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whnay.'s good taste thread - Page 647

post #9691 of 12823
I can see where you're coming from, Victor, and the conclusion you come to, based purely on pictures on the interwebz. Some insight regarding the fabric and construction might help.

The "flatness" of the lapels is due partly from the ridiculously lightweight linen/silk fabric. Also, NSM's construction and canvassing are softer than most. These factors render the lapels less three-dimensional than other suitmakers. Which may or may not be to your liking.

When worn open (as I usually do), the jacket has a pretty sweet roll to it. Not dramatic, just nice and smooth.
post #9692 of 12823

SB, slouching doesn't seem to change how my lapels roll, but that could be my jacket, which is quite drapey. Also, C, I'm not disputing the lapel's width nor their straightness, just how they render the width, which seems too abruptly to me by what I can see on the photograph. Perhaps I'm seeing things, guys... I'm not going foo over this. smile.gif

 

I'm familiar with them, UC, but thanks for the "insight". I recognized their silhouette based purely on pictures on the interwebz, but I did not want to attract more polemic to they without being sure.

Their approach is just not for me then, the lack of roll on a wide lapel is just a downer for me. Different strokes for different folks, it is.

 

Edit: Bellow, the lapels that Vox was speaking about. Similar, IMO.

 


Edited by Victor Elfo - 8/16/13 at 6:39pm
post #9693 of 12823

I quite like how the lapels roll on this particular jacket of mine, which has a half canvas construction. I'd be inclined to think the break point is a bit too high above the button, but somehow that creates a very nice curve. Looks better from the other side, but I don't have any pics.

 

 

 

post #9694 of 12823
VE, imo you are the king of nitpicking, and i rarely agree with you. i think you often go off on nuances that either have no point, or are non existent. no haet.
post #9695 of 12823

You see my comments as nitpicking, and you're entitled to it, but I simply do care about those details, I'm that interested in clothing. On the end it's a subjective discussion, some are happy with "good enough" and others are happy with "looking for perfection" (emphasis on looking). In my opinion, the first is mediocrity, the last is excellence. No hate, as well.

post #9696 of 12823
I think many of us strive for perfection, and do not try to settle for good enough or mediocre.

However, I think that the things you tend to nitpick on, are nonesensical and usually wrong.

Ymmv tho, everyone has the right to focus in what stands out to them.
post #9697 of 12823

I disagree, as discussing lapel shape is far for nonsensical considering a coat's silhouette and my position is adopted by many tailors and bespeakers.

I can't communicate with people like you and vice-versa. We've two very different approaches when it comes to critiquing and, probably, life itself. I've realized this and stayed away from you. Let's end this here, nothing good will come out from this. Thank you.


Edited by Victor Elfo - 8/17/13 at 9:13pm
post #9698 of 12823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Elfo View Post

You see my comments as nitpicking, and you're entitled to it, but I simply do care about those details, I'm that interested in clothing. On the end it's a subjective discussion, some are happy with "good enough" and others are happy with "looking for perfection" (emphasis on looking). In my opinion, the first is mediocrity, the last is excellence. No hate, as well.

I predict you will have a great life.
post #9699 of 12823

Looking for perfection in tailoring will make you way too self-conscious about it, which (I suspect) in turn will never lead to style/elegance.

post #9700 of 12823
Moved to WAYWRT
Edited by adrianaty - 8/18/13 at 5:30am
post #9701 of 12823

Post that here please.

post #9702 of 12823

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stugotes View Post

Looking for perfection in tailoring will make you way too self-conscious about it, which (I suspect) in turn will never lead to style/elegance.

 

Let's suppose that your premise is right (perfectionism leading to self-consciousness). We're humans, so no matter how pedantry we get on our choices, there will always be a bit of chaos. However, you stepped ahead of yourself and didn't asked the first question: perfection for whom? It's a personal concept of perfection, therefore it's my style. The elegance, however, is for you to judge.

post #9703 of 12823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Elfo View Post

I'm sorry if the coat is not bespoke, but I'm going to nitpick on your lapels, UC. In my opinion, those lapels lack taste and shape, they're just out of proportion and flat. Unfortunately, I don't have enough spare time to explain the issue with my own words, but both Vox and Alden have already written about this subject.

Here is Vox's take on the subject:


Here is Alden's with an addendum where he seems to be very on par with Vox's analysis about the "high" belly:

I would agree with Victor's comments here, while UC's coat looks very good, the shape of lapels could have been better. I think a bit of roll in the lapel would be nice, perhaps 3 button rolling over second button. As it is, those lapels cover most of his chest and throw off the balance. I would argue that lapels should be narrower or the roll should be above second button to balance things out.
post #9704 of 12823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Elfo View Post

Let's suppose that your premise is right (perfectionism leading to self-consciousness). We're humans, so no matter how pedantry we get on our choices, there will always be a bit of chaos. However, you stepped ahead of yourself and didn't asked the first question: perfection for whom? It's a personal concept of perfection, therefore it's my style. The elegance, however, is for you to judge.

 

Ok, yeah, perfect for whom? For oneself, I'd suppose. And because no fit is ever perfect for oneself (except when drunk or too n00b to understand), there might be an uneasiness around that others notice, leading to an impression of contrived dressing. For example, since reading SF I got rid of a lot of suits and jackets that I'd now find ill fitting in many ways - I couldn't wear them without the awareness of being dressed ridiculous in one way or the other, hence being uneasy and not being perceived as the cool stylish dude the ladies want.

 

I think the concept of 'worn-in' clothes works best to defeat that dilemma. Just wear good fitting stuff for a long time and you won't think about it anymore. That's what I'm going for now, anyway.

post #9705 of 12823

You contradicted yourself. If there will never be a perfect outfit and you're conscious about this, how can say that you will not be self-conscious about the demerits of your outfit? Also, if you have acknowledged that your taste has changed since you got here is only logical to assume that your taste will change over time. So your future you will probably think as low of your current style as you do about your old one. Unless you're not conscious about that, your comments about self-consciousness being a bad thing just make no sense to me.

My point of view: it's really difficult to achieve a perfect outfit (perfect within the subjective perspective of the wearer), because that perfect keeps on changing (not necessarily evolving); and, while being conscious about that, I enjoy what I've on simply because the other option is much more unpleasant.

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