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An Interview with William P. Field II of Field English Custom Tailors.

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
No tailor in the DC area is as highly regarded on StyleForum as William Field of Field English Custom Tailors. I was fortunate enough to have him join me for this conversation.



How did you get started in the tailoring business?


I was a student at the University of Maryland, trying to determine what I wanted to do for a major. I was forced to think about my future. So I thought about it, and thought, I've been around my father's business all my life, maybe I could talk to him and see if he'd be willing to teach me as well as run the business, which is two jobs in one. But he seemed to be quite happy about my decision, so I ended up being directed towards fashion merchandising as a major. They didn't have a major for apparel design or anything like that. Here and there a course or two, but there was no major focused on that. At that point, though, I knew I was going to come work for my father full-time anyway. So getting a fashion merchandising degree didn't mean that all that much to me anyway. I learned far more from my father than from my studies. But they wanted me to have a college degree. And I didn't even know it would be a bachelor of science!

What's the English part of Field English Custom Tailors?

Well, my father being from North London, for one. He trained at Savile Row, and I did a stint at Gieves and Hawkes in the workshop, which was nice. And the cut, which is definitely an English cut.

What makes the cut English?

Getting a set shoulder, more of a defined look through the shoulder line, with very little padding. As opposed to a Neapolitan style, with a soft finish and full sleeveheads. Our cut would be more clean and structured, through the chest as well. We hand-pad through the chest to get that natural curve, with a bit of drape right in the armhole, because we want to keep the armhole high, which requires some drape, or you won't be able to move. Which is the difficulty a lot of people are finding with off-the-peg suits from for instance, Rag and Bone, or even J.Crew, which are tight, narrow fitting coats, harking back to the days of the late 50's and early 60's, but they leave no drape whatsoever, so it's very difficult to move in them. So high armhole, but with drape.


A handsome overcoat.

But not so much drape, such as one might find on an Anderson & Sheppard coat?

Yes, that's also because of the shoulder line that they do, similar to Alan Flusser in New York. They have a very extended shoulder line. It's a soft, natural sort of fit but they also tend to do a very high armhole. So with the extension and dropping off, plus the high armhole, you've gotta have drape or the fulcrum wouldn't work. We're not that soft, we have more structure, but not as severe as say, an old-fashioned Huntsman, although they have softened up some over the years. Not too built up, but a nice, set sleeve.


Inside the House of Field

What's your favorite fabric to work with?

Obviously, wool – 100% wool. For a mill, Lesser. The weave, I'd say birdseye. Birdseye performs so well over the years. Occasionally you get little pulls or something, but it's a very long-lasting fabric. It hangs well, doesn't wrinkle too much, and has natural give to it.

DC is one of the most conservatively dressed cities in the world. How can do you inject a bit of English style and flair into a conservative environment?

Well, I don't actively – but if someone comes here, for the most part, they're looking for that English touch. So depending on their age, I may direct them to a nice grey, not a charcoal gray, but a little bit lighter toned. If you're thinking DC, you're pretty much thinking Capitol Hill. And there, it's all dark blue suits. Some dark grey or charcoal, but mostly dark blue. Very dark blue, almost to the point of black, with the obligatory red tie, or light blue tie, and a white shirt, or perhaps an oxford button-down. That's pretty much the uniform. So I'd soften it a bit, because you don't have to be so dark. So maybe a slightly lighter shade of blue. It's still conservative, but it's got some light and richness and texture. You can still do a conservative cut, certainly. But you can have a little splash of color, it's not going to be offensive to anybody.

It depends on who's running the country, too. For instance, when President Reagan came into office, he was a good dresser. He had a very good eye for dressing, and had been working with a particular tailor out in Hollywood for many years. And a lot of his things made for him when he was in the movies. And being from the West Coast, he used more earth tones, not just dark blues and grays. He was willing to wear browns. It still looks very elegant. If you've got the head guy that's having things made and looking very well put together, it filters down. Towards the end of Clinton's presidency, he was wearing suits that were better fitted, and in different colors. When he first came in, he dressed very poorly in ill-fitting suits, but he turned out to be quite a good dresser. The Bushes were very conservative, very J.Press. Obama wears very dark blue suits constantly, which seems very limiting to me.

What's the difference between bespoke and made-to-measure? Why is it so hard for the online sites doing made-to-measure to replicate the fit of true bespoke?

They're not really seeing the person's form. Measuring someone is not just a snapshot. As you're measuring someone, you're asking them about styling, measuring them again, seeing how they move. And at some point in that measuring process, they'll relax a little bit, and then you'll really get to see their form. They're not ramrod straight anymore or sucking in their gut so much, they're relaxed a bit more, and you'll really see the pitch. Maybe they seem down right a half an inch, which is typical, but then they relax and you'll see, it's really three-quarters of an inch. So those computers, like the ones that will do a scan of you, measure you in a static pose, and when you're not very relaxed. Then when you relax, the suit's not going to fit anymore. Then when it gets to the maker, say in China, they'll sort of look at the numbers, and say oh, let's use, say this pattern, a block pattern. Then they finish it up, send it off, and that's it, without any fittings. And they'll probably never see that suit again, because who's going to send it back to China for alterations and deal with all the back and forth?

What are the right things to look for or ask about if you're walking down Savile Row trying to find the right tailor?

On the whole, there are not major differences between one firm to another on the Row. The major differences are if you think of the extremes, like A&S and Huntsman. Everything in between is similar, and within one house, it depends on the cutter. So what it comes down to is the comfort level between the client and the cutter.

What are the things a client should think about before their first commission with a brand new tailor?

I can maybe explain it this way, if I have a new customer, maybe they know what they want, maybe they don't. I'll ask questions and try to figure out what they want, and direct them to what sort of fabric they should to use. Once we've got that figured out, then I'll start by looking at their figure, measuring them, and asking questions about problems they have with off-the-peg garments. I might say, I'll bet this guy has problems with rolls across the collar, or maybe the lapels tend to pop open, or the pockets on the trousers flare open. I'll ask them those questions, and they'll confirm it, and that will help me know that in cutting their suit, I'll have to cut this more square or that more pitched. Usually the customer will know the issues they have with off-the-peg clothes, or will at least be reminded of them when I ask. It helps them feel comfortable, because they know I'm asking all the right questions, which other tailors may not ask. It helps the customer know that I'll go to the utmost length to make sure the suit fits correctly, even if major work has to be done to get there. Bespoke is a big step, and you need confidence in your tailor to do it.


A coat in a beautiful Prince of Wales glen plaid, commissioned by a friend of mine as a part of a 3-piece suit, ready for the first fitting.


A closeup of the fabric.

With the exception of the first photograph of my friend's coat, all photographs taken from Field's facebook page.
post #2 of 30
Nice job.
post #3 of 30
Thanks for this entertaining piece.
post #4 of 30
William is a nice guy. I had a long conversation with him when I had a dinner suit altered and bought three MTM shirts. He has Geneva do the shirts for him, but with his own label.

I asked him about his house style for cutting jackets at the time and he described it as Gieves and Hawkes with the same specifics as above.

He asked who made my suit - I was wearing a Chittleborough & Morgan DB (ebay purchase). He said he doesn't rope the shoulders as much, but cuts with similar English shape to the jacket.

For those looking for a younger tailor to age with them, he's a great option.
post #5 of 30

A nice read - thanks

post #6 of 30
Interesting read, thanks for this and the many interesting threads you've been making recently.
post #7 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks, guys. Mr. Field is indeed a true gentleman. He has a great appreciate for things that are old and handmade. While I was there a customer brought in a 20-year-old Field suit for some alterations, still looked great aside from it having "shrunk" around the midsection.
post #8 of 30
William is a wonderful tailor and a great person. Did he tell you about his days as a singer in a popular DC punk rock band?nod[1].gif
post #9 of 30
Thread Starter 
Yea, we had talked about that before - I play guitar myself. He's a very interesting guy all around.
post #10 of 30

Very useful information. Thank you very much.

post #11 of 30
Nice. Do you know when he was at Gieves?
post #12 of 30
This was a very nice read, and thanks for doing it. I think the most interesting and informative part of it, for me, was this question:

"What are the things a client should think about before their first commission with a brand new tailor?"

And this part of his reply:

"Once we've got that figured out, then I'll start by looking at their figure, measuring them, and asking questions about problems they have with off-the-peg garments. I might say, I'll bet this guy has problems with rolls across the collar, or maybe the lapels tend to pop open, or the pockets on the trousers flare open. I'll ask them those questions, and they'll confirm it, and that will help me know that in cutting their suit, I'll have to cut this more square or that more pitched. "

Again, very cool post.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by NakedYoga View Post

This was a very nice read, and thanks for doing it. I think the most interesting and informative part of it, for me, was this question:
"What are the things a client should think about before their first commission with a brand new tailor?"
And this part of his reply:
"Once we've got that figured out, then I'll start by looking at their figure, measuring them, and asking questions about problems they have with off-the-peg garments. I might say, I'll bet this guy has problems with rolls across the collar, or maybe the lapels tend to pop open, or the pockets on the trousers flare open. I'll ask them those questions, and they'll confirm it, and that will help me know that in cutting their suit, I'll have to cut this more square or that more pitched. "
Again, very cool post.

Theres all kinds of neat little tricks and ways people go about client interactions. I heard a good one recently. One guy doesn't put people in front of mirrors to measure them because people automatically stand differently. I tend to talk about sports, excercise or what the client does for work in an informal way. It sounds like I am just making conversation but the answers give me clues about how to fit this person. A lot of the times though I do it the other way and say something like you play rugby or something like that. when I get that right people are usually rather impressed but you get used to seeing things, I suppose its experience. I also ask them about what brands they like and where they usually shop and this gives the best indicator stylistically.
Edited by David Reeves - 7/22/12 at 9:44am
post #14 of 30
Fantastic interview, thanks for posting. Yes William is a true gentlemen and a great tailor, I wish I could afford something custome from him. I have used him for several suit, trouser and sport coat alterations, mostly B&S, eBay or sale pickups. I even splurged on one of my sport coats, and had William add working buttons on the cuffs, I wouldn't do it on every sport coat, but this one was a great find at a great price, so I splurged.
post #15 of 30
Thread Starter 
Thanks for reading guys - Mr. Field is a true magician with alterations to RTW garments in addition to his bespoke work. Not sure when he was at Gieves though, sorry.
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