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BMW slayer from GM - Page 5

post #61 of 69
SGlad, we simply disagree though I think perhaps you need to recheck some of your statements. Quement's design career has extended back to the 60's and you also lose credibility by attacking Bangle's lack of aesthetic congruity. I also don't know what you're aiming at by bringing up iDrive into the conversation. His interior direction is quite minimal, rest assured. "Chris Bangle takes a styling approach, slashing into his designs' sheetmetal with the CAD equivalent of a machete and calling it art." As a matter of fact, Bangle himself is quite the traditionalist and in some cases prefers using manual tape drawings. Anyhow, I don't see how any of this is relevant. You must swoon easily.
post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dormouse
I also don't know what you're aiming at by bringing up iDrive into the conversation. His interior direction is quite minimal, rest assured.

My understanding is that a chief of design is responsible for, well, design. Presumably that extends to the interior of a car as well. And to me it is indisputable that BMW interior design as nosedived under his watch, though to be fair the first modern BMW with a really crappy interior was the Z3, which may have been before his time.

Quote:
"Chris Bangle takes a styling approach, slashing into his designs' sheetmetal with the CAD equivalent of a machete and calling it art." As a matter of fact, Bangle himself is quite the traditionalist and in some cases prefers using manual tape drawings.

Virtual machete, actual machete, it doesn't make much difference. The end result sucks.
post #63 of 69
SG: I still have no idea what you mean by "speak." What I do know is I drove home today feeling ever so safe and totally in control of my Beemer. I have never had that feeling to such an extent in any other car I've owned. The acceleration helps me avoid problems as much as the braking. The steering/handling also a big help. I take corners much faster than other cars and the BMW never strains while cornering. Again, I feel totally in control. The car has always done as I wanted and never does something different (e.g. to swerve and avoid another car, it simply makes the maneuver and is ready for more; in fact, it almost reacts as if it was too easy of a maneuver). At 80 mph, the car is totally ready for anything. That feeling of security is worth a lot to me. I absolutely love BMWs. Have since about 1971.
post #64 of 69
You will never get him to believe that the current BMWs are a driver's machine or any other current car for that matter so it is pointless to try. My boss at my old job was the same way. He drove a Mini Cooper and only admired the Miata in the current crop of cars. He would endlessly go on about how he wish he had his 1960's Porsche roadster because of how "connected" he felt to the road and how he could judge everything by the vibrations and feeling he would get from the road, how the car was slow but it was raw and more fun to drive than anything he's driven since. There is a crop of people who abhor technology in automobiles and feel that adding technology to an automobile just creates a disconnect with the driver and adds weight to a vehicle creating a less balanced platform that you can't throw around as easy regardless of stats. They long for the days when cars where simple machines and typically choose small roadsters as they are the closest you can get to these cars in the modern era. I see technology as helping automobiles rather than hurting them. Cars have become safer, more comfortable, more interactive, and have given us a whole host of driving dynamics and this is just the beginning.
post #65 of 69
It's not that I would never buy an American car (though I never have thus far). But this one sure isn't the one to make me do it.
post #66 of 69
The design of this car is entirely derivative. There is absolutely nothing original about it. Furthermore, it's derivations are tepid and uninspired.

Regardless of performance, the styling of this sedan (both inside and out) produces none off the stimulating emotional responses a new performance car should.

Shame on GM. Another opportunity squandered.
post #67 of 69
Quote:
Quote:
Virtual machete, actual machete, it doesn't make much difference. The end result sucks.

Wherein lies your fault. Your own aesthetic sensibilites dominate your ideas of good design. Funny how your idolized Quement praises Bangle. My personal take is that Bangle's cars are conceptually beautiful yet they seem to lack the final touch of refinement. A problem in homogeny. Modern automotive culture tends toward product design which I disagree with while Bangle is influenced by futurism and architecture and sees car design in a much more sophisticated sense.
post #68 of 69
Well this has turned out to be an interesting thread.

People, please stop your bitching. Each car has its purpose and the people who like it, it doesn't mean that another car is completely inferior and should be eliminated because someone doesn't like it or how ugly/shitty/stupid/cheap/etc it looks.

Let's grow up and respect the opinions of others. It's not that hard.

JB
post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asterix
BMW Slayer?

Why the Americans like to build such ugly cars ?

GM would have to pay me big $$ to make me change my BMW 320i for that thing...
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