or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions - Page 1961

post #29401 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

 

 

Yes,.. raw = right out of the camera like you are shooting.

Ok, cool, I'm keeping up with the Joneses then!! Nice! Though, ain't got no time to edit, I just try to get it right before I click.....which I would assume could possibly take me longer.

 

 

* Note, with fixed studio lighting it would be minimal, I think. Since I shoot in natural light, I am constantly adjusting due to sun location and cloud cover. Fortunately, it's really become second nature.


Edited by capnwes - 9/6/16 at 6:30am
post #29402 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

Looks great. Is the overhead just to light up the room for working? Can't image it actually providing any light when the strobes go off....  love how I can have bright sunlight coming in the window on the object and it has no affect on the photo as the strobes are so powerful.

 

Also interested your shooting at 1/250...... Anything over 1/160 on my d5100 starts to cut off the bottom of the photo. Don't think the shutter if fast enough...

 

Can you bring the backlights down and increase the main lights a day to remove some of the backwash and still keep the pure white?

 

Yes,.. raw = right out of the camera like you are shooting.

If I drop the backlight, I have to edit the top and bottom 10-15% of the photos.

 

The Alienbees support 1/250 so that's where I started. The only problem I've had is dragging my thumb on the thumbwheel and accidentally changing it to 1/320.

 

I also thrifted a light meter which really helped get the exposure right. The back drop reads a bit less than 2 stops difference. efforts to close the gap by raising the fronts a bit didn't make it any better and this had less editing.

 

I shoot RAW as well because it is best for color correction (I use a white/grey card for reference at the beginning of each shoot). RAW is a format like JPEG, TIF, or other but with full resolution. Most other formats are compressing the image. When I am done with Lightroom, I export a JPEG and size them down to work with GS. That's another task the software handles for me. If I didn't do color correction, I would change my settings to shoot jpeg at a max size of 2000 x 2000 pixels. The old version of GS supported images up to 1000 x 1000 iirc so I drag in my jpegs and they manage the sizing for their app and for ebay uploading.

 

My overhead does help somewhat, even though using umbrellas raises the light source a couple of feet. My overhead is actually two fixtures, a 4 bulb and a 2 bulb florescent, loaded with T8 6500K bulbs. If nothing else, it makes my room brighter. I have another 4 bulb florescent suspended over my worktable.

 

this overhead light is a remnant of when I was shooting using continuous lighting.

 

As to whether it matters, if I could have gotten a consistent gray I wouldn't have worried about it but I never seemed to get there. The only constant was getting to solid white. OCD sucks.

post #29403 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

 

 

Yes,.. raw = right out of the camera like you are shooting.

Actually I looked more into it, and I am not shooting RAW. I shoot in Medium/Fine, and have RAW turned off.

post #29404 of 30442

couple quick thoughts:

 

- if you're camera is cutting off images over 1/200 second then something is wrong with your rig. IRL outdoor exposure rule of thumb is around f11 or f16 @ ISO . which is (for film anyways but the rule holds with digital) often 200 or 400ths of a second. in broad daylight there's nowhere to go with those numbers. $.02.

 

- re: washing out a backdrop try a significantly larger aperture setting to see if/how that changes the color rendering - that may achieve what you want. smaller apertures = sharper backgrounds. larger aperture = bokeh. it may help to move your subject away from your background if you can.

 

* you may also look at slight underexposure in tandem with slightly higher contrast but keep a weather eye on your subject's color. 

 

- with RAW, your camera has internal software that processes down your pics into jpeg or whatever. that software doesn't work for some people's needs, so they'll download the RAW formatted pics onto a remote pic processor (like your PC with your preferred software). i will use it sometimes when i can't get what i want out of the camera but it's a PITA and timesuck so i try to focus on getting the right product out of the camera when i'm shooting.

post #29405 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post

 

Also interested your shooting at 1/250...... Anything over 1/160 on my d5100 starts to cut off the bottom of the photo. Don't think the shutter if fast enough...

 

sorry i wasn't thinking clearly when i read this at first - you're using flash, yes?

 

google high speed sync d5100. there may be a solution if that's actually an issue there may be a setting or workaround or something.

post #29406 of 30442

Anyone interested in Digital Photography may be interested in this:

 

http://www.diyphotography.net/stanford-professor-puts-entire-digital-photography-course-online-free/

post #29407 of 30442
Please add tuan4sale and authentictn to your BBLs.

Short version: I'm a small seller, high end used shoes and accessories with a few jackets, very discriminating generally. I provide high-resolution pics (not professional, but decent enough quality to let a buyer make an informed decision), disclose any issues in exhaustive detail, and provide detailed dimensions. I have a no-returns (unless SNAD) policy, specifically for people like our star pupil here. I made two major exceptions in his case, for the first and last times.

So, Mr. Ngo made an offer on a near-new recent Zegna solid-satin tie I had for sale. As I always do with buyers who make offers, I checked his feedback - feedback left for others, as that is the only feedback that counts anymore when weighing buyers. I saw some objectionable enough items (although mostly over a year old) to make me not want to do business with him, that marked him as a PITA. I declined his offer and blocked him. Within minutes, a buyer with similarities in his handle, from the same area (NYC), made a BIN for the tie.

I messaged authentictn (Mr. Ngo) and asked if, in fact, he had a second ID as tuan4sale (the original buyer who made the offer). He admitted he was. I called eBay, reported it to a CSR, and promptly canceled the sale and sent Mr. Ngo a message explaining the rationale and warning him sternly about buying under alternate IDs after being blocked.

He replied first with an apology, then a second message asking me to reconsider. Well, there was my mistake ... I did. I unblocked the authentictn ID, let him buy it, and shipped it out.

A few days later I get this:

Hello I receive your tie today. It is an excellent tie but it looks so big on me that it cover a good portion of my chest. I understand you made an agreement on me buying it. However, I cant wear this due to the large portion size. I will ship back to you for a refund. the tie will be int the same packaging and condition it was send. My apologies.


Again against my better judgment, I agreed to let him return it, as long as it was shipped back in the same condition received.

Today I got it - folded into quarter sections in a paper #10 envelope (it was sent in a zip-top baggie inside a Priority Small Flat box). Miraculously, it wasn't destroyed by USPS. However, it did have a small but noticeable shiny stain on the face that looked like a dried tendril of spittle (probably from when he sealed the envelope). I sent him detailed photos of the tie as received, denied his refund, and am shipping it back within 2 days.

Bottom line, avoid this clown.
post #29408 of 30442
Guy opens a return for "not as described" on a Viyella flannel shirt I sold. He claims it's too small and "must be a women's medium".

This is the listing.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/322096244489

Should I just take the NAD return, or can I fight it?
post #29409 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by GetBlatzed View Post

Guy opens a return for "not as described" on a Viyella flannel shirt I sold. He claims it's too small and "must be a women's medium".

This is the listing.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/322096244489

Should I just take the NAD return, or can I fight it?

Well you can definitely fight something like that. You don't have listed measurements, you have actual images of the shirt measured, proving in an unarguable fashion what the measurements are. It just comes down to whether or not you want to fight this guy based on principle or just say fuck it, its 22 bucks and just relist it and move on. I'll leave my decision if in your shoes out of the equation entirely. 

post #29410 of 30442

It's as described, how could it not be when you have pictures of the measurements.  Seems like a buyers remorse argument.  There's no ambiguity there.

post #29411 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 

I have been striving to get to zero editing but still getting the white background you are getting. I import my photos into light room and discovered that if I bump up the highlights and the whites to 40 each, that it whites out the background. So I just did 250 or so shots and had to edit maybe 10-12.

 

what a relief.  This shot is shot on a nikon d7100, f16, shutter 1/250 into lightroom. On import to lightroom, import filter adjusts white balance, and bumps the highlights and the whites. so still edited, but zero touch editing.

 

If you're using Lightroom, try playing with Match Total Exposure. Under Settings > Match Total Exposure. You can select all photos you wish to adjust, select the photo you wish to use as a reference, click Match Total Exposure (also Command+Shift+M), and Lightroom will adjust all your selected photos to the exposure based on your reference. Matters more for me because my setup doesn't provide close to pure backgrounds consistently.

post #29412 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lirum View Post
 

 

If you're using Lightroom, try playing with Match Total Exposure. Under Settings > Match Total Exposure. You can select all photos you wish to adjust, select the photo you wish to use as a reference, click Match Total Exposure (also Command+Shift+M), and Lightroom will adjust all your selected photos to the exposure based on your reference. Matters more for me because my setup doesn't provide close to pure backgrounds consistently.


Good tip. I'll take a look at it.

 

Though I'm getting pretty OK with exposure, if this simplifies the process more, I'm in.

post #29413 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 


Good tip. I'll take a look at it.

 

Though I'm getting pretty OK with exposure, if this simplifies the process more, I'm in.


Not an eBay seller but I do some photography from time to time. A few suggestions and questions for you; as always YMMV

 

1. Are you shooting tethered? If not, would strongly suggest looking into tethered shooting as your shots will go directly to your computer and onto your monitor for easier/faster review

2. Getting nice even white backgrounds can be a bit challenging. In general, you should be lighting the subject and the background (BG) independently. It helps to move your subject away from the backdrop if your space allows. 6 feet is nice if you can do it. What kind of light modifier are you using on your BG strobes (umbrella, soft box, strip box, etc)? If you haven't already done this, spend a little time looking at the pattern of the light that your BG strobes are throwing onto your backdrop and seeing if you can even it out, first by changing the positions of the strobes (roughly should be pointing 45 deg towards BG level with camera, not pointing up or down) and then by changing your modifier(s) if necessary. The last thing you should do is dial up the BG strobe power to compensate for an uneven lighting pattern, which leads to light spilling back onto your main subject. If you can't get your subject far enough away from BG to avoid light spillover, you can try placing a sheet of white foam core between each BG strobe and your subject. This also provides some fill from your mains onto the sides of your subject.

3. Custom white balance

4. Once you have the above dialed in, consider going back to JPG at the smallest size necessary for web use. This will speed up your transfer and processing time compared to RAW.

 

One minor detail--why f16? This really cuts down on the light getting from your strobes into your camera. As you probably know, exposure with strobes is a function of strobe power and lens aperture and not shutter speed. Maybe you're doing this because you're otherwise getting too much ambient light from your continuous lighting? I'd personally ditch the continuous lighting and rely only on your 'Bees. 


Edited by breakaway01 - 9/7/16 at 6:06am
post #29414 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by double00 View Post
 

 

sorry i wasn't thinking clearly when i read this at first - you're using flash, yes?

 

google high speed sync d5100. there may be a solution if that's actually an issue there may be a setting or workaround or something.


D5100 max sync speed is only 1/200. This is why you are seeing a part of the frame cut off at 1/250. The shutter isn't fully open at 1/250 when the flash fires. 

post #29415 of 30442
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakaway01 View Post
 


Not an eBay seller but I do some photography from time to time. A few suggestions and questions for you:

 

1. Are you shooting tethered? If not, would strongly suggest looking into tethered shooting as your shots will go directly to your computer and onto your monitor for easier/faster review

2. Getting nice even white backgrounds can be a bit challenging. In general, you should be lighting the subject and the background (BG) independently. It helps to move your subject away from the backdrop if your space allows. What kind of light modifier are you using on your BG strobes (umbrella, soft box, strip box, etc)? If you haven't already done this, spend a little time looking at the pattern of the light that your BG strobes are throwing onto your backdrop and seeing if you can even it out, first by changing the positions of the strobes (roughly should be pointing 45 deg towards BG level with camera, not pointing up or down) and then by changing your modifier(s) if necessary. The last thing you should do is dial up the BG strobe power to compensate for an uneven lighting pattern, which leads to light spilling back onto your main subject. If you can't get your subject far enough away from BG to avoid light spillover, you can try placing a sheet of white foam core between each BG strobe and your subject. This also provides some fill from your mains onto the sides of your subject.

3. Custom white balance

4. Once you have the above dialed in, consider going back to JPG at the smallest size necessary for web use. This will speed up your transfer and processing time compared to RAW.

 

One minor detail--why f16? This really cuts down on the light getting from your strobes into your camera. As you probably know, exposure with strobes is a function of strobe power and lens aperture and not shutter speed. Maybe you're doing this because you're otherwise getting too much ambient light from your continuous lighting? I'd personally ditch the continuous lighting and rely only on your 'Bees. 


1. I don't shoot tethered. I have wifi on my camera but the thing is slow and its faster to just move the memory cards. I would trip over the cord too.

2. my background is white mylar that is backlit with two alien bees strobes with the standard reflectors aimed at the back wall. subject is about 4-5 feet in front of my background. The light spilling from the back is a compromise between available space and flash settings. It reflects off the back wall, lights the mylar, and some bleeds back on the mannequin 4 feet away. I've played with angles, built custom stands to hold specific cross over patterns. This set up generates the least editing of all my other iterations. I overthink this stuff big-time. I'll spare u the details.

3. Always set with a whitecard at the beginning of every shoot.

4. I go to jpg to get into garage sale. They supported 1000px shots until this current release, and now seem to support 1200px.

 

I use f16 because the light meter I hang on the neck of the mannequin reads f16 when the flashes fire. that simple. I get an exposure that is consistent, the tone of blue on the shirt stays the same from item to item.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions