or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions - Page 1210

post #18136 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

You have way more light then me. The key to getting the background pure white is that you need to get light behind the object that is brighter then the light hitting the object itself.

 

It's near impossible if you are doing this with only lights from the front unless you have barndoors or a setup to control the light direction and keep it off the object itself as whatever light you are shooting will be lighting the object and the background at the same exposure level so you will need to overexpose the object to get a white background.


Right! totally agree. I have 10 CFL's in the 2 clouds and 2 4ft tubes focused on the backdrop. I get a pretty reasonable white background....not perfectly white. But even though I want that, I think the next step would be offsetting the backdrop from the wall 6" or so and using a flash/synchro. That would take me a while to figure out and just not sure its worth it for me.

 

On a semi-related note, I got a nice message from a buyer today. I'm sure he tells this to all the sellers.

 

"I wish to extend my sincere compliments to whomever took the time to document AND photograph this Brioni suit in such amazing detail. On a scale of 1-10 it is an 11. Better than any other suit presentation I have seen on eBay.

 

- mr.stratosphere"

 

Surely some hyperbole there, but still appreciated.

post #18137 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoogz View Post
 


Can you just dedicate lights for the backdrop itself, without them hitting the target?

 

Also, has anyone tried lighting from behind the backdrop itself?

you can.

 

just need to flag the lights.  or you V flat the lights and then stand the subject in front of the , put the key light on the subject at a stop and a half to two stops under the bg light and you'll get the white bg.  

post #18138 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

I have 2 lights dedicated for the background and 2 for the object. The lights for the background are brighter then the lights for the object. I don't have an overhead light.

 

 

no kidding.  the only time i make sure the bg is perfectly white is when i actually get paid for the shots.  

 

this was a 4 light setup.  

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

2 lights for the background at F/16, you'll see two rectangular highlights in her eyes.  The one on top is the key  light (or the subject light); that's F/9; the light on the bottom was f/5.6.  So basically the background lights were just under 2 stops more intense than the key, and then the fill at f/5.6 was another stop less intense than the key, basically using that as fill light to soften up the shadows.  Anytime I need to shoot stuff that iinvolves makeup / hair in the studio to showcase the work, I'll make darn sure the background is white.  Otherwise, it's one light.  LIke this I sold last month:

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

one light with a white wall on camera right.  honestly if i wasn't so frigging lazy I can go to photoshop, use the levels mask, click the white on the grey and then just paint back the jacket w/o affecting it; gaussian blur the mask and it'd look pretty much all white.  But I don't do any ps stuff unless I see a check FOR it :lol:  Not having a pure white bg hasn't hurt the small amount of items I put up fs.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 


I believe if you step up to the 7100, it moves the autofocus engine into the camera body which opens up the lens options you will have.

u are correct.  i don't use a 7100, but def get a body with an inbody af motor.  

post #18139 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 

 

 

 

 

And I still want a whiter background and more light on the front of suits, jackets etc....

 

If you can point that overhead light towards the camera, and then just use the two squarish softboxes as your subject light, you've already gotten yourself a white background.

 

right now the reason why you are getting the gradient is this:

 

the light from the strip box is bleeding into the subj, which explains why the sides are washed out.  that plus the o/h light will give you the white bg, because there are basically three light sources hitting that area.  The lower of the frame, the o/h light has already fell off, so it's basically just from the stripbox.   you're metering for the subj light which if I assume are the two squarish softboxes.  

 

quickest fix is this:  whatever bulb you are using in the strip boxes, give it more juice, or put brighter bulbs in it.  buy some black foamcores and tape them together so they form a V.  place stripbox inside the V with the V flanking the subject on both sides.  

 

now you just prevented the spill of the stripbox from hitting the subject and causng that washed out effect, shoot as you would using the two square softbox as your subject light and voila; minimally more equipment to get what you want.  if you're shooting a longer jacket, sandwich the subject by having one of the softboxes higher pointed down, with the other lower pointed up, on camera axis.  the black won't give you bounce fill on the subject's sides, but if after experimentation you don't like the look, just get white bristol boards to cover up the black side that faces the subject and you'll get your white bounce back.  

 

hope that helped.  

post #18140 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by borbor View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianpore View Post
 

I have 2 lights dedicated for the background and 2 for the object. The lights for the background are brighter then the lights for the object. I don't have an overhead light.

 

 

no kidding.  the only time i make sure the bg is perfectly white is when i actually get paid for the shots.  

 

this was a 4 light setup.  

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

2 lights for the background at F/16, you'll see two rectangular highlights in her eyes.  The one on top is the key  light (or the subject light); that's F/9; the light on the bottom was f/5.6.  So basically the background lights were just under 2 stops more intense than the key, and then the fill at f/5.6 was another stop less intense than the key, basically using that as fill light to soften up the shadows.  Anytime I need to shoot stuff that iinvolves makeup / hair in the studio to showcase the work, I'll make darn sure the background is white.  Otherwise, it's one light.  LIke this I sold last month:

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

one light with a white wall on camera right.  honestly if i wasn't so frigging lazy I can go to photoshop, use the levels mask, click the white on the grey and then just paint back the jacket w/o affecting it; gaussian blur the mask and it'd look pretty much all white.  But I don't do any ps stuff unless I see a check FOR it :lol:  Not having a pure white bg hasn't hurt the small amount of items I put up fs.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 


I believe if you step up to the 7100, it moves the autofocus engine into the camera body which opens up the lens options you will have.

u are correct.  i don't use a 7100, but def get a body with an inbody af motor.  

Love you camera/light knowledge!! I've done this by trial and error and reading online.

post #18141 of 18150

My apologizes if this is being stated for the second, third, or fourth time.

 

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe sometime early 2015 Hassle Free Returns will be mandatory. 

post #18142 of 18150

For those interested in a super cheap and easily broken down photo set-up (repost):

 

 

 

 

 

(2) 3x 5500K lamp trees (Walmart)

(2) 1x 5500K clamp lamp (Walmart)

Window Shade (Home Depot)

 

Is it perfectly white?  No.  But it's sure a lot less hassle.  

post #18143 of 18150

Capitalist flip brag. Had some items go for way more than they should have tonight, this being the craziest. Average price for all my sales tonight was $73+shipping. Must be the holiday spirit!

post #18144 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post
 


I believe if you step up to the 7100, it moves the autofocus engine into the camera body which opens up the lens options you will have.


Actualy, the 7000 also has an in-body AF motor, so it can handle screw-drive (non AF-S) lenses.

I used to have the 7000 and upgraded to the 7100 for better sports AF.

The D7000 is a nice body for that price. 

post #18145 of 18150

Guys,

 

Trying to ship a suit to greece and ebay tool won't give me an express option. I know some of you only ship express. Is this a setting I've somehow messed up? I can do it from the post office site, but if I do it from ebay, its $44 vs $56 at the post office.

 

Any ideas?

 

jb

post #18146 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by borbor View Post
 

 

If you can point that overhead light towards the camera, and then just use the two squarish softboxes as your subject light, you've already gotten yourself a white background.

 

right now the reason why you are getting the gradient is this:

 

the light from the strip box is bleeding into the subj, which explains why the sides are washed out.  that plus the o/h light will give you the white bg, because there are basically three light sources hitting that area.  The lower of the frame, the o/h light has already fell off, so it's basically just from the stripbox.   you're metering for the subj light which if I assume are the two squarish softboxes.  

 

quickest fix is this:  whatever bulb you are using in the strip boxes, give it more juice, or put brighter bulbs in it.  buy some black foamcores and tape them together so they form a V.  place stripbox inside the V with the V flanking the subject on both sides.  

 

now you just prevented the spill of the stripbox from hitting the subject and causng that washed out effect, shoot as you would using the two square softbox as your subject light and voila; minimally more equipment to get what you want.  if you're shooting a longer jacket, sandwich the subject by having one of the softboxes higher pointed down, with the other lower pointed up, on camera axis.  the black won't give you bounce fill on the subject's sides, but if after experimentation you don't like the look, just get white bristol boards to cover up the black side that faces the subject and you'll get your white bounce back.  

 

hope that helped.  

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to explain that. I've evolved through trial and error and reading online. I am not sure I understand everything you said here, but I will work on it.

 

my bulbs in  the softboxes are 45w CFLs @6500K. I had ordered some 12" by 30" soft boxes for the rear application but they sent 24" x 30" and didn't have the narrow ones, so I've kept the larger ones.

 

I have realized I needed to fix the flare on the sides of items, which I had planned to do by moving the table forward out of the path of the soft boxes....I'll try your suggestions.

post #18147 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by breakaway01 View Post
 


Actualy, the 7000 also has an in-body AF motor, so it can handle screw-drive (non AF-S) lenses.

I used to have the 7000 and upgraded to the 7100 for better sports AF.

The D7000 is a nice body for that price. 


Did not know that. Now you've got me wanting to spring for one of those.

post #18148 of 18150

Looks like I have to call eBay again. Funny message, though

 

Quote:
 Hi there, Well, gosh darn it, as a seller like you, I am not a big fan of returns, but I am not having luck with my latest round of Ferragamos. This is the second pair I will have returned. Unfortunately, these ones have had a pretty poor paint job done on the gancini bits. Looks like silver paint for scale models. Too bad, as they are not too bad otherwise. I ll get them in the mail tomorrow. Best regards, David

Funny guy as a seller wouldn't have returned via "Doesn't match listing" since they know how much bullshit that rains upon other sellers. Although I assume that's the actual game plan.

post #18149 of 18150
so i just sold a brioni blazer for $300. pumped. but the buyer only has 1 feedback.

we all start somewhere, but how can i best protect myself against any silly stuff?
post #18150 of 18150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post


Actually, in terms of wall real estate, That isn't too bad. It looks to me like its 58-60" wide and 8.5-9' tall.

I'm guessing the doors are 24 or 28" which would mean  with them both open, they'd be a foot apart. That's plenty of room but you'll have to gear up for anything not on a mannequin. I would mount a 4 foot fixture above the closet doors trim.., follow handershunds pattern of the side lights (same flourescents as troffer x 3), and invest $70 into 2 clouds for the front shoot.

those would have to be moved after each shoot, as would a table. ......oh hell, I'll just diagram it.....






My $.02


whoa. just saw this. what an amazing response. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif



MUCH appreciated. going to look into all this now. that hanging fixture looks...complicated
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Buying and Selling on eBay: Tips, Tricks, Problems & Questions