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Black shoes for a baby lawyer - Page 6

post #76 of 90
I have a pair of C&J Audley that are my go-to business shoe. Love em. I have 2 pair AE in the back of my spare closet somewhere.
post #77 of 90
Thread Starter 
Are you a lawyer that makes shoes, or a lawyer that has a business that makes shoes, or doc you just do business?

I've often thought of business ventures, but don't want to leave lawyering.
post #78 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

Are you a lawyer that makes shoes, or a lawyer that has a business that makes shoes, or doc you just do business?
I've often thought of business ventures, but don't want to leave lawyering.

 

He's a lawyer who specializes in claims against shoe manufacturers.  Not much profit in it yet, but it's a growing field. 

post #79 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

Are you a lawyer that makes shoes, or a lawyer that has a business that makes shoes, or doc you just do business?
I've often thought of business ventures, but don't want to leave lawyering.

"Don't want to leave lawyering"?

Does not compute.
post #80 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post

 

He's a lawyer who specializes in claims against shoe manufacturers.  Not much profit in it yet, but it's a growing field. 

sounds like a rather niche business, however, i can see lots of SF clients

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xenos View Post


"Don't want to leave lawyering"?
Does not compute.

I want to operate a business. I do not want to give up lawyering (i.e., I want clients, office, court, etc).

 

I'm just wondering how/if AngelIcboris has a shoe biz + law practice (wasn't responding to your post, but now I see that my post was immediately after your post. I was on my phone and suck at see whole pages on my phone).

post #81 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post

 

Once you've practiced for a few years, no one cares where you went to lawschool.

 

 

Law school tuition fees have risen a LOT over the past 10 years.

I have a distant relative that graduated in the early-mid 2000s and told me that tuition and fees (not counting his scholarship/merit based aid) came out to around 10k.  At the same school this year the tuition is 38k in-state and 45k out-of-state.

This is a difference of ~90k in loans over the course of three years.

 
As someone thinking of my future as an attorney, I find it difficult to be swayed by such comforting words.

Sure my degree won't matter when my hairline has started to recede but what about the few years that you spend trying hard and still not being able to make ends meet with essentially a house mortgage to pay in the form of student loans, and no house to show for it.

post #82 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breedlove View Post

 

 

Law school tuition fees have risen a LOT over the past 10 years.

I have a distant relative that graduated in the early-mid 2000s and told me that tuition and fees (not counting his scholarship/merit based aid) came out to around 10k.  At the same school this year the tuition is 38k in-state and 45k out-of-state.

This is a difference of ~90k in loans over the course of three years.

 
As someone thinking of my future as an attorney, I find it difficult to be swayed by such comforting words.

Sure my degree won't matter when my hairline has started to recede but what about the few years that you spend trying hard and still not being able to make ends meet with essentially a house mortgage to pay in the form of student loans, and no house to show for it.

If you keep thinking about the money, I can guarantee that you will not succeed.  In fact, you are in the wrong industry.

 

Find out what you like doing (in terms of being in service to others), do it extremely well, and the money will be an afterthought.  The field of law is so wide, and somehow, I get the impression that you still do not know what you want other than saying you want to be an attorney (not a put-down, this is actually pretty normal).

post #83 of 90
Thread Starter 

I was surprised at the number of students my 1L year that were in law school to have a law degree, but that's as far as they thought anything through. I'm in it to make a decent living, but also because I love it. If I didn't love all this crap, I wouldn't have spent all the time and money to do something I don't want to do.

post #84 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

If you keep thinking about the money, I can guarantee that you will not succeed.  In fact, you are in the wrong industry.

 

Find out what you like doing (in terms of being in service to others), do it extremely well, and the money will be an afterthought.  The field of law is so wide, and somehow, I get the impression that you still do not know what you want other than saying you want to be an attorney (not a put-down, this is actually pretty normal).

I still don't see whats wrong with gunning for a higher LSAT for better options regarding schools and post-graduation.

I've done my research and have come to terms how long it would take to repay $100k in loans.

If I told you I wanted to do public interest work for non-profit orgs, would it then, make sense to you why I want to lower my debt as much as possible while getting into a school with better LRAPs (essentially the better T1 schools)?

 

The same concerns apply to any other prospective lawyer, regardless of career goals, who has spent a decent amount of time researching the legal market or has spent time in the legal field.

With $100k+ in loans, big law is the only option that would allow for a comfortable standard of living while being able to repay loans in a timely fashion.  Big law is not for me and even if it was my only option, chances are, unless I'm not in the top 10% of my class wherever I go, I won't be able to land a big law position.

post #85 of 90

Practice and law school are worlds apart.  Get some job experience, even if you have to volunteer with no pay, to get an insight on actual law practice.  You may or may not like actual practice, and it always helps to know what you do not like, to get to what you actually like.

 

To me, the most important link between the world of law and the world of sartoria is attention to detail, but being able to see the bigger picture.  So please ditch the AEs and go for Meermins :-)

post #86 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breedlove View Post

I still don't see whats wrong with gunning for a higher LSAT for better options regarding schools and post-graduation.

I've done my research and have come to terms how long it would take to repay $100k in loans.

If I told you I wanted to do public interest work for non-profit orgs, would it then, make sense to you why I want to lower my debt as much as possible while getting into a school with better LRAPs (essentially the better T1 schools)?

 

The same concerns apply to any other prospective lawyer, regardless of career goals, who has spent a decent amount of time researching the legal market or has spent time in the legal field.

With $100k+ in loans, big law is the only option that would allow for a comfortable standard of living while being able to repay loans in a timely fashion.  Big law is not for me and even if it was my only option, chances are, unless I'm not in the top 10% of my class wherever I go, I won't be able to land a big law position.

Laser-like focus, diligence and passion beat having many many options, each time, every time, and in nearly every field of endeavour that I have read about or experienced.

 

You want:

 

1. Better options with good LSAT;

2. Comfortable standard of living;

3. Repayment of loans in timely fashion;

4. No big law;

5. Low paying public interest work.

 

Sounds to me like you are all over the place- no offense intended, just 2 decades of experience in business and law.

 

Sun Tzu- "Know yourself, know your enemy, hundred battles hundred won."

 

Just consider it carefully, and good luck.

post #87 of 90
Thread Starter 

Big debt doesnt necessarily require big law. That said, you must be frugal, network, and prove yourself "in the field".

post #88 of 90
I never finished law school. I realized that it is important to drop out of something in order to make a Forbes list one day.
post #89 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

Laser-like focus, diligence and passion beat having many many options, each time, every time, and in nearly every field of endeavour that I have read about or experienced.

 

You want:

 

1. Better options with good LSAT;

2. Comfortable standard of living;

3. Repayment of loans in timely fashion;

4. No big law;

5. Low paying public interest work.

 

Sounds to me like you are all over the place- no offense intended, just 2 decades of experience in business and law.

 

Sun Tzu- "Know yourself, know your enemy, hundred battles hundred won."

 

Just consider it carefully, and good luck.

You break my interests down to five categories all of which are linked together.

Low paying public interest work means I automatically have to rule out scoring low on the LSAT and getting small scholarships to lesser schools as there's no way I can afford to do the work I want to do without significant financial assistance.  At the same time, getting into a better school (many of which have better LRAPs) means I'll have an easier time paying off my loans.

Also, public interest is a goal that is as far away from big law as I can think of as a practicing attorney.

And lastly, a comfortable standard of living will depend on whether or not I have massive loans looming in my face when I walk down the aisle to pick up my JD.

 

But nonetheless I do agree with you in that laser-like focus will get me farther in life and as such, have been considering pros and cons of pursuing a JD (and likewise, the same reason I decided to turn down all my offers this year).

post #90 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Breedlove View Post

I still don't see whats wrong with gunning for a higher LSAT for better options regarding schools and post-graduation.
I've done my research and have come to terms how long it would take to repay $100k in loans.
If I told you I wanted to do public interest work for non-profit orgs, would it then, make sense to you why I want to lower my debt as much as possible while getting into a school with better LRAPs (essentially the better T1 schools)?

The same concerns apply to any other prospective lawyer, regardless of career goals, who has spent a decent amount of time researching the legal market or has spent time in the legal field.
With $100k+ in loans, big law is the only option that would allow for a comfortable standard of living while being able to repay loans in a timely fashion.  Big law is not for me and even if it was my only option, chances are, unless I'm not in the top 10% of my class wherever I go, I won't be able to land a big law position.

Friends from the US tell me that if you work in the public service, the govt writes off the loan after a certain amount of time don't they?
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