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What are the foods that burn belly fat for men? - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolarrow View Post

What the hell is "12 stones"?

 +1 laugh.gif  i was thinking the same thing

post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post


Right, because bread doesn't have to be chewed, processed in the stomach, or broken down into glucose.

What you're saying is mostly correct, but poorly explained. What you're referring to is the thermic effect of food - the increase in metabolic rate due to processing food. Upwards of 30% of calories from proteins are used to process them, while <10% of carbs are used, and fats are some amount lower than that. This is partly why high-protein diets are recommended for fat loss. But this is all mostly irrelevant since TEF has nothing to do with targeting belly fat.

 

Hey BBSLM,

 

You're right, my explanation was poor. It was a 'rapid fire response' and I suppose I should have done a bit more refreshing/research before posting, but I felt it would be simple explanation and would get the point across.

 

Of course, bread has to be chewed and processed, but carbs are more easily broken down into glucose than proteins are into amino acids. I'll go out at a limb again, because it's years since I did biochemistry and I don't feel it necessary to research much further (will dig deeper if I have to), but if I remember correctly the chemical bonds that bind the simple sugars to form the complex sugars and ultimately the carb molecules are much easier to break down thereby requiring less energy.

 

The amino acid chains on the other had fold into complex structures which are difficult to break down and hence require significantly more energy.

 

Also, although not as significant, I do not believe that TEF has nothing to do with targeting belly fat. The more foods you eat with a higher TEF, the less chance of belly fat accumulation and the higher your chances of losing more belly fat.

 

Thanks for your feedback as I'm now more interested in the subject (didn't know up to 30% of protein and <10% of carbs were used to support basic metabolic processes). I will be looking into this further, but do you have a quick resource I could check out?

post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquidus View Post


But wouldn't the piece of meat have more calories itself than the piece of bread? eh.gif

 

Hey Liquidus,

 

Proteins contain 4 calories per gram, carbohydrates 4 calories per gram and fats 9 calories per gram. So assuming a piece of bread with a grams worth of carbohydrate and a piece of meat with a grams worth of protein, they will both have the same amount of calories i.e 4 calories. However, going on BBSLM's update, 30% of the calories from the meat will be used up in metabolic processes compared to under 10% from the piece of bread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolarrow View Post

What the hell is "12 stones"?

 

coolarrow, a stone is about 6.34kg, so basically he weighs about 76kg or about 168 pounds.

post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonard Johnes View Post

Hey BBSLM,

You're right, my explanation was poor. It was a 'rapid fire response' and I suppose I should have done a bit more refreshing/research before posting, but I felt it would be simple explanation and would get the point across.

Of course, bread has to be chewed and processed, but carbs are more easily broken down into glucose than proteins are into amino acids. I'll go out at a limb again, because it's years since I did biochemistry and I don't feel it necessary to research much further (will dig deeper if I have to), but if I remember correctly the chemical bonds that bind the simple sugars to form the complex sugars and ultimately the carb molecules are much easier to break down thereby requiring less energy.

The amino acid chains on the other had fold into complex structures which are difficult to break down and hence require significantly more energy.

Also, although not as significant, I do not believe that TEF has nothing to do with targeting belly fat. The more foods you eat with a higher TEF, the less chance of belly fat accumulation and the higher your chances of losing more belly fat.

Thanks for your feedback as I'm now more interested in the subject (didn't know up to 30% of protein and <10% of carbs were used to support basic metabolic processes). I will be looking into this further, but do you have a quick resource I could check out?

Yea, like I said, the message was correct, just poorly explained/worded.

For references, anything by Lyle McDonald. But for this topic specifically you can try the TEF section of this article:

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/metabolic-rate-overview.html
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonard Johnes View Post

Hey Liquidus,

Proteins contain 4 calories per gram, carbohydrates 4 calories per gram and fats 9 calories per gram. So assuming a piece of bread with a grams worth of carbohydrate and a piece of meat with a grams worth of protein, they will both have the same amount of calories i.e 4 calories. However, going on BBSLM's update, 30% of the calories from the meat will be used up in metabolic processes compared to under 10% from the piece of bread.

I think his question was more of a practical one.

A piece of bread has, what, 100 calories? So accounting for TEF you're looking at about 90 calories. A 4oz top sirloin, for example, has about 240 calories, so accounting for TEF you're looking at 170ish.

But nobody eats just a single piece of bread, or just a 4oz steak, and protein is more satiating that carbs anyway, so the comparison is very realistic.
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post


Yea, like I said, the message was correct, just poorly explained/worded.
For references, anything by Lyle McDonald. But for this topic specifically you can try the TEF section of this article:
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/metabolic-rate-overview.html


Thanks for that. Have had a quick read through. Have left it open so I can go through it more thoroughly.

post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post


I think his question was more of a practical one.
A piece of bread has, what, 100 calories? So accounting for TEF you're looking at about 90 calories. A 4oz top sirloin, for example, has about 240 calories, so accounting for TEF you're looking at 170ish.
But nobody eats just a single piece of bread, or just a 4oz steak, and protein is more satiating that carbs anyway, so the comparison is very realistic.


True, no one eats just a single piece of bread, but on average people are advised to have a 'balanced diet' which often has calories coming from the different macronutrients in a more or less equal ration i.e 40% protein, 30% carbs and 30% fats (this obviously depends on different individual metabolic types, but the ratio of proteins to carbs is not that high).

 

Another thing you can look at is typical meals in which you have way more rice in a plate than meat/sauce, or a pizza which has way more dough than topping, or a sandwich which has more bread than filling. With these quantity ratios, it is possible that the calories taken in from carbs and protein are not that far apart.

post #23 of 30
..
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonard Johnes View Post

 

Hey Liquidus,

 

Proteins contain 4 calories per gram, carbohydrates 4 calories per gram and fats 9 calories per gram. So assuming a piece of bread with a grams worth of carbohydrate and a piece of meat with a grams worth of protein, they will both have the same amount of calories i.e 4 calories. However, going on BBSLM's update, 30% of the calories from the meat will be used up in metabolic processes compared to under 10% from the piece of bread.

 

coolarrow, a stone is about 6.34kg, so basically he weighs about 76kg or about 168 pounds.


Dam metric system.

post #25 of 30

any thoughts on plant based proteins such as tofu/beancurds vs. animal based proteins?

post #26 of 30
Foods don't really burn fat.

The best you can do is eat foods that promote higher body temperature which conveniently means how well you metabolize.

Carby, salty, sugary, fatty foods are best for raising body temps... smile.gif
post #27 of 30
I lost 20 lbs in about 2 months by changing this to my diet:

1. No red meat during the week.
2. No soda
3. No snacking
4. Abstain from buying food I LOVE as the tendency to overeat is much higher.

Didn't even workout really.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraiche View Post

I lost 20 lbs in about 2 months by changing this to my diet:
1. No red meat during the week.
2. No soda
3. No snacking
4. Abstain from buying food I LOVE as the tendency to overeat is much higher.
Didn't even workout really.

the problem with red meat is what, exactly?
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post

the problem with red meat is what, exactly?

That most of it is derived from corn fed animals for one.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hugh51271 View Post

That most of it is derived from corn fed animals for one.

That's great, but also irrelevant, as the person I quoted made no mention of grass vs corn-fed beef.

You're also implying that replacing corn-fed beef with grass-fed will have some effect on fat loss.
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