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MC General Chat - Page 19

post #271 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post

If that's new, I would call it an improvement over the last two seasons: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
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RUN FOR YOUR LIVES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Nothing says summer like a cozy roll neck sweater, a good pair of boots and a nice cup of hot cocoa... biggrin.gif

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post #272 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by inlandisland View Post

Thanks for the great responses. I just feel like I've been seeing it more and more and more over the past few months - pocket squares, jackets, chinos at the mall, suits on blogs - I just saw some camo double monks on tumblr yesterday. Do you find that it becomes more popular based on any particular social factors? Do you think it's crossing over into tailored menswear is an attempt to appropriate 'classic' or 'traditional' values in a way somewhat similar to the appropriation of military constructs by streetwear?

It's pretty clear that the lounge suit, which was the uniform for essentially *all* working men for a short period of time, is becoming something else. For a lot of men, it already occupies the same space as a dinner jacket - special occasion clothing. For some, it's as antiquated as morning dress - I'm betting that only a very small minority of men can tell you what are the differences between informal and formal morning dress (the information is here - I've discussed this several times, and I think that Doc Holliday and Manton have as well, among others), because morning dress is, for all intents and purposes, irrelevant in 2012 as anything other than a costume.

Since so few men really have to wear a suit to work, or to be considered "properly dressed', designers can play with it a lot more. A lot of designers through the years, from Yamamoto to Armani to Gianfranco Ferre, have tried to redefine the suit. Streetwear usually has less lofty, less coherent, goals. The attitude is much more playful, generally, adding alien details, changing the proportions in often haphazard ways, mixing and matching with other styles and inspirations, etc... I think that all the camo linings, pairing "suit" jackets with camo pants, etc... are just a manifestation of a new way of looking at the suit.
post #273 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsugsu View Post

New rule: No camo in town?

did you get your felt boots? you stopped the convo and tbh I didn't follow then.
post #274 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivar View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I addition to clashing somewhat with the outfit's otherwise summery vibes, I think those jodphurs would benefit from being a shade or two darker. They look tan,
and I think chestnut would be a more harmonious match for the rest of the outfit.

no. they are excellent.
post #275 of 2128

I know this is off topic, but yesterday I went shopping with a female friend and I wanted to make a pocket square out of every dress she tried on. I think I need a psychiatrist...

post #276 of 2128

I never understood the style/trend of wearing pants too short and/or jacket too tight.  Where I come from short pants were called "high waters" and a major no-no. Not sure why some purposely want to wear them that way. I do understand some like a slight break and some pants look fine with no break, but for the pants to not even come to the top of the shoe looks ridiculous imo.

 

post #277 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyTop View Post

I never understood the style/trend of wearing pants too short and/or jacket too tight.  Where I come from short pants were called "high waters" and a major no-no. Not sure why some purposely want to wear them that way. I do understand some like a slight break and some pants look fine with no break, but for the pants to not even come to the top of the shoe looks ridiculous imo.


It's for aqua alta you see.
post #278 of 2128
I'll admit some of my pants can creep up a bit. It's something that I've been working with my tailor on. I default to a very slight (or often no) break. I don't have the tallest legs and the absence of a break makes my legs look a bit longer. It also aids a cleaner line on the pant. Unfortunately, when walking they often pull up a bit, making them look like flood pants. Again, something I'm trying to avoid with my pants moving forward.

The aesthetic that you are referring to is the shrunken or cropped fit. Shorter pants, jackets and sleeves and higher buttoning points with narrower lapels has a definite 1960s influence. At least from a mainstream point of view, this look's resurgence is likely traced directly to the popularity of Mad Men and Thom Browne in the mid 2000s. It's a look that somehow seems to work better for skinnier, lankier guys, which is strange because all of the characteristics of the look exaggerate their features and, therefore, should look terrible.
Edited by bourbonbasted - 8/27/12 at 12:11pm
post #279 of 2128
le perfect pents length. it is no easy feat. (feet?)



(shameless pun)
post #280 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I've always been particularly interested in the Streetwear/Designer overlap (different parts of SW&D fall closer to one side or the other). Like Fuuma already stated, militaria has always been a major influence on streetwear. Actually, a good part of all menswear has had military influences and inspirations, but it's probably always been more pronounced and obvious in the streetwear inspired brands. Japanese brands like Undercover, A Bathing Ape, and Goodenough (Hiroshi Fujiwara's first brand), UK brands like Griffin, 6876, and Maharishi, and US brands like Stussy, have always had camo, M65 and M66's, etc... in their collections, as have "performance" brands like Stone Island, which, as far back as I can remember, has been co-opted by street culture in the UK.
It is a trend right now. I guess that it fits the mood of the moment, which is one that I haven't seen for a while, which is classic menswear mixing with street culture. Hard to see how far things can go. I have theories on why we're seeing this, but they aren't really that well fleshed out, so you guys are all spared, for now.
I'm personally not a fan, though I grew up wearing a lot of drab.

I actually like some of the military influences, be they on very MC styles (I like a lot of Borrelli mil jacket one of our members like to sport) or more streetwear or designer looks. I'm not big on camo though, it sorta gives off the whiff of military without going for what is really interesting in the style: military cuts and detailing. I've also been wearing an old pair of green/yellow Nikes and some Adidas Stan Smiths and watching streetwear styles more carefully, I guess 90s nostalgia is upon me.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/us-dept-of-retro-warns-we-may-be-running-out-of-pa,873/
post #281 of 2128
post #282 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ich_Dien View Post


It's for aqua alta you see.
 
I see what you did there. 
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

I'll admit some of my pants can creep up a bit. It's something that I've been working with my tailor on. I default to a very slight (or often no) break. I don't have the tallest legs and the absence of a break makes my legs look a bit longer. It also aids a cleaner line on the pant. Unfortunately, when walking they often pull up a bit, making them look like flood pants. Again, something I'm trying to avoid with my pants moving forward.
The aesthetic that you are referring to is the shrunken or cropped fit. Shorter pants, jackets and sleeves and higher buttoning points with narrower lapels has a definite 1960s influence. At least from a mainstream point of view, this look's resurgence is likely traced directly to the popularity of Mad Men and Thom Browne in the mid 2000s. It's a look that somehow seems to work better for skinnier, lankier guys, which is strange because all of the characteristics of the look exaggerate their features and, therefore, should look terrible.

 

GQ from what I've seen has been fixated on the short pants too. Although they may have done so due to the influences such as Mad Men, etc. But for whatever reason, it's just a bad look imo.

post #283 of 2128
^^^jean jacket abomination is abominable.
post #284 of 2128
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

^^^jean jacket abomination is abominable.

Yes I'd love a nice summer stroll in Milan wearing many layers consisting of a wool suit and denim jacket as well as a shirt and tie.

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It occurred to me a few years ago that although mannequins and models look nice in their stylish and plentiful combinations, they really make no account for real weather or heat. If you wore all of Ralph Lauren's summer gear in the window of one of his shops on a true summers day you'd faint about five minutes after leaving the house.
post #285 of 2128
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