or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Law firm interviews
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Law firm interviews - Page 2

post #16 of 45

I think it would be tough to do all callbacks with one suit.  You're flying / taking trains, doing multiple sets of interviews in the same day or series of days.  Lots of wear for one suit.  If you can keep the suit looking good; avoid soiling it, etc., you should be all right.

 

But unless you can space your callbacks out, which isn't the best option (doing them quickly shows interest / avoids losing your spot to other applicants who beat you to the interview), you probably don't have time to get another suit tailored before your other callbacks. 

 

I would buy a couple of white and blue solid shirts and some sober ties.  Make sure your clothes are pressed for the interview. 

 

Good luck with your callbacks!

post #17 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Why would you want to stand out? BB is perfectly fine. If you want to look at more expensive suits, certainly take a look and see if you like it and if it's worth the extra expense to you, but I don't see why you should want to stand out with your clothes any more than a well-fitting BB suit would allow you to.

 

Why would you want to look like everyone else. You can't make it in America's job market being the average. A BB suit is 1. overpriced and 2. will never fit you as well as a custom or made-to-measure suit.

 

For a job interview you want to look conservative, but still enough to stand out before you even speak. The wardrobe will not get you the job, but a good one will open the mind of the interviewer, from their you can either screw it up or seal the deal.

 

When you already have the job, unless you want to stay where you are, especially at a law firm you want to stand out. Not in an odd way, but in a good way. Which will start with what and how you wear your professional clothing and is followed by your performance. People in the business world (and even yourself subconsciously) react to how you carry yourself, and the clothes your wear. 

 

Don't give anyone the idea that we should be average or settle. It's what has gotten America into the mess we are in now.

 

BB suits other than their essential, which are junk, start at around $1k. Most made-to-measures start at $800. BB top suits are $2k. The same starting price, or even a few hundred more than starting bespoke suits. 

 

I'm not telling him to get diamond pinstripe suits, just to be above the status quo, and spend the same amount of money you would at BB.

post #18 of 45
1) all bespoke suits are not created equal. 2) i'm under the impression that there are other qualities that are important in the job market other than the suit you're wearing. I don't know the law culture that well, but I doubt you want to show up in a $3k suit your first day on the job.
post #19 of 45
Or at least, there is no penalty to showing up in a well fitting $500-1k suit.
post #20 of 45
I agree showing up in a 3k suit would probably not be the best option.
My suggestion is rather than buying a 1k BB suit that will only fit excellently if you are the model they made the suit for get a made-to-measure at $800-1000 suit that will look amazing on you. Even a starting bespoke suit defending on the fabric you pick won't make you stand out to much.

You are absolutely correct their are way more important things than your clothes in the job market. Intelligence, hard work, determination, and people skills are what make you a good worker. But regardless of if you are a good worker, your first impression is not by those things. But are by your body language and what you wear. It's sad but true.

It is also phycological to you. It can keep you on the top of your game when you are dressed well. It's why they tell you when you are eating ready for job interviews to dress up even for a phone interview. Some psychologists suggest you dress up for big tests at school.

To me spending a lot of money when I can get something better got the same price seems like I'm saying: "eh, good enough". Maybe it's just me.
post #21 of 45
BB has a few different models. One of them (or a model from SuitSupply or some other quality RTW maker in the same price range) will probably fit anyone reasonably well. In my experience and from what I've seen on here, MTM in the price range you mention is a real crap shoot. Often it just comes out terrible. Maybe Indochino/MyTailor/whatever tailor you're thinking of at that price or below has improved since the last time I've tried this, but I mostly think it's a bad idea for most people who have neither the time and energy nor tailoring knowledge needed to go through enough iterations and suggestions for alterations necessary to end up with a garment that fits better than RTW in the same price range, much less is made with the same quality materials and construction.
post #22 of 45
A 38r Napoli from SuitSupply fit really well everywhere except the sleeve length, which was too short. Since SS has working button holes, there would have been an obscene amount of gap between the first button and the end of the sleeve. It would have looked strange even with an additional button.

My callbacks are local so I'm not worried about traveling wear/wrinkles. I have enough nice ties and shoes that I think I'll be able to make distinguishable combinations. Now I just have to remember what shirt/tie/shoe combo I wore for each screener.
post #23 of 45
Ah I forgot about the working buttonholes on SS...shame...if it fits you really well everywhere else, maybe you could go MTM with them and just change the sleeve length? Not sure how much extra they charge for minor alterations like that, I don't think it's much.
post #24 of 45
Jbernard, you advise everyone who is just starting to wear suits to start with MTM or bespoke. I don't find this very helpful advice, as noobs are not going to know what to look for or ask for. Unless the noob in question has unique proportions, better to start with RTW. And recommending online MTM, as you do, is a recipe for disaster for someone just starting out.
Edited by KObalto - 8/25/12 at 2:35pm
post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Ah I forgot about the working buttonholes on SS...shame...if it fits you really well everywhere else, maybe you could go MTM with them and just change the sleeve length? Not sure how much extra they charge for minor alterations like that, I don't think it's much.

I think it bumps up from $469 OTR to $600 something for basic MTM. I also tried the 38L and the sleeve length was fine, but the body length felt too long. Also, there is no SS in my secondary market, and I'm not going back to NYC/DC/Chi any time soon.
post #26 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

1) all bespoke suits are not created equal. 2) i'm under the impression that there are other qualities that are important in the job m]arket other than the suit you're wearing. I don't know the law culture that well, but I doubt you want to show up in a $3k suit your first day on the job.[/quote

" I doubt you want to show up in a $3k suit your first day on the job" .[/quote

And if you do, your firm may well assume that in addition to having hired an excellent
attorney, they hired a "rainmaker" as well.
post #27 of 45

Since you are asking what to wear on the interview, I assume you are applying as a first-year associate. In that case, you don't want to/need to show up for work in a 3k suit that costs twice what your boss's does. I agree that you should buy a decent suit and get it tailored so that it fits you well. Brooks Brothers should be fine (as long as it isn't the 348 Outlet line).

post #28 of 45

No suspenders, otherwise good choices. 

post #29 of 45

I work at a big firm.  At first, it surprised me that the way the partners dress is all over the map.  Many of the guys wear OTR Brooks Brothers, while some of the guys fly to London together to get shirts made. One of the managing partners appears to wear department store clothes--colored shirts, no tie, no jacket--and always looks very casual.  

 

We take for granted that our new associates and job candidates will all dress about the same.  Perhaps the single most noteworthy variable is shoe color.  Most 3Ls and first years wear the same pair of black shoes.  When I do see brown shoes, I am very pleased.  It can look very nice.  It's infrequent.  It sets the person apart in a good way.  

 

We also take for granted that the applicants and new people went to well-regarded schools, are at the top of their classes, can write a perfectly bluebooked memo between 7pm and 7 am, and will do predictable work.  In fact, I'd say the work quality of us associates (I am an associate) is fungible.  

 

The thing that sets an applicant or associate apart is personality.  The real asset is an associate who is affable, at ease, likeable, not show-off, comfortable talking to people whom others may perceive as intimidating, and comfortable talking in groups while giving due deference to the group structure and participants.  The trick is to subsume your innate need to be seen as a special individual and instead show an earnest and intelligent commitment to participating in the success of the group.  

 

So, interview in any generic suit, navy or gray.  Don't wear the same shirt/ tie on consecutive visits.  Look at the firm website and mimic the tone of the ties that you see there, but don't stress about it. Don't over-think it.  And try some nice brown shoes if you can. 

post #30 of 45
Just got my suit back from the cleaners, and it looks good. Will wear different shirt/tie/shoe combos from the screeners, and I'll be fine.

FYI, I'm a 2L and referring to callback interviews following on-campus screeners. Secondary market, BigLawl satellite office so far, and waiting on others.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Law firm interviews