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Mistakes you made when updating your wardrobe - Page 2

post #16 of 85
Slowing down is good advice. And if you're losing weight, it's doubly important.

After two years of losing weight I hit a plateau and thought I was at my natural weight. I bought a bunch of suits, SCs, trousers and shirts that I am now -- two years after that -- taking a severe beating on and somewhat slowly replacing.

One thing I've learned is that the deals never stop coming. Don't jump on items just because they're a great price for a quality piece. Have patience. There are more where that came from.
post #17 of 85
1. Buying too much without learning enough.

2. Buying shoes I could not wear for 24 hours without complaint.

3. Trying to size down in jackets for a slimmer look. Restriction of movement is not cool.
post #18 of 85
On top of the comments about diving in too quickly I'd add thinking that buying cheap doesn't mean buying twice.

Far better to acquire a quality but limited set of staples that you can use as a foundation than any number of cheaper items of a limited quality and lifespan.
post #19 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beatlegeuse View Post

Biggest mistake I, and I'm sure many others here, made when first upgrading my wardrobe was buying too much too soon. I discovered SF and realized my clothes sucked, so I went on a shopping spree in the first 2 or 3 months buying all kinds of new trousers and shoes and ties and shirts and so on. That was just about 2 years ago, and guess what....I don't think I even own anything from that initial shopping spree phase anymore. Maybe I still have one or two ties and a few shirts, but all the shoes and trousers and everything else have either been resold (usually at a loss) or donated.
Based on my experiences, the best advice I can give to newcomers is to SLOW DOWN, don't buy something just because it's a good deal, and don't make any impulse purchases. First, concentrate on getting the basics (this Manton thread is a good place to start) before you go crazy buying everything in sight. Take some time, try a lot of different brands, find out what really works for your body type, and slowly cultivate your own personal style.
I wish I had taken the time to do all that when I first started really caring about my clothes and putting some serious thought into my wardrobe. I am just now getting to a point where I'm really comfortable in what I own, so be patient and let the transformation happen naturally.

 

Word.

 

I did OK with shoes, but not with shirts.

post #20 of 85
Slow down is great advice. I went hog wild on ties and pocket squares, I'm still pruning my collection years later.

My big tip is don't hunt for sales. Hunt for what you really want, you'll end up happier with you choice in the long term. Pursuing sale items means you're limiting yourself to sale items, at some point a piece you really wanted might be on sale, then you should go for it. But in general, get what you really want, use it as a chance to forgo buying more and just spend that extra amount on that perfect item.
post #21 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by aw82 View Post

Posting pictures of my outfits on styleforum.

 

HAHAHA this just made my day. gold.

 

as an aside, cheaping out on tailoring. now i get all my clothes tailored; widening trouser waists, hemming up trousers/jacket sleeves, shirts, etc. emphasis is the FIT.

post #22 of 85
Buying a lot of skin tight clothes when I was young and fit.
post #23 of 85
+1 to buying too much too fast.

The single most important thing other than that is to find a good local tailor, especially if you are trying to save by thrifting/ebaying.

Also, as others have said, find what you want and get that, rather than what is in the clearance rack. It's definitely cheaper in the long run.
post #24 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by sliq View Post

HAHAHA this just made my day. gold.

as an aside, cheaping out on tailoring. now i get all my clothes tailored; widening trouser waists, hemming up trousers/jacket sleeves, shirts, etc. emphasis is the FIT.

Amen, I have a tendency to buy new stuff, when in fact I don't wear the stuff I have to its full potential (or even as often as I should) because of little fit niggles that I'm honestly too lazy to drop off at the tailor.

I recently decided to stop buying so much stuff and simply get more use out of what I have already.
post #25 of 85
Buying a barong in the Philippines and wearing it in Bristol, UK. Friends saying "What the fuck are you wearing Mike?"
post #26 of 85
Not buying with a fully coordinated look in mind. It is too easy to get attracted to "pretty things", a nice pocket square, belt or shoes that don't quite go with anything you own.
post #27 of 85
+1000000000000000000000000 to buying too much too soon.

Even if you resell it, it's at a fraction of what you paid.


The dreaded compromise for a good deal. <- never again!!

When something doesn't fit perfectly, but since it's a great price you buy it anyways hoping it'll work. It won't. It'll just rot away in your closet.


SF also can be a huge problem.

What some people like, or what's considered by the rules might not fit you as a person. Take the time to develop your own style
post #28 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by f800gs View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The best thing I have learned so far is fit, fit, fit.

This is very solid advice.....except most people have no clue what a good "fit" is.

There's many a clown walking down the street in his ill-fitting suit, thinking he has a perfectly fitting ensemble.
post #29 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

Not buying with a fully coordinated look in mind. It is too easy to get attracted to "pretty things", a nice pocket square, belt or shoes that don't quite go with anything you own.

Ah, but you can always do a "sprezz" with that wonderful, outlandish, pretty item that matches nothing.
post #30 of 85
Since I was on a tight budget when I joined here it wasn't about buying too much too soon.

My first post-SF purchases were great items and I still wear some of them. I still own the first 'real shoes' I bought using SF knowledge and wear them frequently, having been resoled once and reheeled twice. AE Lamberts.

My advice for a newcomer:

Don't go no break on your pants. When I first joined people told me to go NO BREAK on my pants and that I should insist that my alteration person hems them as such. I did this. I still own some of those pants and they look retarded when I wear them. Also, people will think you're wearing the wrong size pants. Instead just go for a slight break.

Don't be too entranced by a brand. There are lots of very ugly jackets/suits made well by good brands. In the end, the only one who will know what brand you wear is you. Maybe some clothing nerds too.

You won't find anything you like at Macy's. Just forget about the store. I spent a lot of money (at that time) trying to find a good fitting shirt made from nice fabric at Macy's. It was impossible. Just get MTM for shirts if you are somewhere near a weight/fitness level you are comfortable with for at least a bit of time.

Properly fitting pants made a world of difference for me. I was lucky since the ultra slim Incotex and Mabitex fit me extremely well and I lived really close to a daffy's. Daffy's is going out of buisness so I can't offer advice for brands.
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