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1968 Brioni travel jacket, and travel jacket ideas. - Page 3

post #31 of 49
I like this design for a travel jacket.

post #32 of 49
Nice color and interesting pocket design, but for some reason I've never been able to like a shirt collar on a jacket.
post #33 of 49
I believe it is called a Ghillie collar.
post #34 of 49
Thread Starter 
Nice, but it looks like a sort of hunting garment.
post #35 of 49
True. But it has some design ideas that are interesting.
post #36 of 49
A bit too Austrian WWI for my liking...
post #37 of 49
Not enough pockets and too Bavarian, probably go well with lederhosen IMO
Edited by MikeDT - 10/3/12 at 10:20pm
post #38 of 49
How's the project coming along? Here are some images from Villarosa's Elegant Man that I thought might be helpful:





post #39 of 49
I don't understand the presumption that travel clothing should have an abundance of pockets. All you need is an inside zip pocket big enough for to hold a passport and boarding pass, plus another one for a smart phone. Maybe a small stash pocket, but that should really be part of the trouser. Add two ordinary slash pockets to keep your hands in and your good to go.

Moreover, styling should be based on outerwear. For instance, a short Mackintosh in Schoeller-c or Ventile, raglan sleeves, with pockets as styled above, a drawstring or some elastic at the waist for warmth management or just to give a more waisted look, and Barbour style snap on hood. Unlined or mesh lining, and perhaps discreet pit zips. Colors should be dark khaki or olive.

There is a jacket in the Stasi museum in Berlin, in the covert camera/surveillance exhibit, that would be a good styling base. I'll post pics later.
post #40 of 49

 

Not exactly like I described above, but to me seems a more sensible option than a shooting or safari jacket.

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

How's the project coming along? Here are some images from Villarosa's Elegant Man that I thought might be helpful:

Does away with the need for a carry-on bag, jacket is the carry-on bag.
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post


Is that Baden-Powell? I like his jacket.

Not so keen on pith helmets though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post


OK for shooting on the Norfolk Broads or you're the MD of an East Anglian poultry business.
Edited by MikeDT - 11/25/12 at 8:24am
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

I don't understand the presumption that travel clothing should have an abundance of pockets. All you need is an inside zip pocket big enough for to hold a passport and boarding pass, plus another one for a smart phone. Maybe a small stash pocket, but that should really be part of the trouser. Add two ordinary slash pockets to keep your hands in and your good to go.

When I'm flying, I always avoid putting anything in trouser pockets because of the metal detectors and frisking. Everything in the jacket, it goes through the X-ray along with carry-on, and you're done.

I'll often have an MP3/MP4 player as well, and maybe a book or two, in addition to the smart-phone, passport, boarding card, wallet and house-keys when travelling. They're in jacket pockets, as it saves rummaging through the overheads.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Moreover, styling should be based on outerwear. For instance, a short Mackintosh in Schoeller-c or Ventile, raglan sleeves, with pockets as styled above, a drawstring or some elastic at the waist for warmth management or just to give a more waisted look, and Barbour style snap on hood. Unlined or mesh lining, and perhaps discreet pit zips. Colors should be dark khaki or olive.

There is a jacket in the Stasi museum in Berlin, in the covert camera/surveillance exhibit, that would be a good styling base. I'll post pics later.

I'd like to see that, thanks.
Edited by MikeDT - 11/24/12 at 7:54pm
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

When I'm flying, I always avoid putting anything in trouser pockets because of the metal detectors and frisking. Everything in the jacket, it goes through the X-ray along with carry-on, and you're done.
I'll often have an MP3/MP4 player as well, and maybe a book or two, in addition to the smart-phone, passport, boarding card, wallet and house-keys when travelling. They're in jacket pockets, as it saves rummaging through the overheads.
I'd like to see that, thanks.

The coat is the one pictured in my previous post. It has a camera rigged n on of the chest zip pockets but that's obviously not necessary for our purposes.

Quite true about keeping trouser pockets empty at the airport. But whatever you'd keep in a secret pocket like extra cash and so on only needs to be there while out and about at your destination, and if the circumstance occurs where you need the stash pocket, you may lose your coat. Hopefully you're less likely to lose your trousers, which is why the stash pocket would be there.

I use my phone for music listening and book, journal reading, so that saves a lot of room. Keys I keep on a clip and that can be clipped to a pocket rim on the jacket. Wallet goes with the other documents.

What may be in order is a smaller, separate pocket next to the phone pocket for the headset, to keep it from tangling up when stowed and to manage cord slack when in use.
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Moreover, styling should be based on outerwear.

IIRC the OP wanted something he could wear with a tie, i.e., a sport coat adapted for travel, rather than an outerwear garment.
post #45 of 49
Quite, but I feel that using a tailored garment as a basis for something that is to be worn while traveling is a bad idea.

A travel coat needs to either resist wrinkling or be designed in such a way that wrinkles do not deter from its appearance. It needs pockets in places which are not optimal for a tailored coat due to bulk; it needs to be durable and should also provide protection against the elements if necessary. All of these features would detract from the appearance of a tailored coat when used for the occasions it would be called for once you are at your destination. A tailored suit or sport coat is easier to pack, if done carefully, than outerwear, and takes up less space in luggage. The travel coat can be used as outerwear or as a casual day coat, while making room in your bag for the dress jacket.
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