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Portugese and Spanish shoes - Page 5

post #61 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinchi22 View Post
+1


Economiayocio: Please keep up the good and CONSTRUCTIVE work on your blog. Love the IWC´s, too.

I'll do my best, and I will try to add content here too. Thanks and regards.
post #62 of 105
I forgot to say that there is a very nice brand in Mallorca , quite similar to Crocket and Jones.

The horrible dressed King of Spain wears those sometimes. I don´t recall the name . I tried them once, too rounded for my neapolitan tastes but were nice shoes, also there are a few bespoke $$$ on the Island .

More horrible shoes I know the owners ; Pikolinos ,Fluxos , Mustang etc etc.
post #63 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpallaCamiccia View Post
I forgot to say that there is a very nice brand in Mallorca , quite similar to Crocket and Jones.

The horrible dressed King of Spain wears those sometimes. I don´t recall the name . I tried them once, too rounded for my neapolitan tastes but were nice shoes, also there are a few bespoke $$$ on the Island .

More horrible shoes I know the owners ; Pikolinos ,Fluxos , Mustang etc etc.

It is true that there are bad brands, but there are at last 2 good. Think that Spain is very small as a country.

I am sure that, for example, in the US there will be hundreds of bad brands of shoes, and we really only talk about Alden and Allen Edmonds, that are in par with Carmina (under my point of view).

Those crappy spanish brands that I also hate, have their market in people that only care about price and not about quality. Many people here just can't understand why "all my shoes look the same" when they look at a Alden nº 8 cordovan and a C&J Audley Oxford in black for example.

We don't have that kind of culture in terms of shoes. It is a pity, but probably those brands win much more money than other that make excellent shoes but finally go under because of their prices.

Unfortunately, people here love beefroll loafers and were the same pairs everyday for 2 years until they chage them. It is a pity,

Some people will not wear bad shoes but think that a fake watch is cool. That, for someone that love watches, it is ourageous. What I am trying to say is that people in the world like different things, and that's where they put their efforts. It is good for me, because my shoes look much better comparing with the rest around here... I feel more special than someone that have Alden's all over the office.

But in terms of comparison, is not so easy to have in your country one really good brand (as we have Carmina). There are many bigger countries in the world that have none, and others that in size are 10 times bigger but only have 2... I undestand your point of view, but I think is better to focus on the good brands. I am sure that every country has it's cheap industry.
post #64 of 105
Another example of another grear Carmina Shoes. I reviewd them today on my blog, but here you have some pictures of them. I think they are great:






post #65 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by economiayocio View Post
Another example of another grear Carmina Shoes. I reviewd them today on my blog, but here you have some pictures of them. I think they are great:







Do you know the name of this last? I believe I have the same one and love the fit.
post #66 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrosals View Post
Do you know the name of this last? I believe I have the same one and love the fit.

The truth is.. .I don't. They fit great and go 1/2 a number below my usual size.
post #67 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by epa View Post
Most businessmen I see in Spain don't seem to do that much of walking. I don't have the impression that most Spanish businessmen walk more than, let's say, their Swedish or German colleagues. They often drive to lunch (many restaurants have guys who park your car so that you don't have to bother about that) and drive back a bit drunk (maybe less now than a few years ago, but still...).

The streets may be dirtier than the Swedish and German ones, but certainly not more rainy (unless you happen to live on the north coast, maybe). I am living in Madrid and most of my shoes are leather sole ones (with topys, but that is just gready me who want to preserve the soles to save money). If I were living in Sweden (especially, if living in Gothenburg), I would probably have a higher proportion of rubber soles in my rotation.

Yes, it seems that you must live in a drier place than Galicia (where I live!). I think this depends on what city you live in, too. No city in Galicia has a metro, and parking is utter madness anywhere, even in pay-garages. Not to mention we are the rainiest place in Spain, where leather soles are suicidal unless you have them "rubberized." That being said, I love leather soled shoes, but they are rather useless when it is pouring rain all day, every day, for 6 months. Hence the appeal of a shoe like Lottusse, ideal for one who must walk a lot and in adverse conditions. I just got some nice AE cordovans, and some Testoni wholecuts, and as much as it hurts, I think I am going to have to put some rubber on them rather than destroy them from "temporal" to "temporal!"
post #68 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahgspot View Post
Yes, it seems that you must live in a drier place than Galicia (where I live!).

I have two pair of Carminas with the Dainite(-like) sole. One also has a textured upper. They are indestructible in rainy weather.
post #69 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by economiayocio View Post
We don't have that kind of culture in terms of shoes. It is a pity, but probably those brands win much more money than other that make excellent shoes but finally go under because of their prices.

+1. I´ve lost track of the number of Spanairds with expensive Belfast jackets (aprox. $740 or €550) and cheap loafers. Around half of the buyers I´ve seen at Carmina are savvy foreigners.
post #70 of 105
Wow, what a can of worms I opened with my (slightly) ironic comments about Spain, walking, and dirty streets!

I can rectify to some extent by saying that the "dirty street" comment is one that can be applied to virtually any bustling city in the world. Of course, some are more dirty than others! And by dirty, I don't just mean trash-strewn. Madrid, for example, I find to suffer due to the air quality, which is one of the worst in Spain. Don't get me wrong--I love Madrid, and it is my favorite city in Spain!

Another issue I see here is vast generalization about Spanish shoemakers. One must remember that the big labels are not everything there is to offer in Spain. There are many small producers that simply don't have the ambition or the desire to expand along the lines of some of the big Mallorcan labels. This summer, in a village of Valladolid province, I learnt through word of mouth about a bespoke bootmaker who makes boots for under 160€, beautifully well done (I'll post pics when I receive them, hopefully next week). There are still some "holdouts" like this particular gentleman in Spain, where there *is* a strong tradition of artisanship and craftmanship deeply imbued in our culture. For example, the town of Ourense used to have a very strong hand-crafted shoe and boot tradition.

However, understandably, it is hard for a foreigner (even being one from some other part of Spain) to find out about such places/makers. And of course, in the globalized era, we are in the midst of a generation that on the whole prefers "labels" over quality. But I think this happens everywhere.

Regarding the polemic Portuguese shoe, there has been a sharp trend in the past 10 years to outsource products once made in Spain to Portugual. Inditex, Purificación García, etc are particularly guilty. Once, all of Massimo Dutti's suits were made in Spain, as well as their dress shirts and shoes. Now they are all made in Portugal. Can't speak about the quality, but I would definitely not buy a suit from them when I could get MTM of comparable quality from the internet. The shoes are design-driven and are of very mediocre quality (the cost, about 99€). In the major department store of Spain, El Corte Inglés, long known for the quality of their house labels, I've seen their house-label shoes all being made in Portugal, of very dubious quality. Poor leathers, blake-stitched with misaligned and missed stitches, etc. Retailing for about 100€.

Again, let us not generalize. I think these mediocre Portuguese shoes are more a question of retail drive to produce shoes at as low a cost as possible. The same labor might cost much more in Spain; the same quality from China might cost more to import. In the end, it is the retailer who demands a product at a particular price point that fits a certain image.
post #71 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinchi22 View Post
+1. I´ve lost track of the number of Spanairds with expensive Belfast jackets (aprox. $740 or €550) and cheap loafers. Around half of the buyers I´ve seen at Carmina are savvy foreigners.

Alas, the curse of the Spaniards... here people would rather pay 400€ for Prada boots than to track down the bootmaker who will do bespoke for less than half the price! Also, it's the "glamour" of replying to the question "who makes your shoes" with something like "Gucci" or "Carolina Herrera" instead of "Santiago, the old shoemaker of Pedrajas del Castillo!" The same reasons drive people to buy shoes from a brand like "Guy Laroche" or something, rather than a similarly priced shoe from George's, which is a well-made, Goodyear-welted shoe that the young yuppie would dismiss as an old-man shoe.

The reality is that the "old men" that I know (that are my family!) have made lasting fortunes in their life in the opposite way that the businessmen who helped create the crisis did. Often, by insisting on top quality before brand name. On substance before image, on utility before speculation.

In the end, there are savvy Spaniards; we are just overshadowed by the glitz of the super-retailers and new-rich spendthrifts.
post #72 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinchi22 View Post
I have two pair of Carminas with the Dainite(-like) sole. One also has a textured upper. They are indestructible in rainy weather.

Today they announced rain on the radio so I am wearing my Carmina brown suede rubbe sole derbies, great for rainy weather (and today I am wearing a tweed sportcoat so derbies are OK I think). And this afternoon, after the gym, I will pass by Carmine and try on a pair of black suede chelseas with rubber soles, for winter use. They did not have them in my size (10) last Friday, but they ordered a pair in that size from one of their other shops (the Palma one I think) and just called to tell me it arrived.

I mentioned somewhere the good service; I can only talk for the Claudio Coello shop, don't know how service is in the Serrano or Gran Vía ones.
post #73 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahgspot View Post
Alas, the curse of the Spaniards... here people would rather pay 400€ for Prada boots than to track down the bootmaker who will do bespoke for less than half the price!

I´d say it´s the universal curse of the brand name. Why buy from the unknown local cobbler if you can have this season´s Cole Hahn or Tommy Hilfiger shoes made in China?

What Spain still has is a disappearing caste of local artisans. For instance, there is a tiny shop in Madrid known as Castellanos with a small but loyal following. You can´t fit more than 6 people at a time in the shop (located at Hermosilla and Principe de Vergara), and the display models only fit in the storefront window or stacked up high. They are kind of a Spanish version of AE but on a miniature scale: traditional styles, AE-like pricing (around €150, or $190 AEs discounted) and only about a half dozen models/lasts.
post #74 of 105
Quote:

Again, let us not generalize. I think these mediocre Portuguese shoes are more a question of retail drive to produce shoes at as low a cost as possible. The same labor might cost much more in Spain; the same quality from China might cost more to import. In the end, it is the retailer who demands a product at a particular price point that fits a certain image.

+1

There is definitly no tradition, like in England or Italy, of handmaking shoes in Portugal( neither in Spain by the way).

Portugese shoemaker were once famous for their skills, but sadly we' re facing the same problems like mentioned above, people prefer brands not talent.

FWIW Portugal has a strong shoemaking "industry", that produces quantity not quality.

Alas there is a exemption to the norm, the makers behind "mackjames", have a high end shoe line, that are handcrafted and of good quality "Carlos Santos".

http://www.carlossantos.eu/1.aspx

Saludos de Portugal

P.s.

post #75 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahgspot View Post
Another issue I see here is vast generalization about Spanish shoemakers. One must remember that the big labels are not everything there is to offer in Spain. There are many small producers that simply don't have the ambition or the desire to expand along the lines of some of the big Mallorcan labels. This summer, in a village of Valladolid province, I learnt through word of mouth about a bespoke bootmaker who makes boots for under 160€, beautifully well done (I'll post pics when I receive them, hopefully next week). There are still some "holdouts" like this particular gentleman in Spain, where there *is* a strong tradition of artisanship and craftmanship deeply imbued in our culture. For example, the town of Ourense used to have a very strong hand-crafted shoe and boot tradition.


Hello everyone (this is my first post, even though I have been reading all of you for a long while),

I was born in Palencia and most of my family is over there, so I go there very often. When I saw that you knew a place for bespoke boots in Valladolid, I couldn't hold myself and finally I decided to register in the forum. I would like to ask you, what place is that? ¡Gracias!

Anyway, hopefully I will continue posting. I can't believe there are quite a few people in the forum who are from or live in Spain.

Saludos,
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