marshall, Rhodes, etc.), athletic involvement can be a big boost - but really only if it's varsity level or, at least, club level. Obviously this probably means nothing outside of the academic world.

 

I think one of the things that has really helped my resume is research. I've been involved with it for two years and though it's probably easier to get involved when you're studying engineering, I'm sure there's still other good possibilities in other fields. But I'm not sure if you have the time to begin that.

post #23 of 41
Yeah, unless you've won an olympic gold medal I'd leave this stuff off completely unless its related to the job you want.
post #24 of 41
Tough Mudder, seriously? Why not throw your bench press on there why you're at it. A resume is not a fucking list of your weekend activities, it's a relevant summary of your professional career.
post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

Tough Mudder, seriously? Why not throw your bench press on there why you're at it. A resume is not a fucking list of your weekend activities, it's a relevant summary of your professional career.

Plus fukkin 1^^^.

I just had to Google Tough Mudder. If I saw your resume and Googled that and saw the results, I would dump your resume....UNLESS your work experience was stellar and relevant!
post #26 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoozah View Post

I'd say only add activities if you have accomplished something in them. No one cares if you do this or that in your spare time.

Yeah. Depends on age as well. I've looked at some resumes recently and seen stuff like "boxing" etc. from candidates that are in their late 20s/early 30s legal professionals. It borderline annoys me. I think the suggestion that it adds some talking points to the interview is good, but be careful.

I guess I have an impression that at a certain point in your life this isn't a college interview where I want to hear about whether you are a well rounded and beautiful unique snowflake. What I want to know is are you a serious, hard working, tough professional and do you have skills that apply to what we are doing? Otherwise I don't care what you do in your free time (frankly you shouldn't have so much free time that you are teaching the underprivileged to play the xylophone- you should be working!).
post #27 of 41
team sports (shows you can work with others) and something like a triathlon, or that you hiked a big peak, shows you challenge yourself.
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post

Yeah. Depends on age as well. I've looked at some resumes recently and seen stuff like "boxing" etc. from candidates that are in their late 20s/early 30s legal professionals. It borderline annoys me. I think the suggestion that it adds some talking points to the interview is good, but be careful.
I guess I have an impression that at a certain point in your life this isn't a college interview where I want to hear about whether you are a well rounded and beautiful unique snowflake. What I want to know is are you a serious, hard working, tough professional and do you have skills that apply to what we are doing? Otherwise I don't care what you do in your free time (frankly you shouldn't have so much free time that you are teaching the underprivileged to play the xylophone- you should be working!).

I disagree- I like to see someone does something in their off time - but as I said before, "boxing" is a useless entry - even "competes in boxing matches" is better since it actually shows some drive. "Boxing" could be cardio-boxing at Equinox.
post #29 of 41
Hey- it all depends. I guess I am "hating", but certain stuff strikes me as borderline unprofessional. I like fishing, but I don't put that on my resume. Maybe that's a mistake, but it just seems out of place to me. Things like charity work or certain non-professional achievements make sense to me. I get how certain personal interests and achievements that don't fit into a box might be useful to include. You wrote a successful graphic novel or you restore classic cars? That seems kind of cool to me and I might be interested in the right situation. A guy I work with has written a bunch of guides/books to Mac computers- it's not strictly related to what we do, but it does say something important about the guy so I think that makes sense.

But tell me you ran a marathon? Whoop-de-do. So have I and everybody's nanna. It's lame and I feel the same way about the boxing thing- I belonged to a boxing gym in college and boxed on and off for years. The woman who threw it on her resume that I saw recently struck me as wanting to make a very transparent attempt to seem tough or aggressive and I was not impressed.

I think ultimately we agree here: don't just throw some useless shite on there to seem well rounded.
post #30 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

Tough Mudder, seriously? Why not throw your bench press on there why you're at it. A resume is not a fucking list of your weekend activities, it's a relevant summary of your professional career.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post

Plus fukkin 1^^^.
I just had to Google Tough Mudder. If I saw your resume and Googled that and saw the results, I would dump your resume....UNLESS your work experience was stellar and relevant!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTGuy View Post

Yeah. Depends on age as well. I've looked at some resumes recently and seen stuff like "boxing" etc. from candidates that are in their late 20s/early 30s legal professionals. It borderline annoys me. I think the suggestion that it adds some talking points to the interview is good, but be careful.
I guess I have an impression that at a certain point in your life this isn't a college interview where I want to hear about whether you are a well rounded and beautiful unique snowflake. What I want to know is are you a serious, hard working, tough professional and do you have skills that apply to what we are doing? Otherwise I don't care what you do in your free time (frankly you shouldn't have so much free time that you are teaching the underprivileged to play the xylophone- you should be working!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by imolazhp_ci View Post

team sports (shows you can work with others) and something like a triathlon, or that you hiked a big peak, shows you challenge yourself.



interesting take - I figure that there are things that will tell me about your personality, and that is probably as important as your proffetional achievements. I am really interested in stamina, social skills, mental toughness. so I'd like to see things that would indicate those. but I pretty much can't find people who have exactly the relevant work history that I need, so I am looking for something close, pluse the right attitude.


I remember reading a good quote, something like "hire for attitude and train"
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