or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › MC General Chat
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

MC General Chat - Page 107

post #1591 of 2002
Nice video. PSA: Talarico is pronounced with emphasis on penultimate syllable rather on the second syllable as in the video.
post #1592 of 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

My buckle and belt came together, so maybe the buckle was meant to fit the belt in a way that wouldn't damage it. FWIW, it's from Tiffany.

Mine came with the belt as well, but the belt is RLPL and the buckle reads "Polo." I have to assume there was some Frankenstein-ing somewhere.
post #1593 of 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

^That jacket looks very good, Y. I had flapped patches on an old Brooks Bros tweed sportcoat I had for about 15 yrs. Didn't like the flaps. Imo, unless they button, they don't keep things more secure than open patches. Also, it was a little irritating trying to access the pockets. They required just a slight upward pull on the flap before reaching in, but since I was used to open patches on another jacket, I would always forget that little extra motion and it would irritate me.

To Doc, etc., you could find a frumpy cord coat rtw or at a thrift store, but the chances of finding one with the color, wale size, cut, and details one prefers is very low. I will probably get one from Luxire, uncanvased, so it can be machine washed and thus speed up the breaking in process (as well as cut down on the dry cleaning bill).

PB, have you ever tried Bick 4, the leather conditioner suggested by DWFII? Best stuff I've ever used. I've never had problems w/ Reno though. But I've only used it on shell, and really just on pair of Riderboot chukkas, since Ron included a jar of it w/ the boots. I only applied a bit once every few months, and that seemed to work well. Fwiw, I've used Venetian on shell the past few years, also sparingly, every few months, and w/ good results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I've never used Bick, but will have to check that out now that you mentioned it. Nick Horween at Horween once publicly mentioned that Venetian should be used on shell. Part of me doesn't understand why one conditioner would necessarily be better for shell than another (unless he's saying that Venetian is just the best conditioner, which is not the impression I got). Part of me wonders if it's just something he mentioned off handedly, and then people made it out to be something bigger than it was intended to be.

I think your'e right though - if you apply just a small amount of this stuff, it's fine. I slathered on Reno once and it ruined my shoes. Pea sized drops seem fine to me. Although ... outside it coming in a prettier jar and smelling better, I don't see why it's necessarily that much better than my unsexy Allen Edmonds Conditioner & Cleaner.

I haven't tried Bick4 yet, I mostly just use GlenKaren products and lexol now and again. Venetian is essentially just a polish when used sparingly. It does get a high shine, but I don't use it because of the petroleum distillates in it that are harmful. The thing is with listening to Nick Horween is that he most likely recommends it because he knows it makes his product look better, and that is pretty much his job, to sell his product. In the end, the stuff isn't good for leather.
post #1594 of 2002
Thread Starter 
There's an interesting bit in here, about two minutes and five seconds in, about why the toe rises on some shoes and not on others.

I'm too lazy to find them now, but this seems to have been discussed on a few threads about bespoke shoes - about whether it's a good or bad thing that the toe doesn't sit flush with the ground when the heel is flush. I think it was @bengal-stripe who once pointed out that this might not be a defect, but something built in, as a number of bespoke houses (such as GJ Cleverley) build their shoes like this. I never found the answer why, but maybe the above clip shows the reason
post #1595 of 2002
Toe spring. And yes, it is deliberate. Why was there question about it?
post #1596 of 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

Toe spring. And yes, it is deliberate. Why was there question about it?

 

Because people try to shoehorn (no pun intended) knowledge of street clothing into an understanding of traditional clothing, rather than learning by intuition and observation of real-world phenomena or asking their local shoemaker for real expertise. A sneaker is flat; ergo, a shoe should be flat. This, in essence, is the biggest problem with the "dressed by the Internet" paradigm: it's like a giant computer lab of young men trying to reverse-engineer classic clothing through scans of magazines and comments heard through the grapevine. Not a bad concept for a short story, that -- mankind is extinguished, and a race of under-30 alien lifeforms (they wear Rick Owens, natch) comes to Earth and tries to reconstitute classic men's clothing based on blog posts.

post #1597 of 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

Because people try to shoehorn (no pun intended) knowledge of street clothing into an understanding of traditional clothing, rather than learning by intuition and observation of real-world phenomena or asking their local shoemaker for real expertise. A sneaker is flat; ergo, a shoe should be flat. This, in essence, is the biggest problem with the "dressed by the Internet" paradigm: it's like a giant computer lab of young men trying to reverse-engineer classic clothing through scans of magazines and comments heard through the grapevine. Not a bad concept for a short story, that -- mankind is extinguished, and a race of under-30 alien lifeforms (they wear Rick Owens, natch) comes to Earth and tries to reconstitute classic men's clothing based on blog posts.

Who does this?
post #1598 of 2002
I have no quarrel with streetwear and know you are its patron saint. I am wearing my Damir Doma spacesuit robe and enjoying a plate of pasta as I write you this message.

What I mean is that there is at least a generation or two that's grown up solely on big S streetwear and is effectively playing the MC game blind. Take the way most contemporary mens' "trousers" for anyone below 45 are designed to emulate the fit jeans have, or had ten years ago. Now that skinny jeans are commonplace among the teenage set, when they get to pants-wearing age, I assume they will want dress pants that hug the knee and stack. Then, once jeggings become the norm for jeans among their children's children (rebelling against the "baggy" skinny-jeans-trousers of their fathers), people will be banging on the doors of Harrrison's and asking for worsteds with extra stretch. In this way, I am forced to conclude that the youths of 2060 will be bespeaking flannel pinstripe Speedos, having long cast off the jeggings shackles of their forebears.

Eventually, the Sun stops emitting heat and we board Amazon.com spaceships into a wormhole that deposits us in Huddersfield circa 1920. Everyone begins wearing Oxford bags and the cycle of history unspools itself again, on through J. Press, the Armani years, and then the mutually-assured destruction of flannel jeggings.
post #1599 of 2002
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post

Toe spring. And yes, it is deliberate. Why was there question about it?

I wasn't aware that if it was flat, you'd have to raise your weight more as you go through your stride. Perhaps that's more common knowledge here? In any case, there was an old thread about this, where bengal_stripe commented on Cleverley's construction, and people wondered why some makers do this, and some don't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

I have no quarrel with streetwear and know you are its patron saint. I am wearing my Damir Doma spacesuit robe and enjoying a plate of pasta as I write you this message.

What I mean is that there is at least a generation or two that's grown up solely on big S streetwear and is effectively playing the MC game blind. Take the way most contemporary mens' "trousers" for anyone below 45 are designed to emulate the fit jeans have, or had ten years ago. Now that skinny jeans are commonplace among the teenage set, when they get to pants-wearing age, I assume they will want dress pants that hug the knee and stack. Then, once jeggings become the norm for jeans among their children's children (rebelling against the "baggy" skinny-jeans-trousers of their fathers), people will be banging on the doors of Harrrison's and asking for worsteds with extra stretch. In this way, I am forced to conclude that the youths of 2060 will be bespeaking flannel pinstripe Speedos, having long cast off the jeggings shackles of their forebears.

Eventually, the Sun stops emitting heat and we board Amazon.com spaceships into a wormhole that deposits us in Huddersfield circa 1920. Everyone begins wearing Oxford bags and the cycle of history unspools itself again, on through J. Press, the Armani years, and then the mutually-assured destruction of flannel jeggings.

I know you were joking, but I think the real advantage of wearing a coat and tie your whole life is that you can wear it a bit more naturally. That is, without having to stringently follow rules or make the mistake of pairing things oddly. The shape of tailored trousers has fluctuated just as much as jeans have over the last 100 years or so (OK, maybe not just as much, but a lot).
Edited by dieworkwear - 3/22/14 at 7:55am
post #1600 of 2002
DWFII has written a good bit on toe spring here too.
post #1601 of 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I know you were joking, but I think the real advantage of wearing a coat and tie your whole life is that you can wear it a bit more naturally. That is, without having to stringently follow rules or make the mistake of pairing things oddly. The shape of tailored trousers has fluctuated just as much as jeans have over the last 100 years or so (OK, maybe not just as much, but a lot).

 

A fair point. Maybe we can say that today's jeggings represent a return to Renaissance-era tights.

post #1602 of 2002
What are we arguing here? I'd like to be a part of it.
post #1603 of 2002

Not quite sure but I did just have a couple espressos so I'll gladly fight you on any subject. Put up your dukes :slapfight:

post #1604 of 2002
That feeling when you go to a meeting and everyone there is horrifically dressed, wearing skintight suits and happy socks with hems to the ankle, personalities made of cardboard, but they all are male model level handsome. What a ripoff. They could wear denim overalls and still they would have carte blanche. I guess the gentiluomo archetype was created for times like these, so the non-Adonisian among us can take comfort in having mastered the gentle virtues.

I'm just going to go eat a pint of ice cream and watch Fred Astaire movies.
post #1605 of 2002
I'd be fine working around people that look like that. You should see the slobs I work with...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › MC General Chat