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whnay.'s good taste thread - Page 327

post #4891 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
Also, you've paired it with dark grey trousers. Those should generally be avoided, as they have the distinct air of being orphaned from a suit.

 

Can I presume navy would have the same fault? If you kill navy and charcoal from your pant options, what are good staple colors to use?

post #4892 of 12603
S., regardless of how "fuzzy" you think the jacket is, it is a hard-finished worsted--not a handwoven tweed. That is not a matter of opinion. Also, "fuzzy" or not, the color and pattern are exceedingly meek for an odd jacket. So, yes, the critique most certainly applies.

Dark grey and charcoal are more formal colors for worsted suiting. Again, that is fact, not opinion. Hence, when you wear dark grey trousers like that, they look like they come from a suit since color is often the only thing to distinguish a pair of odd trousers from suit trousers.
post #4893 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick R View Post

Can I presume navy would have the same fault? If you kill navy and charcoal from your pant options, what are good staple colors to use?

Medium and light greys are most versatile in my experience. Also any manner of tan, brown, etc.
post #4894 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

How am I misreading history when you're saying exactly what I'm saying? "The white shirt was always been most formal option." Yes, exactly. The difference is that we are now free to wear less "correct" (i.e. more casual) shirting with our tailored clothing. A spectrum has opened up that wasn't as established before. Now that we have that spectrum available, we should be considerate of it when we dress. A suit is on the formal side of the tailored spectrum, and a tweed jacket is on the casual side. The same goes for white shirts and blue shirts, respectively. If I wear a more casual jacket, I should pick a more casual shirt.

In a way, we are arguing the same thing. I'm glad we have a greater spectrum of options to consider, which is why I'm baffled people don't want to consider all of the options.

White was always an option ... except on the Interwebz.
post #4895 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

S., regardless of how "fuzzy" you think the jacket is, it is a hard-finished worsted--not a handwoven tweed. That is not a matter of opinion. Also, "fuzzy" or not, the color and pattern are exceedingly meek for an odd jacket. So, yes, the critique most certainly applies.

Is a navy odd jacket also meek?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Dark grey and charcoal are more formal colors for worsted suiting. Again, that is fact, not opinion. Hence, when you wear dark grey trousers like that, they look like they come from a suit since color is often the only thing to distinguish a pair of odd trousers from suit trousers.

So, all those ivy folks in charcoal J Press trousers were wrong the whole time? I'll be damned.
post #4896 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Is a navy odd jacket also meek?

No, unless you are confusing what is ordinary with what is meek in context. In the context of an odd jacket, your faux tweed is meek. As a suiting, it would be fine. A navy blazer, done correctly, is what it should be. Your jacket is a naive bastardization.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

So, all those ivy folks in charcoal J Press trousers were wrong the whole time? I'll be damned.

I don't know who those "folks" are, but what J. Press sells is hardly infallible.
post #4897 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan 
No, unless you are confusing what is ordinary with what is meek in context. In the context of an odd jacket, your faux tweed is meek. As a suiting, it would be fine. A navy blazer, done correctly, is what it should be. Your jacket is a naive bastardization.

What is it bastardizing? It seems there is no room in your world for an odd jacket with a bit of subtle pattern. 'Tis a pity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan 
I don't know who those "folks" are, but what J. Press sells is hardly infallible.

You emphasize the wrong part of what I was saying. I'm talking about the people wearing them. You know, a historical basis for our current sartorial choices. The ivy tradition certainly qualifies as a valid antecedent of current classic tailored clothing, no?
post #4898 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch 
What is it bastardizing? It seems there is no room in your world for an odd jacket with a bit of subtle pattern. 'Tis a pity.

It's bastardizing in that your jacket is designed to echo a more defined and established form of odd jacket that you yourself appear completely unaware of. No, there is no room in my world for a faux tweed jacket with a subtle pattern. Just as there is no room for a green dinner suit. That's the world of classic menswear. The world you attempt to dabble in but don't understand. The point of this thread was originally to bring the language of that world back to Styleforum, but apparently it has failed since most of you don't even realize there's a language to learn.

This is Sparta?
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch 
You emphasize the wrong part of what I was saying. I'm talking about the people wearing them. You know, a historical basis for our current sartorial choices. The ivy tradition certainly qualifies as a valid antecedent of current classic tailored clothing, no?

As I stressed with Doc, historical examples exist for everything. The point of classic menswear is not to mimmic them, but to understand and learn from them.
post #4899 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

What is it bastardizing? It seems there is no room in your world for an odd jacket with a bit of subtle pattern. 'Tis a pity.

It's bastardizing in that your jacket is designed to echo a more defined and established form of odd jacket that you yourself appear completely unaware of. No, there is no room in my world for a faux tweed jacket with a subtle pattern. Just as there is no room for a green dinner suit. That's the world of classic menswear. The world you attempt to dabble in but don't understand. The point of this thread was originally to bring the language of that world back to Styleforum, but apparently it has failed since most of you don't even realize there's a language to learn.

This is Sparta?

I am aware, and I'm okay with the echo. I don't agree that this is the equivalent of a green dinner suit. I think you do me a disservice to assert that I am unaware that there's a language.
post #4900 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Clap, generally quite good. Hard to make out a lot of detail, though. Sure, the lapels are on the slim side, but not egregiously so. And they do complement your build.

But is that fucking folded silk in the last outfit? WTF, man.

 

quite good? given that I sneaked in a white shirt that's quite the compliment coming from :foo: =)

 

yes the last outfit has folded silk but it's vanda's kimono silk, shit's like 1mm in thickness. folds like french crêpe!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mktitsworth View Post

The line between the lapel and the top edge of the breast pocket is less than a centimeter. I think what you're seeing may be a combination of the skinny lapels (about which I agree with RDiaz), the angle, and the square being folded a bit thin. There was about three quarters of a centimeter of gap between the edge of the sqare and the interior seam of the welt on the breast pocket.

Also, thank you for saying I'm slim. I used to be rail thin - 140 lbs or so - and between two kids, divorce, remarriage, and graduate school I've shot up 60 then come back down 30 or so. I like this weight a lot more than either 140 or 200, however I'd rather given up on continuing to think myself thin. It is nice to hear.

 

yes that's the bane of skinny lapels. thanks don draper.

 

I wish my weight would change for once, I've been 220 lbs forever now and desperately try to gain... metabolism like a hummingbird.

post #4901 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron View Post

metabolism like a hummingbird.

You curse it now, but you should pray that you keep it.
post #4902 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

I think you do me a disservice to assert that I am unaware that there's a language.

Dude, then burn that jacket for a start. It is the equivalent of gibberish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron View Post

quite good? given that I sneaked in a white shirt that's quite the compliment coming from foo.gif =)

Didn't see a white shirt . . . I rescind everything I said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron View Post

yes the last outfit has folded silk but it's vanda's kimono silk, shit's like 1mm in thickness. folds like french crêpe!

Doesn't crêpe fold like shit too? Maybe you guys aren't understanding what I mean by not taking a fold well. No matter how thick the silk, it will not hold a sharp crease like linen. It will look rough, rumpled, disheveled, etc. That's how I was able to spot yours, even in such low resolution. It's an eyesore, truly.
post #4903 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Spread oxford is either an abomination or next-level. Really depends on the usage. Can't say I'm not curious!

I have one. I kinda like it.

It's white and I'll wear it with a heavy blazer or a flannel suit. It's formal enough for either of those occasions. I like the texture and it's ever-so slightly warmer for those rare occasions where I'm somewhat dressed up but outside for a bit.

If I got another, it would be blue-white striped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Well, it's really not orthodoxy specific to SF. Both "rules" read elsewhere and the genealogy of the collar are indicative, I think.

I think that this is an instance in which etymology isn't a very good guide to current useage.

The casualness of an open collared shirt is more than enough to overwhelm the difference in formality between collar styles.

I generally dislike seeing collar points. So unless you have a GDLstyle cutaway buttondown, I actually prefer a spread collar in this instance.

Provided, of course, it's a spread collar that's firm enough to not crumple or fall down.
post #4904 of 12603
I've thought about getting some oxford shirts as a spread collar (somewhat point though for balance) to wear with suits and ties. Why not?

Foo - you mentioned before about checked oxfords. I have some from some fabrics Peter Lee has lying around. They are great.
post #4905 of 12603
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron View Post

I wish my weight would change for once, I've been 220 lbs forever now and desperately try to gain... metabolism like a hummingbird.

Well, I'm sure you hear it a lot, but be glad it's not the other way around. Would rather struggle to gain weight than keep it off...

Edit: SB beat me to it! +1 I guess?
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