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ITT: Barware, Cocktail Accessories, Bitters, etc. - Page 15

post #211 of 370
The Parisian Shaker takes a bit of practice to use. It seals itself quite tightly once one is done shaking. It also needs to be held very tightly when dry shaking because of the lack of a vacuum.

As for Japanese cobbler shakers, I imagine the prevalence of the Cobbler is due to the preference for the "Hard Shake" over there. You can't do that in a Boston or even the Parisian really.
post #212 of 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

The Parisian Shaker takes a bit of practice to use. It seals itself quite tightly once one is done shaking. It also needs to be held very tightly when dry shaking because of the lack of a vacuum.

As for Japanese cobbler shakers, I imagine the prevalence of the Cobbler is due to the preference for the "Hard Shake" over there. You can't do that in a Boston or even the Parisian really.

 

The hard shake is indeed quite an exhibition. I don't know, however, that it makes the cocktail taste any better, though I did enjoy the experience when I was in Tokyo.

 

~ H

post #213 of 370
Thread Starter 
Orange/clove bitters this time around.

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post #214 of 370
Does anyone make their own brandied cherries?
post #215 of 370
Thread Starter 
Have some down right now. Not sure of the recipe as Mrs. Piob did it.
post #216 of 370
I suggest adding kirschwasser.
post #217 of 370
Thread Starter 
Actually, I know she did add some kirsch. Might have to open a jar this weekend.
post #218 of 370
I don't like the Luxardo maraska cherries nor the Fabbri amarena ones. I love the "Cerises à Paul". It's griottes (sour cherries, I suppose similar to maraska cherries) in sweetened eau de vie/kirschwasser. Nothing else. Fantastic. (210g cherries, 13.125 cl 40% kirsch and sugar)
post #219 of 370
Mine are "bourbon-ed," but it's pretty damn simple. Pit cherries, cover in a light, non offensive bourbon like makers mark, and let sit. I don't see much need for kirsch because you're basically making your own kirsch.
post #220 of 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

because you're basically making your own kirsch.
Not really. But I might give bourboned ones a try soon. How long do you let them sit?
post #221 of 370
They start to soften after 2-3 weeks. At their peak after 6 weeks.
post #222 of 370
I've bought some griottes at Carrefour a few months ago. I'll just dump them in some Four Roses and see what happens. (If there's any collateral damage, it'll be on you.)

post #223 of 370
post #224 of 370
How's that? Almost sounds a bit too fancy.
post #225 of 370
I've tried just soaking cherries in alcohol but the cherries taste too astringently alcoholic. They don't seem to release sugar like some other fruits do.

I make my own grenadine and orgeat as well. Occasionally I also make pineapple gomme syrup.
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