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Beasts of Southern Wild - Page 2

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogaboogabooga View Post

Also, just had a thought. In some ways, this film isn't that topically different from Cormac McCarthy's The Road. It just goes 100 MPH the other direction in setting and tone and genre.

The road is a much deeper father-son story for me.

Beasts of the Southern Wild was a story more about culture than about the father-daughter relationship. Some of the scenes between the two were hard to watch, but made less so by the deep connection to culture that was established in the first 10 minutes. I think that was the most powerful element in the movie. The characters had an ability to transform behavior our society deems dysfunctional, into something that is watchable as a cultural experience.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reborn View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by boogaboogabooga View Post

Also, just had a thought. In some ways, this film isn't that topically different from Cormac McCarthy's The Road. It just goes 100 MPH the other direction in setting and tone and genre.

The road is a much deeper father-son story for me.

Beasts of the Southern Wild was a story more about culture than about the father-daughter relationship. Some of the scenes between the two were hard to watch, but made less so by the deep connection to culture that was established in the first 10 minutes. I think that was the most powerful element in the movie. The characters had an ability to transform behavior our society deems dysfunctional, into something that is watchable as a cultural experience.

Just thought I would chime in here as my perspective is a little different. As someone who was living in Nola at the time of Katrina (although I did evacuate), this film struck some familiar chords. To me, it's about facing change when there are no easy outs. Do you give up your life in the community and move on, or do you stick it out and face dire consequences? If your identity is enmeshed in such a unique culture, is it stupid or heroic to stay in the face of those consequences? More importantly, do you return to a devastated city (and surrounding area) when everyone considers it doomed? Centering the film around a child prevents the viewer from ascribing blame, and, for me at least, it allows me to cheer her simple integrity and understand the importance of community in her world. Sometimes tragedy begets triumph. Now that I reflect, I liked this film more than I initially thought.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

THIS. Seems like another patronizing New Yorker take on the Southern magical negro.
But I'll still check it out.

My brother saw it and said it's nothing like this at all. As another poster said, there aren't even any white main characters that need magical negro powers.

Hopefully I get to check it out this weekend.
post #19 of 23
It really wasn't anything like that
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark it 8 View Post

Just thought I would chime in here as my perspective is a little different. As someone who was living in Nola at the time of Katrina (although I did evacuate), this film struck some familiar chords. To me, it's about facing change when there are no easy outs. Do you give up your life in the community and move on, or do you stick it out and face dire consequences? If your identity is enmeshed in such a unique culture, is it stupid or heroic to stay in the face of those consequences? More importantly, do you return to a devastated city (and surrounding area) when everyone considers it doomed? Centering the film around a child prevents the viewer from ascribing blame, and, for me at least, it allows me to cheer her simple integrity and understand the importance of community in her world. Sometimes tragedy begets triumph. Now that I reflect, I liked this film more than I initially thought.

Incredibly well said. I noted some of the things you did but I didn't make the hypothetical leap.
post #21 of 23
Still not in my area =/
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fir3fox View Post

Still not in my area =/

Bummer, dude. Bummer. Save this for your Netflix. Seriously, it this film isn't released on the Criterion Collection upon its initial release (or at least in the next 5 years) I'm going to freak the fuck out. Criterion will get so many angry letters.
post #23 of 23

Short interview on creating the Aurochs:

 

 

lefty 

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