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MC General Chat - Page 47

post #691 of 2124
Thread Starter 
Link?
post #692 of 2124


Source
post #693 of 2124
Thread Starter 
I thought ikeamonkey was the name of some new member here ...
post #694 of 2124
The monkey is better dressed than most new members...
post #695 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

The monkey is better dressed than most new members...

WIN
post #696 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

The monkey is better dressed than most new members...

 

He apparently wears a nappy under the coat.

 

DB shearling & a nappy. I think we've found the perfect SF-approved attire to wear in a nursing home...

post #697 of 2124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

The monkey is better dressed than most new members...

I've been wanting to randomly drop this picture in WAYWT threads, even without having looked at anyone's fits, but I fear it would be more rude than funny

post #698 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

He apparently wears a nappy under the coat.

DB shearling & a nappy. I think we've found the perfect SF-approved attire to wear in a nursing home...

Whats a nappy?
post #699 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

Whats a nappy?

I interpreted it as the UK word/slang for diaper. YMMV.
post #700 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

I interpreted it as the UK word/slang for diaper. YMMV.

This is only definition I know of for nappy.
post #701 of 2124
Don Imus knows others...
post #702 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

Don Imus knows others...

I had to Google. I somehow missed all of that.
post #703 of 2124

^ indeed. Not a usage that's made its way to these shores.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post

Whats a nappy?

I interpreted it as the UK word/slang for diaper. YMMV.

 

Yeah, nappy = diaper.

 

Out of curiosity, I just googled the etymologies of the two words, given that they're both quite unusual words, something I've never really thought consciously about before.

 

Interestingly, diaper seems to probably be the older word, though not by much (both were in use as far back as the 16th century). I've noticed this with some other differences in words used in American English vs British English. The American word can actually be the older one, or at least equally old as the English word, but language altered less in the US (I suppose due to being relatively geographically separated from polite European society at first). Another example is Autumn vs Fall. Fall is the Old English/Old Germanic word used for the season; Autumn comes from Latin via Old French. Both used be be commonplace, but Fall fell out of use in England but was retained the US.

 

"Diapering" apparently refers to a diagonal/hatch pattern of a type of cloth. I suppose it eventually became a name for a particular item of clothing in the same way that "flannels" much more recently became a name for a particular kind of trouser i.e. calling the item solely by its material.

 

I expected nappy to derive from the nap of the cloth used, but it seems that in fact it's a more direct contraction of napkin... and napkin is a combination of nape+kin. "Nape" was a word for cloth and kin was a suffix used to make nouns diminutive. So, napkin = napekin = small cloth, and nappy is a further corruption of the original word. You can also see how nap could itself derive nape.

post #704 of 2124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Yeah, nappy = diaper.

Out of curiosity, I just googled the etymologies of the two words, given that they're both quite unusual words, something I've never really thought consciously about before.

Interestingly, diaper seems to probably be the older word, though not by much (both were in use as far back as the 16th century). I've noticed this with some other differences in words used in American English vs British English. The American word can actually be the older one, or at least equally old as the English word, but language altered less in the US (I suppose due to being relatively geographically separated from polite European society at first). Another example is Autumn vs Fall. Fall is the Old English/Old Germanic word used for the season; Autumn comes from Latin via Old French. Both used be be commonplace, but Fall fell out of use in England but was retained the US.

"Diapering" apparently refers to a diagonal/hatch pattern of a type of cloth. I suppose it eventually became a name for a particular item of clothing in the same way that "flannels" much more recently became a name for a particular kind of trouser i.e. calling the item solely by its material.

I expected nappy to derive from the nap of the cloth used, but it seems that in fact it's a more direct contraction of napkin... and napkin is a combination of nape+kin. "Nape" was a word for cloth and kin was a suffix used to make nouns diminutive. So, napkin = napekin = small cloth, and nappy is a further corruption of the original word. You can also see how nap could itself derive nape.

Thanks, Doc smile.gif
post #705 of 2124
interesting. this is not a topic i would have expected to see in MC. laugh.gif
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