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How Much Attention Do You Pay to "Your" Coloring? - Page 2

Poll Results: How Much Attention Do You Pay to "Your" Coloring?

 
  • 2% (1)
    Tons; I am a slavish follower of Carol Jackson
  • 31% (14)
    A lot; I know what works for me and what to avoid
  • 27% (12)
    A little; I never thought about it until seeing the doctored photos in Dressing the Man but now I try to follow those
  • 38% (17)
    None; I put together ensembles based on how the clothes go together but with no consideration of my own coloring
44 Total Votes  
post #16 of 54
I think there is some validity to color theory. I know I look better in some colors than in others. I just forget which ones. And I don't pay that much attention to it anyway. Odd as it may seem, while I enjoy dressing and thinking about clothes, I don't care that much how I actually look. It doesn't really matter except when I have something specific to do and then I want to make sure I look right for the situation, convey the right image, and am not wearing anything that would detract or distract from my overall appearance. But generally, I care more about the process than the outcome, and color theory isn't a part of the process that I care about.
post #17 of 54
Being of ruddy WASP/Scotch-Irish descent, I tend to avoid the chartreuse/mustard family. Which is no great loss since I don't really like those colors anyway. But the whole "seasons" thing comes off like a contrivance meant to sell books.
post #18 of 54

I'm A Dark brown complexion and for me i try to go for a more lighter wardrobe. So colors such as Tan/Khaki, Navy blue, greys, and i might even have a mixture of  dark and light fades example, burgundy and grey. i really think this is an eye catcher. 
 

post #19 of 54

I've found that it makes a fairly big difference when considering colours, but only those worn above the waist.  I am a high contrast winter by definition (dark hair and fairly pale skin) and subsequently won't wear the following as they seem to wash me out:

 

Blue shirt with a yellow or pink tie (light-coloured ties are all ruled out for me to be honest)

Rust ties

Soft, earthy greens or browns

Light coloured SCs when worn with an open-necked shirt

 

I have seen bloggers extend the colour theory to recommending certain colours of footwear for every colouring but this is totally absurd IMO as the shoes are so far away from the wearer's face that it has no impact.

post #20 of 54
I have fair skin with pinkish overtones.

I have been a member of the Color Association and the Color Marketing Group for over 20 years. In my career I developed over 500 SKU's annually using combinations of colors and patterns on consumer products. So color selection and color combination decisions have been important decisions on a daily basis.

Here are the conclusions that I've come to over the years of working with color as it applies to selecting my wardrobe.

It isn't just "a color" that works for a person. It is finding combinations of the right shades of colors that work for you.

There are certain colors that really work for me. I can't wear all the colors that others wear. If I stick with certain colors or intensities of colors I look my best.

I think labeling people Summer, Winter, Spring can be confusing and misleading. I believe it is better to simply come up with your own list of colors that you can mix and match because they make you look your best year round.

In the winter/fall, when I'm most pale, any grey lighter than charcoal grey jackets/suits washes me out. I just can't wear them without looking pasty or worse, ill. That wouldn't happen to someone with deeper skin toner. Of course, I can wear lighter grey pants year round because they are further away from my face and what is left of my hair.

In the fall/winter deep mossy greens work very well for me and my pinkish skinned brethren. (note the classic popularity of that color in the UK where pinkish fair skin is prevalent)

Pale pink and pale blue shirts look awful on me and wash me out. I select a shade of blue, especially end-on-end with that is not a medium blue and not pale, it is right in the middle. The right shade of blue makes a huge difference. The same goes for pink. Too pale and I'm washed out. But, with the right intensity, I get compliments like, "hey you look great", "You look like you have been working out".

I need slightly brighter and intense colors for contrast against my skin. I suppose it is the same as wearing a sport jacket that is similar in tone and value to the pants. Without more contrast it just doesn't look it's best.
post #21 of 54
PSG, that reminds me... When I was very young, people would tell me I looked good in pink, since my skin is fairly dark. But then I spent a year in the Philippines and people said I didn't look very good in pink, since my skin is too light. I'm not sure what the lesson is in this. Maybe again that some things about it are objective and some are relative.

I think you, bmulford, or Niidawg, once said that it makes sense to coordinate colors of things and your face and hair have their own color. This isn't to say one should be as rigid as Dressing the Man or other books may imply. (I don't own that Flusser book and didn't see that section when flipping through it once. Have never seen Colors for Men.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

So I kinda believe in it, but I put only so much stock in it.
I'm w/ you, Nii, and Dah, and others in this. It's kind of like astrology to me: Sometimes, when I hear a claim or two, it kinda makes sense, but I've never studied it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

I think there is some validity to color theory. I know I look better in some colors than in others. I just forget which ones. And I don't pay that much attention to it anyway. Odd as it may seem, while I enjoy dressing and thinking about clothes, I don't care that much how I actually look. It doesn't really matter except when I have something specific to do and then I want to make sure I look right for the situation, convey the right image, and am not wearing anything that would detract or distract from my overall appearance. But generally, I care more about the process than the outcome, and color theory isn't a part of the process that I care about.
Wow, I think what you say about process > outcome except for in certain situations describes me well too.
post #22 of 54
I laughed reading the Carol Jackson choice in the poll. I met her twice at publishing events when she was launching her career. Each time I asked her, "What color am I". Each time she gave me a different answer. But in fairness, the second time was after spending a few days at the beach and I was more tanned. That may have had something to do with it. But that also shows that color selection can be influenced by some seasonal variations.

I could probably pull off a medium grey suit this time of year because I tend to have a bit more of a tan from being outside. I could never wear one in Oct-April without looking washed out.
post #23 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

PSG, that reminds me... When I was very young, people would tell me I looked good in pink, since my skin is fairly dark. But then I spent a year in the Philippines and people said I didn't look very good in pink, since my skin is too light. I'm not sure what the lesson is in this. Maybe again that some things about it are objective and some are relative..

My guess is that it isn't "pink" in general that works or doesn't work, it is selecting the right shade of pink that best compliments your skin tone.

What people call pink ranges anywhere from a pale, almost white, to dusty rose, to watermelon to pinkish lavender. You have to find the best one for you.

There is no question that certain colors and intensity of color choices have an ethic and cultural slant in their homelands. That may have effected the feedback you received in the Philippines. Look how many in Latin America prefer more intensity in their color pallet. But they also have deeper skin tones, dark hair and a tradition of more intense colors.
post #24 of 54
I've enjoyed reading this discussion. Personally the only area where I pay any conscious attention is that I've got more green ties than I would if my eyes weren't also green. Maybe that's considered garanimalesque matching by some. But I like the effect. I read the Flusser stuff and also noticed the doctored photos and thought, if you've got to doctor the photos to make your point...maybe your point isn't that much of a point.

I've also got, or at least I think I've got, a complexion that doesn't really preclude anything. My skin is kind of medium tone with some pink, my hair a medium to dark brown. There are some colors that I rarely wear, like red or its darker variants. I have one burgundy scarf that I like. I think that's it. It doesn't derive from anything I read or thought about analytically relating to my coloring, but there could be some relation that is more intuitive. Or maybe I just don't like red.
post #25 of 54
I always thought one of the great things about being a man is that we don't have to worry about things like complexion and clothing. Then my ginger friend told me that is just because I am olive skinned and look good in anything. Touche.
post #26 of 54
I don't know how to answer the question.

I think I know that certain colors look good on me and that others are to be avoided.

But I'm not sure I could tangibly give you a theory as to why, and it's also simply possible that I simply don't like those colors. It's also possible I'm driven a bit by racialist preferences as to what one "ought" to wear. Example: I think most pastel colors look awful on me because I am somewhat dark-complected, but it might just be because I think preppy white boys wear pastels.
post #27 of 54
I also recall being at a men's store somewhere or another and this black man asked me my advice on a shirt for this mid gray suit he was purchasing. I immediately reached for the light blue shirt. He said, "Yeah, that looks good... but I'm black." We both started laughing nervously.
post #28 of 54
I did not vote. The option: A lot; I know what works for me and what to avoid would have worked for me if it had read Very little; as I already know what works for me and know what to use and what to avoid. Textures, patterns and most of all experience are of equal importance to colour. Colours that may not work with ones skin tones in a shirt, may work in a textured jacket, pants or perhaps in a nice tie.
post #29 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

The thing is, I read Color for Men and I didn't understand it. Or, at least, I never saw what she claims to see. The Flusser photos were similarly unpersuasive and then once you notice they are doctored, even the possibility of belief drains away.
However, even if I did believe it, I am not sure how I would respond. I like all kinds of colors and combinations and I can't see giving them up to remain in the same narrow range just because they are supposedly "my" colors.

Me either -- never was able to figure out what "season" I was supposed to be. When I was younger I worried about anything that might make my already pasty-white/blotchy red Irishness more florid. Now that I am older, maybe my skin is just greying or something, because I don't notice it anymore.

I have blue eyes and white (used to be grey, but who am I kidding anymore) hair, if that helps explain my colouring any better.

So I voted some awareness and concern because I used to think about it, but now I have pretty much given it up.
post #30 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg1 View Post


Me either -- never was able to figure out what "season" I was supposed to be. When I was younger I worried about anything that might make my already pasty-white/blotchy red Irishness more florid. Now that I am older, maybe my skin is just greying or something, because I don't notice it anymore.
I have blue eyes and white (used to be grey, but who am I kidding anymore) hair, if that helps explain my colouring any better.
So I voted some awareness and concern because I used to think about it, but now I have pretty much given it up.

The problem, imo,  with Jackson book is if you are a "hybrid" things get super complicated. 

 

Both summer and winters share many characteristics, but what if you have all the "summer features" but a dark beard on the light skin, while having less contrasting hair on your had, etc.

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