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post #31 of 62

So I'm in my third year of university and I am simply not feeling it anymore. I started off as a government major for my first year and semester, at which point I realised this was not for me, so for the last year and semester I have since been an art history/philosophy double major. Last semester was great, a lot of fun learning, supportive tutors and lecturers and fantastic grades, but this semester has been the complete opposite. My courses either have uninspiring lecturers or uninspiring content. I'm not sure if this is just a short phase or an actual realisation but I feel like I'm not getting anywhere with what's being offered at my current university. The humanities department is the best in the country but the art history department seems to be completely isolated from the kind of work i want to get into: art writing outside of academics. 

 

So I want to transfer to a different university, a smaller art school with a better program and better integrated in the industry I'd like to get work in. The question now is should I transfer, and if so when?

 

If I don't transfer, then I basically have another year and semester to complete my BA. At this stage I can either do two things, do my honours then proceed into post-grad and compromise and go into academics, or after that do another Bachelor's in art theory (at the smaller art school) and do my honours there instead (four years in total). Although the latter option requires a lot more years I come out with a more rounded education and it leaves my options open.

 

If i do transfer for the coming semester then it will basically be another 2-3 years at a new school, then honours, then perhaps post-grad.

 

You might say the transfer option and the second bachelor's option is the same but they aren't, I wouldn't be able to study any philosophy (outside its relevance to art) if I transfer.

 

Money is no issue because I don't have to pay for any upfront fees until I start working and earning 50K+ p.a. and even then I'd still have a liveable income. The only issue for me is the amount of years lost.

 

I know this must be agonising to read for the older SFers, so I just want to clarify that my intentions are not just to waste as many years at school to avoid being an adult, I am genuinely interested in learning the most I can while studying and finding some level of success as a writer. 

 

Also I apologize for the massive post.

post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by YOLO EMSHI View Post

So I'm in my third year of university and I am simply not feeling it anymore. I started off as a government major for my first year and semester, at which point I realised this was not for me, so for the last year and semester I have since been an art history/philosophy double major. Last semester was great, a lot of fun learning, supportive tutors and lecturers and fantastic grades, but this semester has been the complete opposite. My courses either have uninspiring lecturers or uninspiring content. I'm not sure if this is just a short phase or an actual realisation but I feel like I'm not getting anywhere with what's being offered at my current university. The humanities department is the best in the country but the art history department seems to be completely isolated from the kind of work i want to get into: art writing outside of academics. 

So I want to transfer to a different university, a smaller art school with a better program and better integrated in the industry I'd like to get work in. The question now is should I transfer, and if so when?

If I don't transfer, then I basically have another year and semester to complete my BA. At this stage I can either do two things, do my honours then proceed into post-grad and compromise and go into academics, or after that do another Bachelor's in art theory (at the smaller art school) and do my honours there instead (four years in total). Although the latter option requires a lot more years I come out with a more rounded education and it leaves my options open.

If i do transfer for the coming semester then it will basically be another 2-3 years at a new school, then honours, then perhaps post-grad.

You might say the transfer option and the second bachelor's option is the same but they aren't, I wouldn't be able to study any philosophy (outside its relevance to art) if I transfer.

Money is no issue because I don't have to pay for any upfront fees until I start working and earning 50K+ p.a. and even then I'd still have a liveable income. The only issue for me is the amount of years lost.

I know this must be agonising to read for the older SFers, so I just want to clarify that my intentions are not just to waste as many years at school to avoid being an adult, I am genuinely interested in learning the most I can while studying and finding some level of success as a writer. 

Also I apologize for the massive post.

I would not transfer. You don't go to college to maximize your learning, there is a great deal of truth behind the cliche that a library card will teach you more than most professors.

If your current school has "the best humanities department in the country", you should stay there and get that degree. Do your honors/second bachelor's at the second school that you feel is a better fit (but realize that the instruction will likely be just as shitty as your current school). Will that second bachelor's really take four years? Will none of the credits transfer? I find that really hard to believe.

Your concern about "years lost" will seem silly when you're in your thirties.
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

Does anyone know any good resources for understanding, diagnosing, and dealing with family members who seem to be showing signs of a personality disorder?

Walking on eggshells is a good book. It's less about helping your family member than it is helping you deal with them.
post #34 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by YOLO EMSHI View Post

(...)I know this must be agonising to read for the older SFers, so I just want to clarify that my intentions are not just to waste as many years at school to avoid being an adult, I am genuinely interested in learning the most I can while studying and finding some level of success as a writer. 

Also I apologize for the massive post.

MHO - don't transfer, get your degree and start living outside of academia. Return only if you see a need to and can justify in financially.
post #35 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteslashasian View Post

I think to myself "I may regret sitting here all evening, watching TV, browsing SF, etc, but I have NEVER ONCE regretted going to the gym or getting exercise in."

That usually gets my ass off the couch/chair and to the gym.

That is of course barring any kind of injury *knock on wood.

This is good stuff
post #36 of 62
Alright, time for another quarter life crisis post.

I currently work for a lower level flying company that does specific, technical work. (not passengers or cargo) I make more money than my other friends and peers, but I'm in a job with fewer long term opportunities and it provides literally no challenge or very relevant experience to higher up jobs. This job is insanely cushy (i work 2 weeks out of the month and of those two weeks it's generally 6-8 days of actual flying) and I went into it knowing that it would be short term, no more than two year or so, probably less. Now that I've seen what the aviation world has to offer I've decided that flying is a little different than I thought it would be. I knew the schedules would be hard, very long days, constantly changing, etc, but I just didn't estimate the tedium of actually flying day in and day out. I've learned how to deal with all of this at my current job and feel that I could put up with this for the rest of my career though. I would just be resigning myself to knowing that every day I would work I would be bored and not challenged about 95% of the time. (Not looking for a "i sit behind a desk for 10hrs a day and I'm stuck in an office. Suck it up" response) I realize most people are bored with and dislike their jobs. I've decided that if I were to stay with aviation it would be strictly for the lifestyle I could have with the job. Free travel, the ability to work less if I needed to, and pretty good pay later on in the career. I'm still young and single so I would use my free time to travel places and experience life for the time being. The other draw back is once I do settle down ,have kids, etc.. I will probably be gone 12-15 days a month, but that just comes with the territory.

On the flip side. I've always been a person who likes hardship and tests. Always enjoyed physical exertion in high school sports, being pushed to physical limits, and being part of something special and demanding. (Mainly because I excel in these areas) I've thought about taking on a job that would constantly be that in some form or fashion. Have a long military history in my family from just about every branch. I'm considering joining the Marines as an officer. I wouldn't care whether I got a flight slot or not, although being a marine pilot would almost guarantee me a solid paying airline gig when i got out. I would like to have some type of job that would give me skills to transfer to a civilian job when i retired. (I'd be around 45 once i finished up the full 20yrs) I don't have some calling to serve my country per se and am not the most nationalistic person there is. This would be more of a personal thing. It seems I would get the travel and life experiences (obviously different experiences than I would with an airline job and travel) I long for. Have the prestige of being a marine on my resume yada yada. Every 4-6 months I get this urge that I want to join the military. This has been happening since my freshman year in college.

I feel like I've explored all options and really given this a lot of thought. The few friends and coworkers I've spoken with this about have pushed my towards the Marines with them telling me that I'm pretty much made for it and could definitely see me doing it.

Also, if for some reason I totally dislike the military or it just doesn't work out I still have enough experience to keep my flying career moving along. I could also return to it after my military career ended.

Any input is helpful and I could speak more in depth over a PM if someone needed specifics.
post #37 of 62
Thread Starter 
Nobody can really answer this question for you, but I'd have the following three points of advice for you:

1 - Remember that any military job can ultimately ask you to make the ultimate sacrifice. Do not underestimate this reality if you are not prepared at some level to confront it. I understand that maybe it's different for pilots or for officers than for enlisted, but it's not just privates dying over there.

2 - It sounds to me as though you have plenty of time outside of work in your current vocation to pursue the self-actualizing activities that will allow you to grow as a person. Piob will undoubtedly "like" this post when he reads this next bit: It is a fallacy that has been pushed on your generation that you should love your job and work in a field and/or capacity that rewards you in ways other than finances. While it's true that some people do love their jobs, it's not true that everyone, or even a majority of them, do. Do not underestimate the freedom that your current job offers, financially and most of all time-wise, to follow your bliss.

3 - The grass is always greener on the other side. There's going to be plenty of drudgery, sometimes mind-numbing drudgery, in a military officer's job. And if you're flying in the military, is there a reason it would be different than the current flying drudgery you have today?

Good luck.
post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post

2 - It sounds to me as though you have plenty of time outside of work in your current vocation to pursue the self-actualizing activities that will allow you to grow as a person. Piob will undoubtedly "like" this post when he reads this next bit: It is a fallacy that has been pushed on your generation that you should love your job and work in a field and/or capacity that rewards you in ways other than finances. While it's true that some people do love their jobs, it's not true that everyone, or even a majority of them, do. Do not underestimate the freedom that your current job offers, financially and most of all time-wise, to follow your bliss.

Thanks for the response. I've definitely come to terms with a job is nothing more than a device to make money. In that regard, staying in aviation and starting a job that could lead to 150-250k a year would make the most sense financially. I am very fortunate to have as much free time as I do now and that's something that would probably be at a premium in the military.
post #39 of 62

How do I keep myself from drinking?

I need to stop. What do I try?

post #40 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenjiKen View Post

How do I keep myself from drinking?
I need to stop. What do I try?

Did your mother raise a quitter? I hope not.
post #41 of 62
Im taking an English class with a professor that really enjoys the author and has written several books about him. I'm considering writing a final essay worth 50% essentially hating on the author. Bad idea even if it is well written?
post #42 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenjiKen View Post

How do I keep myself from drinking?
I need to stop. What do I try?

Hang out socially with friends who don't drink while maintaining your old friendships by doing non-drinking things with them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Im taking an English class with a professor that really enjoys the author and has written several books about him. I'm considering writing a final essay worth 50% essentially hating on the author. Bad idea even if it is well written?

Depends. Who's the author?
post #43 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post

Im taking an English class with a professor that really enjoys the author and has written several books about him. I'm considering writing a final essay worth 50% essentially hating on the author. Bad idea even if it is well written?

If you haven't already floated a trial balloon to see how the professor handles dissent, then I would avoid.
post #44 of 62
Nabokov.

He doesn't get angry over dissent he just turns shortcomings into intent.

I am thinking of writing a tamer one about his time in ithaca, but it doesnt sound as fun to me
post #45 of 62
Thread Starter 
Lolita is one of my favorite books of all time.

I later picked up King, Queen, Knave and it was unreadable, but it is one of those early Russian works that was translated, so maybe that was the problem.
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