or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Thrifters: How do you fix a price tag puncture in shirt fabric?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Thrifters: How do you fix a price tag puncture in shirt fabric? - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMartNJ View Post

 

lolwut.

http://artofmanliness.com/2009/10/01/alteration_guide/

 

About halfway down, under High Skilled alterations - Reweaving.

 

ccm 

post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hmm, found a thread elsewhere recommending an underside application of an iron on patch deal called Stitch Witchery:

 

http://www.thetfp.com/tfp/tilted-knowledge-how/48212-fix-small-hole-dress-shirt.html

 

But people said the iron temps required to set the adhesive borders burning the fabric.

 

This might be what I've been looking for:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Aleenes-Fabric-Fusion-Permanent-Adhesive/dp/B00178QSE6/ref=reg_hu-rd_add_1_dp

 

Normally used for people who can't sew, but should be a glue that will prevent a small hole from fraying, and it is designed to be more fabric-friendly than super glue.

 

Another option is this:

http://www.amazon.com/Beacon-Fabri-Tac-Permanent-Adhesive-4-Ounce/dp/B00178MNFO/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

 

But a reviewer warned that the Fabri-Tac is not dry cleanable, and I intend to dry clean these shirts.  The Aleene's Fabric Fusion states dry cleanable right on the label.

 

I will indeed steam the shirts first to even out the threads before applying any fabric glues, but as I said before, several threads have been broken.  I'm not sure you guys mean to suggest that a steamer will rejoin broken threads.  The grain on the BB fabric of these shirts was too small to be pierced harmlessly by these particular clunky tags.

 

Perhaps working to take care of your shirts and make them last longer isn't very baller - but I view it as training for when I'm eventually going to be caring for shirts much more valuable than Brooks Brothers.  Might as well learn the chops (and make the mistakes) on the disposable stuff.

 

ccm

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeecupman View Post

http://artofmanliness.com/2009/10/01/alteration_guide/

About halfway down, under High Skilled alterations - Reweaving.

ccm 

High Skill Alterations – Expensive ... not really worth it for $5 thrifted shirts, is it? Could be a $100 repair on something that's only $80 new.
post #19 of 28
Cotton dress shirts aren't generally dry cleaned. You may take them to a dry cleaners, but they will launder them.
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeecupman View Post

http://artofmanliness.com/2009/10/01/alteration_guide/

 

About halfway down, under High Skilled alterations - Reweaving.

 

ccm 

 

I was pointing out that you used woven and knit trying to refer to the same thing. They are fundamentally different ways of making fabric.

post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMartNJ View Post

 

I was pointing out that you used woven and knit trying to refer to the same thing. They are fundamentally different ways of making fabric.

 

Ah.  So that's what "lolwut" means.  Who knew?

 

ccm

post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post


High Skill Alterations – Expensive ... not really worth it for $5 thrifted shirts, is it? Could be a $100 repair on something that's only $80 new.

 

What is this word, "expensive"?  I thought you guys were all ballers.

 

Yeah, I was just saying it wasn't even an option.  I mentioned that it can't be done, in case someone were to suggest it.

 

ccm

post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KObalto View Post

Cotton dress shirts aren't generally dry cleaned. You may take them to a dry cleaners, but they will launder them.

 

Thanks, KObalto. 

 

ccm

post #24 of 28
All due respect ccm, time spent posting on this thread/mulling options over a tiny hole < cost of savings on thrifted shirt
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

All due respect ccm, time spent posting on this thread/mulling options over a tiny hole < cost of savings on thrifted shirt
I was in a courtroom last week when someone used that phrase while speaking to the judge. He interrupted her and said, "I've found over the years that when people say, "With all due respect...", they usually mean exactly the opposite!"

Since it wasn't a daytime reality TV courtroom, I resisted the urge to laugh out loud.
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

All due respect ccm, time spent posting on this thread/mulling options over a tiny hole < cost of savings on thrifted shirt

 

Hi Spoo.

 

I get that, but I'm not exactly in a typical situation - I'm working on ships for 4wks at a time.  Time on the internet is not something I am short of. 

 

Despite this, although the clothing I am working on was acquired cheaply, I am using the cheap clothing to develop skill sets.  So that someday, when I am buying $800+ shirts, I will know from experience how to take care of them/address uncommon problems.  

 

When later in life it is not a thrifted shirt, and something punctures it, I want to know what to do.  Looks from the replies like I'll be figuring it out on my own anyway - but I wanted to see if anyone had any experience with this first.  If not on SF, after all, where else?

 

I polish my Corcoran steel toe work shoes with Saphir.  Not because they need to shine like no other - but because I don't want to make my learner mistakes on Vass, etc - and out here I have the time to practice. 

 

ccm

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeecupman View Post

Hi Spoo.

I get that, but I'm not exactly in a typical situation - I'm working on ships for 4wks at a time.  Time on the internet is not something I am short of. 

Despite this, although the clothing I am working on was acquired cheaply, I am using the cheap clothing to develop skill sets.  So that someday, when I am buying $800+ shirts, I will know from experience how to take care of them/address uncommon problems.  

When later in life it is not a thrifted shirt, and something punctures it, I want to know what to do.  Looks from the replies like I'll be figuring it out on my own anyway - but I wanted to see if anyone had any experience with this first.  If not on SF, after all, where else?

I polish my Corcoran steel toe work shoes with Saphir.  Not because they need to shine like no other - but because I don't want to make my learner mistakes on Vass, etc - and out here I have the time to practice. 

ccm

Thanks for offering a perspective I hadn't considered. I hope you didn't take it the wrong way - but I understand your view now.
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digmenow View Post


I was in a courtroom last week when someone used that phrase while speaking to the judge. He interrupted her and said, "I've found over the years that when people say, "With all due respect...", they usually mean exactly the opposite!"
Since it wasn't a daytime reality TV courtroom, I resisted the urge to laugh out loud.

 

Anyone with less than 5000 posts who goes looking for respect on Styleforum deserves all he gets.

 

I'm hear to read and ask questions about clothes.

 

ccm

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Thrifters: How do you fix a price tag puncture in shirt fabric?