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Non-Rule "Rules" - Page 44

post #646 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by lestyr3 View Post

 

That goes back to the whole idea behind "satorial rules."  They're shorthand for when people either (a) Have lacking taste in clothing, or (b) Simply haven't had a chance for the trial and error necessary to dress better.  In both cases, we want to save them from an obvious mistake, and there isn't time to explain why it's not a good idea (or we want to end a debate prematurely).  Often the rules are foolish (e.g. "No Brown in Town") but look into why they were first laid out and it makes a little more sense (e.g. I can see a father telling his young son, "Brown shoes require a little bit more thought as far as matching to trousers, so if you're just wearing navy and gray in town to your appointment in an hour just wear black shoes now, we don't have time to discuss the theory").  They're simplifications, and very few simplifications tell the whole truth.   But if you outline the why, there's usually a helpful truth in there
 

I always assumed "no brown in town" referred to brown cloth, not brown leather.

 

i.e. no tweed or otherwise country clothes in the city

post #647 of 772
I think tweed could easily fit city context, and brown and many patterns borrowed from the countryside: but it's important to consider that these patterns/styles must be quite "sober" and not loud. For example, I have a shetland blue odd jacket that I think perfect for weekends, and a azure-blue tweed three piece suit that's fantastic for winter. I knew a gentleman who had the largest and finest wardrobe, and he had many tweed suits. One was lavender, he used to wear it with light blue shirt, and navy waistcoat. True dandy.
post #648 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post

I always assumed "no brown in town" referred to brown cloth, not brown leather.

i.e. no tweed or otherwise country clothes in the city

brown shoes are traditionally country clothes. the "no brown in town" rule has been obsolete for a while now.
post #649 of 772
While I am sure Patrick J. is a nice guy, I am not a fan of almost everything about his look.
post #650 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Interesting...
I met this one guy who uses the same bespoke tailor as myself, super nice guy, ended up talking for a few hours, anyway, he doesn't get any buttons or buttonholes on his jacket sleeves until he has worn them and dry cleaned them over the course of a year in fear that they will be placed and stretch/shrink and such. I don't know if I could leave my house knowing I didn't have any cuff buttons on my jacket sleeves.

Alot of people do something similar to this (Manton I think for one), you can get buttons added to the jacket without any buttonholes or fake buttonholes, not sure why your guy doesn't add the buttons. And it shouldn't take a year, after a few wears the sleeves will settle and you can cut the buttonholes whereever you like. The other option, favored by many of the napoli people, is to cut the buttonholes but leave the last one as a fake one, then you could lengthen the sleeve if need be. I can't be bothered, I get them cut as soon as the jacket is made.
post #651 of 772
I do too, adjustments that have been made to my jackets has never been more than 1/4" which is barely noticeable when adjusted up or down. Plus, shirts all react differently as well. Sleeve length has so many variables. Even bespoke shirts made at the same time from the same patterns have slightly different attributes.
post #652 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
The other option, favored by many of the napoli people, is to cut the buttonholes but leave the last one as a fake one, then you could lengthen the sleeve if need be. I can't be bothered, I get them cut as soon as the jacket is made.

 

Unless I specify to the contrary (which I don't) my Ede jackets come with the top two buttonholes as fakes (and the last two cut), to allow for lengthening. Last one fake sounds like it would be more useful if you intend shortening the sleeve rather than lengthening it, no?

post #653 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

brown shoes are traditionally country clothes. the "no brown in town" rule has been obsolete for a while now.

This is still very much the rule in London, especially in the City. Anyone who wears brown shoes for business is almost inevitably a foreigner.
post #654 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

This is still very much the rule in London, especially in the City. Anyone who wears brown shoes for business is almost inevitably a foreigner.

Yea, I was talking about US sorry. Definitely goes for Italy too though. I have only been to London a couple of times (unfortunately, I love the city, hope to go back more soon) but I remember seeing exclusively black shoes with business suits.
post #655 of 772
Italy? No way. I was under the impression the Italians made brown shoes in the city ok.
post #656 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Italy? No way. I was under the impression the Italians made brown shoes in the city ok.

Sorry I phrased my post poorly - I meant to group US and Italy together as countries for which brown shoes with business suits in town are considered OK, or even preferred.
post #657 of 772
-I always make sure at least one of my tie jacket or shirt is patterned. I will never let all three be solid, though I certainly could if I wished, as I feel this is quite boring (though I do admit Cary Grant could do it well)

-Though I have tried and tried, I can't warm up to loafers. I would much prefer a blucher for a casual ensemble

-If your pants are solid, your socks should always be patterened. Only wear solid socks when you have to. For instance with a smaller patterened suit I find a solid sock usually looks best

-Pink and lavender dress shirts often work better than blue or white

-Successfully wearing a pocket square is much, much harder than one might think. A choice that is good, but not quite right will often detract from an outfit. I find that I go squareless often because of this, and I have 20+ squares.

-Overcoats should not have sleeve buttons

-Linen ties are an abomination. They don't work with linen or fresco suits, they are too casual for worsteds, and there are many superior choices with tweed.
post #658 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by GucciKid View Post

-Linen ties are an abomination.

The GucciKid comes out swingin'!
post #659 of 772

I've thought about this for a while, and these are my personal rules, applicable only to me (*except for this one):

 

- No loafers;

- No 'smart (MC) casual' - if I am not wearing a jacket and tie, it's SW&D all the way;

- Like anything else, socks should be considered as part of the whole ensemble, they do not have to match the trouser*; but

- No 'fun socks' with pictures on them either;

- No polo shirts;

- No ties wider than 3.5";

- No RTW / OTR suits or odd jackets (over the last year, I have learned that with my proportions - short, compact, wide shoulders, in between conventional sizes - RTW / OTR  hardly ever fits me and they will be out in ways that mean that tailoring them to fit is not possible, so I either have to go MTM or bespoke, or hope for the occasional serendipitous quality vintage find);

 

As Marx said, "These are my principles - if you don't like them, I have others."

post #660 of 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by GucciKid View Post

-Linen ties are an abomination. They don't work with linen or fresco suits, they are too casual for worsteds, and there are many superior choices with tweed.

But they do well with cotton odd jackets and suits.

They are a pain to keep though. They get pretty rumpled after they've been knotted.
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