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Tan seersucker suit -- cloth and details choices

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
So I would like a tan cotton suit, and I do like seersucker. It wears its unavoidable wrinkles better than most other cotton, and in any case I'm intensely relaxed about wrinkles. But I'm not too keen on small-scale stripes in contrasting colours -- does any mill make tan-on-tan seersucker? The texture contrast is more than enough for me. I'm going to see my tailor sometime this week, but I suspect that his books won't have many seersucker choices (he's in Italy and quite old-fashioned in an Italian way). So if anyone knows a good source, I'm all ears. If someone has a good argument against self-striped seersucker I'm also open to be converted to another choice of material -- but please don't say linen, as I've got enough of the stuff. I've got a lightweight pair of wool gabardine trousers in progress and I like that material very much (I think it's Zegna), but I suspect it wouldn't make up very well as a coat, and in any case it would wear too hot.

Also, what about the details? I'm thinking of doing a two-button coat with two or three patch pockets. Should I ask for American-style machined edges? I suspect my tailor would be horrified, but still. Do machined edges look wrong with hand-sewn buttonholes? I'm not giving those up, so this would turn into a modus tollens argument against machined edges. For informal trousers lately I've taken a liking to flat-front with horizontal pockets (can't remember what they're called in English -- we call them 'alla carrettiera'). Again, any advice, pictorial or verbal, would be welcome.

Cheers.
post #2 of 10
It looks like there's one (or close to it) from Holland & Sherry. On the mytailor (Hemrajani) site, under suit fabrics, look at the H&S Contemporary Cotton fabric called "Beige." It looks like there's a slight color contrast.
post #3 of 10
If you are in NYC
you can buy basic tan and white seersucker from beckenstein.
then dye it tan.
you will get a great effect with out the harsh contrast you want to avoid.
Thom Brown did this with grey and white seersucker. and then dyed it grey.
it was great.

no reason to buy overpriced Holland and Sherry seersuckker
the machine 1/4" stitch with 3 patch pockets
ask for lap seams and a center vent.

i think you are talking about western pockets on the trousers
post #4 of 10
It could probably work but the look is not that great. The problem with seeksucker is a stiffness in the look rather than the relaxed suppleness which looks better in summer e.g. In a linen suit. The seersucker suit I bought a few months ago is yet to see service.

Try a solaro in lightweight wool which wears a bit cooler than cotton solaro. However the cotton solaro fades and wears in a very attractive way relative to wool which remains more unchanged over time. Hopsack and fresco weave summer clothes especially with a bit of mohair in them are also good choices.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

If you are in NYC
you can buy basic tan and white seersucker from beckenstein.
then dye it tan.
you will get a great effect with out the harsh contrast you want to avoid.

Hmm, seems a charmingly interesting process, but not so sure how to go about it. And no, I'm not in NYC. I'm in the UK, and often in Italy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

ask for lap seams and a center vent.
i think you are talking about western pockets on the trousers

Yes, that's the name.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tropicalist View Post

It could probably work but the look is not that great. The problem with seeksucker is a stiffness in the look rather than the relaxed suppleness which looks better in summer e.g. In a linen suit. The seersucker suit I bought a few months ago is yet to see service.
Try a solaro in lightweight wool which wears a bit cooler than cotton solaro. However the cotton solaro fades and wears in a very attractive way relative to wool which remains more unchanged over time. Hopsack and fresco weave summer clothes especially with a bit of mohair in them are also good choices.

Cotton Solaro! Good thought. Perhaps the kind with the plain twill rather than the herringbone: looks a lot less weird even with the red backing. Though a tone-on-tone version would be better. I'm sure my tailor has the ones from Drapers. Will check and report. Fresco or mohair are too formal for what I want.
post #6 of 10
Actually it is mostly in the mind. The cotton herringbone solaro looks no more strange than many other things we wear. I am a very conservative dresser and a tan cotton solaro with red backing fits reasonably well. In artificial light the red does not leap out. In sunlight I is attractive
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
But don't you agree that the plain twill Solaro is considerably less noticeable than the herringbone one? Despite the poor resolution one can tell the difference quite easily here (I think these are all wool though):

post #8 of 10
I'm not trying to convert you, but to me half the fun of seersucker is the actual stripes, and not just the texture difference. I've seen a tan and ivory version from Brooks that looked pretty good. the trick is finding a nice shade of tan, not too yellow. No idea where to buy yardage though. I like the idea of dyeing the fabric like Carl said. It could look pretty neat, or it might look too monochromatic, sorta like a doily or pillow. personally, I would go with gray/ivory stripe (think Oldog has this) and keep the pocket set-up standard flap. 1/4 inch stitching and maybe the center vent with j-hook if you wanto to go full American.
post #9 of 10
A solaro is easy to spot but it does not leap out or appear odd at all. It helps if you are wearing it during brig summer days or in the tropics. Don't go by the photos- feel the live cloth.

Actually I find it funny you think solaro stands out but st the same time started with seersucker which even in America stands in most states and outside America is strictly for fancy dress parties- dyed or no dyes
post #10 of 10
For what it's worth, I think your original idea is interesting and worth pursuing. I also like the H&S cloth (or at least the photo of it).
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