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On pattern coordination between jacket/shirt/tie....................... - Page 3

post #31 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

When I wear an odd jacket, these days the tie is always a repp or knit. I never wear a printed or woven pattern....
If I want to try other than solid grenadine, any other suggested pattern if I want to rule out repp or knit? Thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

...I'll gladly post pics of my daily outfits which consists of a patterned or solid sportcoat, solid blue shirt and navy tie...
Ed, if you can please...for a better comparison for the purpose of this thread/discussion...Thanks



...btw, the 2 outfits of Vox/Mr Corbera are among my favorite/top 5 from his vast collection...
post #32 of 434
^^

UBR:

i like this fit much better. It's boring, but the right kind of boring. I like the shirt, at any rate, regardless of how it's being worn. Who made it?
post #33 of 434
Ties for odd jackets should be casual. I don't like macclesfield or businessy or (worst of all) very formal wedding ties with odd jackets, the only exception would be a blazer and grays.

At the upper end of the formality scale would be an ancient madder. I tend not to wear my other Cappelli/Marinella foulards. Wovens, never. If it's spring summer, linen or linen blends are good, if winter, wool or cashmere.

But still my default with any jacket is always a knit.
post #34 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Ties for odd jackets should be casual. I don't like macclesfield or businessy or (worst of all) very formal wedding ties with odd jackets, the only exception would be a blazer and grays.
At the upper end of the formality scale would be an ancient madder. I tend not to wear my other Cappelli/Marinella foulards. Wovens, never. If it's spring summer, linen or linen blends are good, if winter, wool or cashmere.
But still my default with any jacket is always a knit.

Where would you place tie fabrics like Irish poplin and mogador in this spectrum?
post #35 of 434
Those are OK.
post #36 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post

^^
UBR:
i like this fit much better. It's boring, but the right kind of boring. I like the shirt, at any rate, regardless of how it's being worn. Who made it?

Really, you think that outfit is boring? I'm not saying the fit is good or bad, but the last thing I'd call it is boring, although it may be more boring than the other fit with the champagne-colored tie. I don't think it's possible to make that suit into a boring outfit, the fabric is pretty unique.

Anyway, thanks, I like the shirt too - it's Giorgio Armani, from a few years ago. I've been looking in fabric books for something similar to have made up into shirts but haven't been able to find the right fabric. It will make me sad when that shirt dies, which may be soon as it has seen a lot of wear.
post #37 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Those are OK.

They've been recurring staples of my summer wardrobe recently, especially during outdoor wedding and party season. I realize they're becoming kind of trendy these days, though, so the frequency with which I wear them may start to correlate inversely with their appearance in the pages of, say, Details.
post #38 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Ties for odd jackets should be casual. I don't like macclesfield or businessy or (worst of all) very formal wedding ties with odd jackets, the only exception would be a blazer and grays.
At the upper end of the formality scale would be an ancient madder. I tend not to wear my other Cappelli/Marinella foulards. Wovens, never. If it's spring summer, linen or linen blends are good, if winter, wool or cashmere.
But still my default with any jacket is always a knit.

Do you consider tie construction in such a decision? Somehow unlined/untipped ties seem more casual to me than their more constructed cousins. Whether an observer could even discern the difference I don't know, but to me as the wearer it feels more right.
post #39 of 434
I think the construction of the tie may make it marginally more casual but the effect is so small it doesn't matter. A lined, tipped repp is still great for an odd jacekt where as unlined, untipped B&W woven houdstooth is terrible.
post #40 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Do you consider tie construction in such a decision? Somehow unlined/untipped ties seem more casual to me than their more constructed cousins. Whether an observer could even discern the difference I don't know, but to me as the wearer it feels more right.

I don't know if untipped and/or unlined is inherently casual, so much as it's inherently insouciant. It's part of a particular aesthetic, be it American "trad" or Neopolitan business. One can be conservatively dressed in a light Italian suit, handmade Italian shirt, and unlined Italian tie. The look will stand out in most American workplaces, though, and probably will connote to being somehow, indescribably more casual in the eyes of an uninitiated observer. But few would probably call it unacceptably casual.

We should keep in mind that, in the modern American experience, unique or unfamiliar subtly connote to "casual," but this is not the same thing as a true casual distinction.
post #41 of 434
Ed, the combinations you show are generally too busy and low on scale variance. I stay away from small and dot patterned ties when wearing tweed, as most tweed has a combination of texture and pattern that would be too close in scale and/or density.
post #42 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post

I don't know if untipped and/or unlined is inherently casual, so much as it's inherently insouciant. It's part of a particular aesthetic, be it American "trad" or Neopolitan business. One can be conservatively dressed in a light Italian suit, handmade Italian shirt, and unlined Italian tie. The look will stand out in most American workplaces, though, and probably will connote to being somehow, indescribably more casual in the eyes of an uninitiated observer. But few would probably call it unacceptably casual.

I don't mean unacceptably casual. I'm not talking about what's socially appropriate. I think even Manton will admit that no one should be offended if you wear a silk print with an odd jacket. But that particular aesthetic is more loose and casual than the Huntsman-style, cleanly tailored silhouette. Maybe one way to ask the question is, do you think it would be weird to wear an unlined tie with a Huntsman suit?
post #43 of 434
How would anyone know if your tie is unlined or not?
post #44 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

I don't mean unacceptably casual. I'm not talking about what's socially appropriate. I think even Manton will admit that no one should be offended if you wear a silk print with an odd jacket. But that particular aesthetic is more loose and casual than the Huntsman-style, cleanly tailored silhouette. Maybe one way to ask the question is, do you think it would be weird to wear an unlined tie with a Huntsman suit?

I own several highly constructed Huntsman suits, and I would not pair them with unstructured ties. I don't think such a pairing would be weird, per se, but I don't like to clash British and Continental looks as a personal rule.

Wiser minds than mine (Manton, Vox, Foo, et al.) may disagree.
post #45 of 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

How would anyone know if your tie is unlined or not?
Maybe because it's lighter it flaps around more. Also, the knot is smaller.

Untipped you can see if the tie flips around, which it might if it is super light because of the lack of lining.

But, yeah, this is so marginal it zero effect on what we're talking about.
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