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Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions - Page 340

post #5086 of 17545

Is there any way to search auction listings by length of auction?  I would like to check listings that are on 1 & 3 day auctions.

 

Thanks

post #5087 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweets View Post
 

Is there any way to search auction listings by length of auction?  I would like to check listings that are on 1 & 3 day auctions.

 

Thanks

 

I think the best you can do is narrow by "newly listed" and then browse for the ones ending in the next day or so.  Or do you mean completed listings? Then....no, I don't think so.

post #5088 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post
 

 

I think the best you can do is narrow by "newly listed" and then browse for the ones ending in the next day or so.  Or do you mean completed listings? Then....no, I don't think so.

 

Ahh, good idea...i can do auctions ending within 24 hours, and then sort by newly listed and get items that were listed today...I'm going to keep an eye on these and see if there are deals to be had from impatient sellers.

post #5089 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoeluv View Post

That is the workroom of a very disturbed mind... If you were anymore organized I would vomit. My area looks like it should be on an episode of Hoarders. lol8%5B1%5D.gif
Srsly. Each time I pack ahead of time, my incidents of errant/crossed packages skyrockets. I don't do it anymore.

Also, I fell way behind on this threak. I just read tben's post about negging someone on here. I gotta know: was it me? patch[1].gif
post #5090 of 17545
No way I could ever pack ahead of time, too many multi-purchases. It would be a waste of packaging materials.

Also, since most of my stuff is used, I like the shipping to give me that very last pass to make sure there is no damage I missed. If I didn't take this step I'd have more returns.
post #5091 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnwes View Post
 

How many listings are we talking? I have about 425 listings at time and it seems it would take me a long time to find the right package that way. 

 

How I do it....

When an item gets a bid, I pull it to a separate "sale pending" rack. Once it's paid it's packed and shipped. I have a lot of buyers that buy 3 and 4 items at a time, so I would have to unbox and rebox those items.

 

Have been considering (for the somewhat distant future) buying and moving my set up into an old drycleaning place and using the automated hanging rack for inventory browsing. 

 

They make those for residential applications now. Sounds to me like it would go nicely above a 4 car garage.

post #5092 of 17545

Here is a list of tools i use aka "Tools of the Trade."

 

For loose threads and everything else. A+++

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90


Reusable lint brush A+++

 


Rowenta Iron made in Germany. A good iron will save you time and give your garments a professional look. Avoid the the Rowneta Irons made in Mexico/ China as they do not deliver the same results . A+++

 

 


A 1500 watt Conair steamer (Conair) . 1500 watts of steam gets the smell out of most items . :slayer:A +++++++++

 

 

 

Rowenta Stem'n Press : Sucks as a garment steamer / iron but can steam / iron ties perfectly . B+

 

 

 

All items were thrifted for 7.99 or less. Also always use distilled water in the steamers/irons as not clog the openings.

post #5093 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post


I tried that for a short while and it didn't work out. Only about half of the packaging turned out to be correct. International orders, multiple item orders, East Coast vs West Coast needing different Priority Mail boxes, etc.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GMMcL View Post


Srsly. Each time I pack ahead of time, my incidents of errant/crossed packages skyrockets. I don't do it anymore.
 
 
This organization comes from necessity.  As a manufacturer, streamlining processes is absolutely required for success.  When you have employees and overhead you need standardized, organized processes or the money will be pissed away in wasted movement and ruined work.  The first thing you learn is to handle work in process as little as possible.  To pick something up to photograph it, put it back, pick it up to measure it, put it back, then pick it up to package it is crazy.  The greatest books on the subject are by Eliyahu Goldratt: The Goal and It's Not Luck.  These books changed my life, no exaggeration.
post #5094 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by txwoodworker View Post

The greatest books on the subject are by Eliyahu Goldratt: The Goal and It's Not Luck. These books changed my life, no exaggeration.

Grabbing a copy today.

Also considering "its not luck" as a new tattoo.
post #5095 of 17545
Downloaded!

Originally Posted by txwoodworker

The greatest books on the subject are by Eliyahu Goldratt: The Goal and It's Not Luck. These books changed my life, no exaggeration.
post #5096 of 17545
The Goal is a great book, but I fear it won't be particularly meaningful to most. It is an allegorical book on a theory of production systems called the Theory of Constraints that boils down to the throughput of a production system is dependent upon the degree of variability in process times and the the speed of the slowest process in the system. Go any faster than that and a bottleneck will form at that process and all you do is spend money on inventory without producing saleable goods any faster.

I would say that theories that might be more interesting here would be those associated with the Toyoto Production System...Kanban, the elimination of muda, etc.
post #5097 of 17545
I have both of those Goldratt books and consider them to be a couple of the best business books I have ever read.

SeaJen mentions Japanese manufacturing methods. The ultimate end in this direction is single-batch flow, which is pretty much the opposite of this huge-batch packaging.

So if batch packaging for you, great, but it is a completely inefficient method for my business. I tried it and for the predictable reasons it did not work.
post #5098 of 17545
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaJen View Post

The Goal is a great book, but I fear it won't be particularly meaningful to most. It is an allegorical book on a theory of production systems called the Theory of Constraints that boils down to the throughput of a production system is dependent upon the degree of variability in process times and the the speed of the slowest process in the system. Go any faster than that and a bottleneck will form at that process and all you do is spend money on inventory without producing saleable goods any faster.

I would say that theories that might be more interesting here would be those associated with the Toyoto Production System...Kanban, the elimination of muda, etc.

 

I could never get into that Toyota 6 Sigma high level shit. The best thing about the Goldratt books is that they are a fantastic read that keeps you engaged better than any system text book can. You learn by osmosis.

 

quote-

So if batch packaging for you, great, but it is a completely inefficient method for my business. I tried it and for the predictable reasons it did not work.

 

The only predictable reason I can think of is you're not doing it methodically and thoughtfully.  I agree that repackaging would be rework and not efficient, but FOR ME, and for the people that don't combine shipping, the same packaging works domestically or internationally.  Also, it's not batch processing no matter how you look at it, I'm taking a single item from rack to box doing all the necessary processes in one go.  I don't process the pictures and list one at a time, but I have thought of it.  I think mentally it's too much of switching gears.  If I had a full time helper, that would be the way to go, it would probably take as much time to list as it does to do the other steps.

Also, little things like taking the pictures in the order you want them in the listing, getting all the angles and exposure right so you don't have to post process. Now if I could only get my camera to automatically rotate the pictures (it has a setting for it, but I either don't know how it works, or it just doesn't do it right.)


Edited by txwoodworker - 9/7/13 at 7:56am
post #5099 of 17545
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You rang?
post #5100 of 17545

We tried that Lean approach at my last company (market & media research), and it was a total waste of time, not to mention the "expert" was running a racket.  He'd written several books (OK, maybe 2 or 3) on the topic and was considered a guru of sorts, but - this was market research - every project (product) was custom.  The guy we hired assured us that Lean could be adapted to our business model, and he got paid, and in the end everyone agreed it was a waste of money.  It applies well if you have a finite number of items / options - even if it's 6,000 variations when you're building a car and take into consideration the trim, drive train, interior / exterior colors, options etc - it's still a finite number.  Our variations were infinite and were dictated by the customer. 

 

If you're trying to apply Lean or whatever to flipping on eBay, I suppose the best you can do is set up your listing templates, set up your photo area and camera settings, set aside a dedicated pack & ship area that has flow, and utilize the USPS options for free packaging / discounts / pick-up.  Over & above that, you'll still have to treat every item as unique in some way.  I'm far from lean nor do I have any flow, nor do I want to - that's more like work - and at any moment I can see myself saying "fuck it" and donating everything to a GW the next time I get infuriated with an eBay buyer.  

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