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Definitive "Books on Menswear" Thread - Page 8

post #106 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Received Loos' Why a Man Should be Well-Dressed the other day. I've only read a few chapters and skimmed the rest, but would say it's overall not terribly recommendable. There are a few amusing paragraphs, and it's nice to hear someone's voice about this subject from over a hundred years ago, but the historical material is thin and there aren't any practical or useful tips. Neither Esquire's Encyclopedia nor Flusser's Dressing the Man. Not bad if you're fine with spending ~$15 for a book you can finish within two hours or so, but probably not something you'll ever pick up again for reference.

Read Loos last summer, and agree: interesting for a few minutes otherwise not worth the time.
post #107 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

^Awesome post, thank you. I've bid on that set on eBay a couple of times but have yet to win it.

Is there a website where there are a lot of images from Apparel Arts available to look at? Or do you have to try to score old hard copies?
post #108 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allez Allez View Post



Is there a website where there are a lot of images from Apparel Arts available to look at? Or do you have to try to score old hard copies?

I'm sure there are others but off the top of my head, Maxminimus and The Trad blogspot both own impressive collections and have posted a number of scans. I'm sure if you just search Apparel Arts on their blogs, you'll see a lot. I think the London Lounge also had a member who scanned a few issues onto that forum in their entirety - but I think you may need to be a member now to access.
post #109 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

^Awesome post, thank you. I've bid on that set on eBay a couple of times but have yet to win it.

Those illustrations are inspiring. Many are rather expressive and dany-ish.

I wonder how long it will take for full leg, pleated trousers to become a mainstream fashion item once again?
post #110 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

Those illustrations are inspiring. Many are rather expressive and dany-ish.

I wonder how long it will take for full leg, pleated trousers to become a mainstream fashion item once again?

Dunno, but I'm not waiting. My newer trousers are cut similar. Not quite so full, but close.
post #111 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allez Allez View Post

Is there a website where there are a lot of images from Apparel Arts available to look at? Or do you have to try to score old hard copies?

For what it's worth, I've heard that every volume is available in the Fashion Institute of Technology's library. You could pay some student to scan every page for you. It sounds extreme, but professors hire students to do that kind of work all the time.

If you were able to do this, by the way, I'd gladly pay for part of the cost.
post #112 of 141
Or you can wait until the library tosses them. I have one that was stamped "discard" by Notre Dame. It still has the sticker with the university's call number on the top left corner. Summer 1936 issue. shog[1].gif
post #113 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Dunno, but I'm not waiting. My newer trousers are cut similar. Not quite so full, but close.

Plus One. Most of my winter flannels are cut very full in the leg. Some are definitely 1930s full cut - I love it.
post #114 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

For what it's worth, I've heard that every volume is available in the Fashion Institute of Technology's library. You could pay some student to scan every page for you. It sounds extreme, but professors hire students to do that kind of work all the time.

If you were able to do this, by the way, I'd gladly pay for part of the cost.

It's a good idea. Unfortunately, I'm a lazy git.
post #115 of 141

Fuck Yeah Menswear for sure

 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listing/2687673765870?r=1&cm_mmca2=pla&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-Book-_-Q000000633-_-2687673765870

post #116 of 141
I just finished The Allure of Men by Francois Baudot. Despite seeming like a picture book (which it kind of is), Baudot has a fairly worthwhile essay in here that takes the reader through a crash course history on the development of Western men's dress. It starts more or less in France, circa the 18th century or so, just before the rise of English influence/ hegemony. Some superficial theories on why the Brummell look became popular, and how the development of capitalism and the industrialism both led to ready-to-wear and the current state of Western fashion. Nothing terribly new or sophisticated, but it's a nice summary. Not as substantive as maybe The Mens' Fashion Reader, but certainly more worthwhile than most books in this field.

My only criticism is that while the essay is decent and the photos are beautiful, the two rarely go together. When Baudot talks about the French courts or The French Revolution, it would be nice if the accompanying photos were more relevant, instead of showcasing people such as Yohji Yamamoto or Clark Gable.

I do like that the book focuses on the "male allure," however. The text is mostly about clothing, but as a whole, the book tries to transcend. Somewhat in a way that's reminiscent of the threads about elegance over at The London Lounge.

I'd say it's worth picking up, but is certainly not a must have in the way Esquire's Encyclopedia or The Men's Fashion Reader might be.
post #117 of 141
[misposted reply, sry]
post #118 of 141
Here's the short review that I mentioned on Hochswender's book, Men In Style:

http://uptowndandy.blogspot.com/2013/04/men-in-style-golden-age-of-fashion-from.html
post #119 of 141
Has anyone read "Sleevehead's Guide to Sicilian Tailors?"

I am interested in the book to a) find provincial tailors in Sicily, and b) learn tailoring terms in Italian. Is it a worthwhile read?
post #120 of 141
Just skimmed "The Dandy, Peacock or Enigma?" by Nigel Rodgers, pub 2012.

Nice enough book, though I doubt there is much novel content: the usual Brummell, Balzac, Beerbohm etc but none the worse for it.
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