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10 suit wardrobe - Page 4

post #46 of 111
Flannel and fresco are also both more casual suitings than worsted ones. So the weight alone is not the determiner of what is appropriate to the situation, seasonality aside. To have a wardrobe of just flannels and frescos would be too limiting in my book. I think the basic wardrobe stuff Will has pointed out on his blog and more or less echoed by Chris in this thread results in a more well-rounded wardrobe.

Rob
post #47 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob View Post

Flannel and fresco are also both more casual suitings than worsted ones. So the weight alone is not the determiner of what is appropriate to the situation, seasonality aside. To have a wardrobe of just flannels and frescos would be too limiting in my book. I think the basic wardrobe stuff Will has pointed out on his blog and more or less echoed by Chris in this thread results in a more well-rounded wardrobe.
Rob

Who can confirm if this is true? I don't believe it. I think it matters how it is styled.
post #48 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Who can confirm if this is true? I don't believe it. I think it matters how it is styled.

Well, it is certainly true that they are less common today. In most office environments, when men wear suits, they wear smooth, three-season worsted cloth. So, if you want to appear as anonymous as possible, fresco and flannel are probably bad choices.

But you don't need a forum like this to achieve that goal. Just copy what you see.
post #49 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Who can confirm if this is true? I don't believe it. I think it matters how it is styled.


Well, I think historically - and others more knowledgeable are encouraged to correct me - flannels at least were used in more country than urban environments and not as formal. So, if one wants to dress in some sort of relation to how these clothes were worn, then I think casual/formal distinction works.

Rob
post #50 of 111
The grey flannel suit is a pretty classic suit for business.
post #51 of 111
While having all midweight worsteds may not be the most elegant solution, it's not "idiotic." Ninety percent of suited men likely spend 90 percent of their suited time in climate-controlled environments. And I question whether 11 ounces "looks like fall/winter suiting" -- 13 ounces, sure.

Neither fresco nor flannel are ideal for April and October in the Mid-Atlantic. And while I really like the surface interest and seasonality of both fabrics, there is something to be said for worsteds for more formal occasions.

I would get two midweight worsteds, four flannels and four fresco/other summer fabrics. And I'd admit that I've sacrified diversity in weaves, patterns and colors.
post #52 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Thin Man View Post

I would get two midweight worsteds, four flannels and four fresco/other summer fabrics. And I'd admit that I've sacrified diversity in weaves, patterns and colors.

I think that's fair. To be clear--I was being slightly facetious when I suggested only fresco and flannel. The fundamental point is to forget all notions of multi-season wear and skip straight to items that make sense in either cold or hot weather. After all, we are talking about a ten suit wardrobe. If you had to make do with two or three suits, my advice would be very different.
post #53 of 111
FWIW, here's my entire collection of suits (including ones I have ordered but haven't yet been delivered, and including RTW). I don't spend that much time in suits, as I wear odd jacket/trousers more often, but I'm wearing suits increasingly often. However I'm not required to for work, hence my suits being more tilted to the casual variety:

-navy worsted mid-weight
-light grey/brown sharkskin, i'd guess 10 oz
-brown tweed, not too heavy though
-mid grey flannel
-PoW fresco
-blue wool PoW , would guess 11-12 oz
-blue fresco
-tan linen blend
-midnight blue silk blend
-mid-grey small herringbone, i'd guess 11 oz
-black worsted (bought a long time ago, keep it in the back of my closet now for funerals)

Likely next one I'll add will be a darker nailhead or birdseye.
post #54 of 111
I don't think any normal business person could even tell the difference between a regular worsted and a fresco. I don't think anybody would notice.
post #55 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't think any normal business person could even tell the difference between a regular worsted and a fresco. I don't think anybody would notice.

In my experience it depends on the weight and the colour

I find that no one really notices when I wear my navy fresco, but when I wear my RAF fresco I get a lot of comments. I find that the lighter shade more obviously shows up the dry / open texture of the fresco
Edited by R.O. Thornhill - 8/14/12 at 6:05am
post #56 of 111
Very true. I have a Scabal plain weave that is like royal blue and it gets a lot of attention at work. Too much perhaps.
post #57 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Quote:
Everything you pick should fit your personality and fit in with your workplace. Having your wardrobe made gives you control over every detail.
My experience is clients tend to buy in one general weight for the bulk of the wardrobe. The weight they choose is different for everyone. Have clients who wear 18 ounce twills in Texas summers and others who think 9 ounce is winter weight. It depends on your tolerance and preference but it is good to know what weights you can be comfortable wearing. You will also want to form an opinion about texture, what you like and don't like.

If you get these ten suits in a weight you can wear anytime and with this diversity of color and pattern you will have something to wear anytime for any occasion. You won't avoid wearing something because it looks too seasonal.
If you read only the highlighted bold parts you see there is no specific recommendation. The last sentence here may hint at wearing year round cloth weights but if you interpret this in light of the previous statements you see it is client specific and not meant to be prescriptive. This is to bring to the attention of the OP to be aware that cloth weight is a choice in selecting his wardrobe that he can be intentional with where that option is more limited when buying RTW. From my experience when clients are new to selecting cloth for custom clothing they don't always have a keen sense of what cloth weights feel and wear like. After a few suits clients start asking to see samples in specific weights that they appreciate. When I ask for feedback about clothing we make for clients, the more common negative responses are "I don't wear that much because the cloth is too light weight and flimsy" or " I'm just too hot in that cloth and can't wear it that often". Everyone discovers a sweet spot in cloth weight and that's what they like to wear day in and day out. Like I said, with some it's a lighter weight, some mid weight and some prefer heavier weight and they tend to wear their preferred weight regardless of the season. If you have 10 suits for each season you have more leeway. Look at Manton's posts. He has practically an index of what cloth weights and weaves he can wear and at what temperatures. He has a keen sensitivity to cloth weights and seasonal temperatures. If anything, I have three seasons in my wardrobe and find that most versatile but 10 & 11 ounce is the sweet spot..
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


I think that's fair. To be clear--I was being slightly facetious when I suggested only fresco and flannel. The fundamental point is to forget all notions of multi-season wear and skip straight to items that make sense in either cold or hot weather. After all, we are talking about a ten suit wardrobe. If you had to make do with two or three suits, my advice would be very different.

The problem here is you have two 5 suit wardrobes and not one 10 suit wardrobe. Have you noticed that seasons aren't the same these days. Last year Chicago had one week of snow for all of the winter and unusually high, 60+ temps in January. Spent time in Dallas and the temperature was colder in Texas than Chicago. Had a week long trip to Dallas and the Temperature was sub 30 degrees the entire week. Went to New York in winter months last year and didn't need a topcoat. It's ok to have a seasonal wardrobe but if every piece is so specific it becomes difficult to dress within these variations and you look like the guy from out of town who brought 2 suits to dress for the weather.
post #58 of 111

After one year of record-high winter temperatues, I think it is a bit premature to assume it will never be cold again and that you can ditch the winter-specific items in your wardrobe.

 

Here is one opinion: http://www.truenorthoutdoor.com/2012-2013-winter-weather-predictions/

post #59 of 111
Winter temperatures are inconsistent is the point, not that the cold is disappearing
post #60 of 111
There could be 500 year cycles for weather for all we know.
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