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Non-Rule "Rules" - Page 6

post #76 of 733
My non-button down shirts are made with two-button mitered cuffs, placket, and no pocket. My sport coats are made with patch hip pockets and breast welt pocket.

I can't explain why I don't vary the configurations. I always consider changing something up and then don't.
post #77 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

No amount of Hail Mary's will save you from ... always going beltless though.

 

What if the belt is built into the trouser? Boom!

 

1000

post #78 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

1) No french cuffs with odd jackets.
2) No capes with office pants.
3) Odd jacket and no tie always requires a button down collar.
4) No black shoes with khaki pants.
Some of these, especially the cape one, may be too restrictive so feel free to suggest amendments.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

many of these are honest to god RULES rules, like no black shoes with khakis, come on, that's ironclad.


But of course. The colors are just awful in combination.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

I actually like black, wingtip gunboats with khakis confused.gif

See above. It's a bad look, and whenever I see it, I think, 'random IT guy who only owns one pair of "dress" shoes'. I've never before seen someone who knows how to dress try that one, and there's a pretty good reason for that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Well, I suppose I should have added another personal rule.
5) A suit always requires a tie.
But I think that this is an actual rule even though it is regularly violated by style icons like Ahmadinejad.

It's debatable these days. Most of the objection seems to be based on social convention about formality rather than any sort of aesthetic judgement, which I pretty much always defer to. Conventions change, and the people whining about rules of formality tend to just be objecting since those particular conventions have already changed, just in a way they don't like. I still stick to that one though, just because most suits these days are so incredibly boring that when you remove the tie, the entire ensemble just becomes incredibly uninteresting. Try it with a loud shirt, and it can work, or do it in some other way that adds visual interest, but it seems like most who try just use their standard plain white or blue office shirts, but omit the tie in order to achieve a lower level of formality. The fact that they look bad doing it isn't really considered.

I go tieless often, but with a sportcoat. The contrast between jacket and trousers, if nothing else (like a pattern on shirt and sportcoat), adds something else for the eye to ponder.

As for other personal rules? I don't wear plain captoes. Punchcap, yes. Medallion? Sure. But I find that captoes are just incredibly boring, and there are other alternatives that suit any level of formality, short of black tie, more than well enough.

I don't wear long sleeved shirts without either the sleeves rolled up, or some additional layer, unless I've removed my jacket temporarily. If it's hot enough and informal enough where I don't need a sweater or jacket, I roll the sleeves up or switch to a polo, and either option, to me, looks better than the plain dress shirt.

I don't wear solid ties, apart from a green knit I have. Probably just my fear of boring again. I occasionally do three pattern combinations, but usually two or one, and the solid is always either the jacket or the shirt. Very different from most here in that regard, I suspect.

I try to pick a pen out that goes with my outfit each morning. I'm sure absolutely nobody ever notices, especially since I don't own any gaudy pens (a category I put most of the stuff pen collectors freak over in), but it amuses me.
post #79 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Pfffftt.
From Reeves, I can understand. But from you, Manton? What country are you from?

Right? I think that with a more casual suit, and in a boxier cut, a center vent looks better.

One rule that I hate to violate, and I know that this probably goes for no one else, especially here: I absolutely will not wear more than 2 items from one brand, designer, contemporary, or "tailored" clothing, at the same time. I hate the idea that I'm being completely or in large part styled by someone else. Not that my personal styling is all that stellar.
post #80 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

re: suits without ties, the only time I do this is when I am travelling and I don't want to pack the suit and I don't want to bother with a tie. Makes me feel vaguely sketchy, like a pick up artist, mobster, or professional con man.

I know that this is anathema to you, but sometimes I like to look slightly sketchy - especially if I'm wearing a suit - like Tom Cruise's contract killer in Collateral. But Asian. And less good looking. I guess that it's a reaction to coming from a decent family in a town where there were a lot of very sketchy people.
post #81 of 733

If S/B I always wear suits with centre vent, double is for horses and besides a centre vent will always look slimmer from the front.

I always wear a Windsor knot when the tie is silk. half windsor for knitted. Fore in hand is for schoolboys

I always iron own my own shirts, I can't stand collars that curl at the tips and I never wear collar stays ( they don't work)

Only Vicars and waiters wear black socks, 

I will never wear pointy shoes that protrude way beyond the toe and curl like Aladin's slippers

post #82 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendon View Post

If S/B I always wear suits with centre vent, double is for horses and besides a centre vent will always look slimmer from the front.

I always wear a Windsor knot when the tie is silk. half windsor for knitted. Fore in hand is for schoolboys

I always iron own my own shirts, I can't stand collars that curl at the tips and I never wear collar stays ( they don't work)

Only Vicars and waiters wear black socks, 

I will never wear pointy shoes that protrude way beyond the toe and curl like Aladin's slippers

What? A center vent derives from horseback riding.

post #83 of 733

Double-Breasted Suit = Twin Vents

Single Breasted Suit = No Vents

 

Never wear tasselled loafers

 

Never wear button down shirts (not that you can buy them here - seems to be a seriously American thing)

 

Never wear contrast collar/cuff shirts

post #84 of 733
I don't wear a watch that often anyway, but I never wear one after six.
post #85 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

This is an actual "rule"

I actually follow this "rule" as it was suggested by the owner of a small mens wear store where I've never been led astray. But the question remains, is a center vent used for sport coats and side vents for suits (I'm too lazy today to go into the closet to look and I'm also afraid of what I may find!!).
post #86 of 733
Thread Starter 
So far as I know, the center vent originated on English riding coats. But a long time ago, the 30s at the latest, the English had stopped making them on lounge jackets, i.e., what we would call a suit or odd jacket. They would make them either non or side vented. Back then, non-vented was more popular than side, but over the years that changed, I'm not sure when the tipping point was, but when I first showed up on Savile Row in 1989, everything was side-vented.

American jackets were virtually all center-vented until designer clothes started getting popular here in the '80s. Nowadays you can find any vent configuration in an American shop, though Brooks and its ilk still sell the center vent.

I also believe that a traditional English hacking jacket with a high three-button, short lapel roll stance (meaning you're supposed to button all three buttons) will still take a center vent. It's been a while since I have seen one of these though and I have never owned one.

I believe vox rides, maybe if he is lurking he can break his fast and clarify.
post #87 of 733
I can say from personal experience I despise center vented coats for a number of reasons. No matter how nice the suit or coat I will not buy unless it is side vented.
post #88 of 733
I prefer side vents, but being a good American, can appreciate the single vent in the Mad Men aesthetic. Who knew there were so many Commies around here?

I have a proper English hacking jacket. It has a single vent. It also smells of hay.

My non-rule rules:
I wear navy socks with everything. I can't remember the last time I wore anything else, save for black tie and sports.

Also, chelseas with everything, including black tie.

The same mid-brown belt with everything.

Knit ties with everything.

No shirt collars other than buttondowns or moderate spreads. Also, I can't remember the last time I wore French cuffs.

I value variety much less than I did in the past.
post #89 of 733
But Doc, you seem to dress in a more rustic fashion so many of your rules are apropos (not sure about navy socks with everything, tho).
post #90 of 733
That's true. I want my suits to look the business but everything else to be casualwear.
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