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Critics hate RL's US Olympic Team Uniforms - Page 6

post #76 of 152
$600? There are place in Europe paying €200.
post #77 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post


How can you compete with people paid less than 600 hundreds dollars a month?
They always be a lot cheaper than your own workforce..

It's not the labor per se, it's the import tariffs and taxes that drive up the cost of doing business overseas. Obviously it's still cheaper than doing business here BUT with proper US tax protocols, and responsible union behavior, domestic labor is cheap enough that we can compete on the global stage. By compete, I mean make it worthwhile for companies to manufacture products here.  

 

There are plenty of people willing to work for lower wages here, its the government, tax code(s) and unions that are effing everything up.

post #78 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by lasbar View Post

How can you compete with people paid less than 600 hundreds dollars a month?
They always be a lot cheaper than your own workforce..

$600 is way overstating what they make- knock a zero off and you'll be in the ballpark.

Even if you got rid of all labor laws and taxes, it would still be cheaper to make stuff in China, since the cost of living is cheaper there and people can work for less. And I don't think we need to be aiming to bring back a world Upton Sinclair would recognize. If you do, then I might be inclined to call you a godless piece of human filth.
post #79 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post

$600? There are place in Europe paying €200.

200 is more on the mark than 600..

Sorry.
post #80 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post


There are plenty of people willing to work for lower wages here,

I'm guessing you have no idea of what lower wages would really be.
post #81 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post


I'm guessing you have no idea of what lower wages would really be.

I do.  The cost of doing business overseas is driven up by the tariffs and taxes, plus logistics and shipping. Not actual labor, which is dirt cheap. My point is that we could compete on the global stage because said secondary factors, if the US got serious about domestic tax breaks, unions stopped acting irrational and we created some damn jobs.

post #82 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


$600 is way overstating what they make- knock a zero off and you'll be in the ballpark.
Even if you got rid of all labor laws and taxes, it would still be cheaper to make stuff in China, since the cost of living is cheaper there and people can work for less. And I don't think we need to be aiming to bring back a world Upton Sinclair would recognize. If you do, then I might be inclined to call you a godless piece of human filth.

It's not about about the labor overall -- it's about the taxes, tarifs logistics and shipping costs that a company incurs abroad -- that is why we would be able to compete (if the unions relaxed and the US got serious about providing tax benefits to big producers).

post #83 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post

It's not the labor it's the import tariffs and taxes that drive up the cost of doing business overseas. Obviously it's still cheaper than doing business here BUT with proper US tax protocols, and responsible union behavior  labor is cheap enough that we can compete on the global stage. By compete, i mean make it worthwhile for companies to manufacture products here.  

Wrong. Utterly wrong. The US, and other industrialized nations, cannot compete for unskilled labor. We can compete where precision is important, or when you want close control of your product line. Any unskilled labor jobs are as ancillary parts to production that requires skill at some other point- building a housing for a delicate instrument, for example. You could build the housing in china, the instrument here and combine them, but if you already have a facility here, the flexibility of your product line being local is valuable enough that you pay the increased labor cost- you you need to redesign that housing, you get the new ones built in two days rather than two weeks, for example.

Skilled manufacturing we can compete on, but in that area, we aren't competing on price so much as the quality of work.

Making jeans is not skilled labor, and it's never coming back to the US, even if we gut labor and environmental protections. Hate to break it to you, but that's a pipe dream.
post #84 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


Wrong. Utterly wrong. The US, and other industrialized nations, cannot compete for unskilled labor. We can compete where precision is important, or when you want close control of your product line. Any unskilled labor jobs are as ancillary parts to production that requires skill at some other point- building a housing for a delicate instrument, for example. You could build the housing in china, the instrument here and combine them, but if you already have a facility here, the flexibility of your product line being local is valuable enough that you pay the increased labor cost- you you need to redesign that housing, you get the new ones built in two days rather than two weeks, for example.
Skilled manufacturing we can compete on, but in that area, we aren't competing on price so much as the quality of work.
Making jeans is not skilled labor, and it's never coming back to the US, even if we gut labor and environmental protections. Hate to break it to you, but that's a pipe dream.

Making luxury garments is not a skilled activity?  I'm referring to "high end" suiting, I thought that is what we were discussing. 

post #85 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post

It's not about the labor -- it's about the taxes, tarifs logistics and shipping costs that a company incurs abroad -- that is how would are able to compere (if the unions relaxed and the US got serious about providing tax benefits to big producers).

It's really not. Despite what Rush Limbaugh screams at you, the US is low to middle of the road when it comes to effective tax burdens. Yes, our marginal rates are high, but there are so many loopholes and tax shelters available that nobody large enough to afford a tax lawyer or two pays it. There's not a whole lot of unionization left in the US, you're screaming at a boogieman.

Tariffs? We don't have much in the way of tariffs. Yeah, we could up them dramatically, but then other countries up theirs, and all of a sudden, GM can't export, and Airbus takes over the Asian markets Boeing has been so carefully cultivating.

Unskilled manufacturing will never come back to the US. Face it and move on.
post #86 of 152
Ralph Lauren made a strategic mistake which has cost him some goodwill, and the shame of it is that they squandered a crapload of potential to capitalize on a trend that has passed the early adopter stage and into the mainstream. There are some very well known mid-tier American manufacturers who could have made the uniforms that Ralph designed. Southwick comes immediately to mind. "Ralph Lauren works with American manufacturers to make the US Olympic Uniforms" would have been a very compelling storyline. I know that RL does not have the same marketing strategy as J.Crew, but there's not shame to taking a page from a competitor's playbook, especially when you have such a unique opportunity.
post #87 of 152
I had the same conversation with an English colleague...

Are people ready to pay goods produced in the UK after being used to Cheap goods?

The answer is no...

We can be uber capitalists believing in open trade agreement and suddenly wanting to change the rules of the game to protect our own interests...

I believe we have a duty to protect our skill base and industries but I do also believe in a certain dose of protectionism because I'm also a social-democrat..

We have a duty to take care of our own workers whilst spreading our wealth to other countries ..

A difficult act to balance as people are readily ready to sacrifice others to enjoy/protect their own standard of living..
post #88 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


It's really not. Despite what Rush Limbaugh screams at you, the US is low to middle of the road when it comes to effective tax burdens. Yes, our marginal rates are high, but there are so many loopholes and tax shelters available that nobody large enough to afford a tax lawyer or two pays it. There's not a whole lot of unionization left in the US, you're screaming at a boogieman.
Tariffs? We don't have much in the way of tariffs. Yeah, we could up them dramatically, but then other countries up theirs, and all of a sudden, GM can't export, and Airbus takes over the Asian markets Boeing has been so carefully cultivating.
Unskilled manufacturing will never come back to the US. Face it and move on.

Rush Limbaugh?

I would consider luxury clothing manufacture to be a skilled labor. 

post #89 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Ralph Lauren made a strategic mistake which has cost him some goodwill, and the shame of it is that they squandered a crapload of potential to capitalize on a trend that has passed the early adopter stage and into the mainstream. There are some very well known mid-tier American manufacturers who could have made the uniforms that Ralph designed. Southwick comes immediately to mind. "Ralph Lauren works with American manufacturers to make the US Olympic Uniforms" would have been a very compelling storyline. I know that RL does not have the same marketing strategy as J.Crew, but there's not shame to taking a page from a competitor's playbook, especially when you have such a unique opportunity.

Absolutely.

post #90 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie22 View Post

Making luxury garments is not a skilled activity?  I'm referring to "high end" suiting, I thought that is what we were discussing. 

You were attacking strawmen. I don't know what we were discussing.
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