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SquareFail; or, The Most Common Reason Why You Look Like Hell - Page 3

post #31 of 72

Is it ever appropriate to fold a cotton square in the same fashion as you would a silk one?

post #32 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am DIL View Post

Is it ever appropriate to fold a cotton square in the same fashion as you would a silk one?
If it's a print. The only good cotton prints I have ever seen are the drake Moghuls.
post #33 of 72
Fair enough. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post


Yah, that shirt should have been blue. But the (flannel) suit has purple stripes. I thought it was cute.


I dug it, Spoo.

post #34 of 72
yea i think blue shirt and i like it a lot more
post #35 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

OK, here is an example:
.

This poof was terribly puffed.
post #36 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

This poof was terribly puffed.

As a comparison, I think most of the squares in Spoo's pics above actually show pretty good poofing. Not the whale looking one, though.
post #37 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

See foo to learn how.

The foopoof is really quite artful, though unlike foo, I'm not offended by the gdl monkey fist either.
post #38 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by zbromer View Post

As a comparison, I think most of the squares in Spoo's pics above actually show pretty good poofing. Not the whale looking one, though.

I loved that whale frown.gif
post #39 of 72
Does the prohibition against squares with small dots apply if wearing and odd jacket or blazer without a tie?
post #40 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctp120 View Post

The foopoof is really quite artful, though unlike foo, I'm not offended by the gdl monkey fist either.

gdl's aren't as much poofs as they are poofs folded over. It's generally the only thing I ever dislike in his outfits. They lack the "I worked very hard to make this square look like I didn't work very hard putting it in my pocket" appearance that I think a square requires.
post #41 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

It can be totally unrelated as long as its colors are complementary.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

about complementary colors

[*] One can also utilize the color wheel - picking colors adjacent to each other, or on opposite sides. Two tones of blue are complementary to each other, just as is blue with rust orange.

Let me see if I can expand on the above “complementary” concept when it comes to squares . . .

The definition of complementary is "relating to or constituting one of a pair of contrasting colors that produce a neutral color (e.g. gray, black, or (with lighting) white) when combined in suitable proportions."

Colors that are opposite of the Red-Yellow-Blue (artistic) color circle are "complementary" when it comes to clothing.

Complementary can also mean "Serving to fill out, or complete."

The second definition is more important for squares. How can squares “complete” an ensemble?

As dww alluded to above, squares can “complete” an outfit in one of two ways: by contrast, or by harmony.

By choosing complementary colors opposite of the color wheel, one is going for contrast in colors. Extra care must be taken with these choices, as they can come across as jarring.

complementary.gif

Complementary (contrast) color scheme
Colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel are considered to be complementary colors (example: red and green).
The high contrast of complementary colors creates a vibrant look especially when used at full saturation. This color scheme must be managed well so it is not jarring.
Complementary color schemes are tricky to use in large doses, but work well when you want something to stand out. For example, complementary colors are really bad for text.


For a more harmonious pairing, choose colors close to each other on the color wheel. This would be an analogous color scheme . . .

analogous.gif

Analogous (harmony) color scheme
Analogous color schemes use colors that are next to each other on the color wheel. They usually match well and create serene and comfortable designs.
Analogous color schemes are often found in nature and are harmonious and pleasing to the eye.
Make sure you have enough contrast when choosing an analogous color scheme.
Choose one color to dominate, a second to support. The third color is used (along with black, white or gray) as an accent.

There are others if you want to really get theoretical about it.

I see an analogy to cooking.

The square through contrast (complement) can be another “flavor” to the ensemble, or through harmony (analgous) be just a “spice” to the ensemble.

Of the examples shown:

Square as another flavor (complementary, contrasting color) to the ensemble:



Square as a spice (analogous, harmonious color) to the ensemble:

b4b2946f.jpg

Which to choose?

Depends on how you feel, and how you want to come across.

There is no right or wrong here, just how it might come across.

- M
post #42 of 72
Thread Starter 
One caution though, red + green tends to look like "Christmas" so keep that in mind during non-Yule seasons.
post #43 of 72
^ Much of the sartorial world finds comfort and rejection of others through the identification of color with a certain culture (e.g., no brown in town, black and waiters, color scheme of Apparel Arts, etc.)

What I see is that the older and wiser lose much (yet are still aware) of those associations, and focus in on their own colorings as the focal point of dress (Flusser and Wolfe comes to mind).

- M
post #44 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post

What I see is that the older and wiser lose much (yet are still aware) of those associations, and focus in on their own colorings as the focal point of dress (Flusser and Wolfe comes to mind).
- M

This is pure fantasy.

Wolfe has explicitly explained that his white suit uniform has nothing to do with aesthetic preference and more to do with purposefully looking jarring and out of place. He likened it to appearing as an alien from another planet, which instigates others to explain things to him as if he has no clue about anything. There was no thought process about what would work well with his "coloring."

Flusser's color palette essentially is the Apparel Arts palette.
post #45 of 72
↑ Wrong.

I see the man ↓ . . .

2007tomwolfe247.jpg

- M

Also, even Wofle is not always perfect . . .
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