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Am I an alcoholic - Page 4

post #46 of 75
Wow...after reading this thread I am very relieved! I average about 1-2 drinks per day throughout the week..if that (if Im alone) and wondered if it was excessive. But I can put away a half rack like no ones business on the weekend with the right crowd (;
post #47 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkincy
I don't think the answer is how much. If you are even asking that question you likely are being controlled by alcohol, which is the first step in a 12 step program.

A normal drinker will quit drinking with 1/2 glass of wine still in the glass. An abnormal drinker will not only finish the glass but will help his significant other finish his/hers and drinking any amount alone is a rather sure sign of alcohol trouble.

Perry
That's facile and, frankly, absurd. I'm pathologically opposed to waste. I'll almost always finish my glass of wine or spirits, as I will if I'm drinking coffee or lemonade. From time to time I'll finish my wife's if she isn't going to, and on occasion the reverse will happen. We're both abnormal in plenty of ways, but I'm fairly confident that neither of us is "abnormal" (read unhealthy) in our drinking habits.
post #48 of 75
Def an alcoholic by Australian guidelines: Maximum 4 standard drinks a day (A standard drink is any drink containing 10 grams of alcohol --> 100ml wine, 30ml spirits, etc) with two days off a week. Two bottles a day equates to nearly 16 glasss a day. I'd would seek help ASAP if I was you.

http://www.alcohol.gov.au/internet/a...ntent/standard

Guideline 1
To limit health and social risks:

Men should drink no more than 4 standard drinks a day, on average
And never more than 6 standard drinks in one day.

Women should drink no more than 2 standard drinks a day, on average
And never more than 4 standard drinks in one day.

Everyone should have 1 or 2 alcohol-free days every week.
post #49 of 75
Bouji, I actually enjoy your participation on this forum and would hate to ever know harm came to you without at least chiming in. A gym might be a great way to intercept the boredom and revive your serotonin. Also, a good talk therapist once or twice a week might help navigate you through the rough transition away from drinking a lot. Anyway, PM me or anyone you're close to on this forum anytime if you need to talk at a more personal level. There's no reason to suffer alone or feel shame for the less than healthy choices we make. But neither luck nor liver last forever. I think Raymond Carver did his best work once he got off the sauce.
post #50 of 75
Because you have expressed a concern over your consumption of alcohol I urge you to disregard the suggestions that you try a "different" drug.

If, indeed, you have an addictive personality, changing what you consume will not solve your underlying issue.

The quantity you describe drinking nightly is a lot -- a lot of alcohol with a lot of calories. This undoubtedly has a substantial impact on your body and health. The regularity of your consumption also indicates that alcohol may have a major mental impact on you.

For many reasons, it sounds like reducing the amount of alcohol you drink would do you good.

As others have, I encourage you to investigate and take up support in this effort.
post #51 of 75
According to Modern Drunkard (http://www.moderndrunkardmagazine.com), you might be an alcoholic if:

Your friends accuse you of "acting weird" whenever they meet you sober.

Gin is your tonic.

You joined AA because you heard you could get sponsorship for your drinking.

You've stopped drinking, but only when you're asleep.

Your plan to move to New Orleans during hurricane season is based entirely upon the possibility of getting "trapped" in a bar.

You use your cuff links as curb feelers.

Everyone thinks you're bilingual.

You match your outfit to the liquor you plan on drinking.

You resolve to call your local councilman and complain about the city's ill-advised policy of putting lampposts in the middle of the road.

You call an ex-friend at 3am to ask what he meant by that remark last July.

You were genuinely excited about Cingular's "More bars in more places" promise until you found out they were talking about cell phones.

You drank so much beer last night you single-handedly wore out a fresh urinal cake.

The cops set up a DUI checkpoint in your driveway.

Your streetside recycling company has to bring an extra truck.

You'd never steal a fellow drunk's drink, but you do occasionally "adopt orphans."

You only drink socially, except when you're alone.

Interventions have become so frequent that you just leave the folding chairs set up in your living room.

You have a lot of respect for that 80-year-old guy at the end of the bar, but you know from experience that he's a dirty fighter.

You got in a fist fight with a wino over how long a bottle of Thunderbird should be allowed to "breathe".

Your friends often substitute "Good night" with "Hey, you can't sleep here."

Your favorite drinking game is Do A Shot Every Time You Do A Shot.

Your idea of a seven-course meal is a six-pack and a pizza.

When your boss asks you to work overtime you demand time and a fifth.

A liter of scotch isn't enough to invite a friend over for a drink.

Your first science fair project was a still.

You know most the of people in a bar and can't remember one of their names.

You think of drinking beer as "sobering up,"

You enjoy cooking with wine, and sometimes you even put it in the food.

You've been cut off during communion.

You keep a bottle of liquor next to your bed so you can have breakfast in bed when you wake up.

You consider anything less than 80 proof a chaser.

When you come home to find your house burglarized the first thing you check is your liquor cabinet.

You play the same song 20 times in a row at top volume at three in the morning and are certain the neighbors don't mind because, you know, it's such a kick-ass song.

You watch Behind the Music and think "That's really not that much alcohol."

The bartender is in the weeds and you're the only person in the bar.

You get nervous when there are only three bottles of liquor left in your house.

You have never taken a drink of a non-alcoholic beverage without thinking, "Man, a splash of booze would fix this right up."

You dressed as a wino for halloween and no one noticed.

You like to stop for a drink on the way to the fridge to get a beer.

You've asked a bartender to "freshen up" your shot glass.

You occasionally have meals with your wine.

Your favorite bar installed a seat belt on your barstool.

Whenever someone in a suit spills your well bourbon it magically transforms into top shelf scotch on the way to the floor.

You have never screwed a cap back onto a liquor bottle.

You were against going to war with Iraq until you found out those poor fuckers aren't allowed to drink.

You like a splash of coffee in your morning whiskey.

You prefer cold showers because the ice in your drink doesn't melt as fast.

You're definition of a problem drinker is guy who won't buy you a round.

You refer to your mouth as your "booze hole."

Absolut wants to run an ad featuring a picture of your liver in the shape of a bottle.

You only drink to get rid of hangovers, and sometimes it takes all night.

You get so drunk Bud Light starts tasting like beer.

You think vomiting is the body's way of making room for the next round.
post #52 of 75
I've known enough alcoholics. The wisest ones have gone through AA and are still practicing its program. They will admit that even though they haven't had a drink for over 20 years, they are still an alcoholic (addictive personality probably a better term). And, I am sincerely sorry for your loss, Bouji. See a therapist. If you live in SD county, I know a terrific one. However, any therapist worth their fee will also urge you to go to AA concurrently with therapy. I may not agree with some of AA's beliefs but they remain the most effective at dealing with addiction problems.
post #53 of 75
Motivation is the key in drug and alcohol tx. Many clinicians will ask you to attend AA both for the supportive aspect of interacting with other alcoholics and to gauge both your willingness to change and your motivation to do so. I can't imagine what the experience of losing your wife has been like. The fact that you made this post answers your initial inquiry. If someone is concerned that they are drinking too much, most likely they are. Alcohol is also a central nervous system depressant which will only worsen any depression or anxiety you are experiencing. You really need to speak with someone to learn some more adaptive coping skills.

Have you ever tried to curtail your drinking? If so did you have any withdrawal symptoms? (DT's, agitation, severe cravings, etc)? As much as I would urge you to seek psychological treatment, you need to go see a doc first. Any competent clinician is going to require you to do so before they begin working with you anyway. With the amounts that you're drinking, you need to be assessed as a candidate for medical detox.

MrR
post #54 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
That's facile and, frankly, absurd. I'm pathologically opposed to waste. I'll almost always finish my glass of wine or spirits, as I will if I'm drinking coffee or lemonade. From time to time I'll finish my wife's if she isn't going to, and on occasion the reverse will happen. We're both abnormal in plenty of ways, but I'm fairly confident that neither of us is "abnormal" (read unhealthy) in our drinking habits.

Goddamn drunk.



post #55 of 75
Can't add much to what's already been heard; the fact that you're even asking the question is a good sign. And I'm very sorry to hear of your loss, too.

Given that, this may seem insensitive to ask, but haven't you gained a huge amount of weight? How could you not, drinking this volume regularly?
post #56 of 75
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the condolences.

Last night I drank 3 glasses of wine
This evening, it is midnight, and I am on my second glass, I intend to sleep within two hours, So possibly this will be my last glass.

I've put on a little visible weight on my cheeks, but I am only 1kg heavier than I was 6 months ago, when I used to drink maybe half a bottle of spirits on a Friday and Saturday night, and not drink in the week.
post #57 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
Last night I drank 3 glasses of wine
This evening, it is midnight, and I am on my second glass, I intend to sleep within two hours, So possibly this will be my last glass.

That's great, but consider a real holiday from booze-- of a few weeks, anyway.

And do see a shrink. It's the right thing to do. You've been through a lot and should get yourself looked at by someone who cares how you're doing.
post #58 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
Not only job stress, but also the fact my wife died about a year ago.


My heart truly goes out to you and my "Soul Craves for your independence"

Love you Brother, From another sufferring "soul"...

"We're just Two Lost Souls swimming in a Fishbole, Year after Year"...

Things will be alright for both of us...
post #59 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouji
Thanks to all for the condolences.

Last night I drank 3 glasses of wine
This evening, it is midnight, and I am on my second glass, I intend to sleep within two hours, So possibly this will be my last glass.

I've put on a little visible weight on my cheeks, but I am only 1kg heavier than I was 6 months ago, when I used to drink maybe half a bottle of spirits on a Friday and Saturday night, and not drink in the week.


That's a great start and its nice to hear that you've only been having trouble for a short amount of time <6 months. If you can take advice from a bunch of anonymous fashion geeks over the internet, think how informative a real psychiatrist would be. Good luck on your road to health.
post #60 of 75
It's hard to add anything constructive to all of the above except to say that the regularity and quantity of alcohol consumed DEFINITELY signifies alcoholism and while being aware is a start, taking action is the hard part.

My sincerest regrets on your loss. Losing people you love is the hardest part of life. Unfortunately it is part of life for all of us and as time goes on and we all get older, it happens more frequently. When you find a "life partner" and lose her (or him) it is a struggle to just get out of bed in the morning. It is a struggle to shower, to get dressed, to do the most mundane things, to do what seemed so easy to do before. It is hard to get on with your life.

I say all of this from experience. It is a conscious decision to FORCE yourself to move on. It gets easier. At first it just begins to feel "different" as the pain and anger and cynicism begin to fade, very slowly at first. Eventually though, it's almost like the person you lost was not real, like she was just a character in some chapter in the book that is "Your Life". And so the pain is gone and the grieving is over and you can reminisce (mostly about the good times, especially the innocence of when you were just getting to know each other).

So I guess what I'm trying to say is that I can empathize with loss but alcohol and/or drugs only deny the grieving (or any other emotional) process. It is a CONSCIOUS decision to make. Do I want to move on with my life? or do I want to stagnate and die or at the very least be a slave to some crutch (alcohol/drugs) for the rest of my life? Time is the healer of all wounds and losing a spouse can take years to recover. Don't deny yourself the ability to heal. You are worth it and things do get "better". My sincerest best wishes for you. Scott
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