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Critics hate RL's US Olympic Team Uniforms - Page 10

post #136 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott anderson View Post

I have been silent on this matter as I have wanted to read, listen and research the elements of this situation.
Allow me to clarify and simplify this matter with a practical answer devoid of politics, emotion or opinion in the first part. In the second part I will offer my opinion.
PART I
The uniforms in question are essentially Blue Blazers, a matter in which I have obvious personal expertise. A lot of 350 of these takes from delivery of fabric to availability for delivery 6 to 8 weeks total at our factory located in Florida. Fabric delivery takes 10 days for in-stock dyed and 30 days for custom dyed "grey goods".
Had I been asked, I would have been happy to make the garments for the team at my factory replete with the Polo branding and done it at wholesale as a courtesy to our team and to Mr. Lauren for whom I have the utmost respect. I would have used Lauren patterns, fabrics and all other specifications. i also would have signed a confidentiality agreement to avoid any encroachment of the Anderson-Little brand into Lauren's licensing deal with the Olympics. Further my Father would have consulted directly with Mr. Lauren to make sure he felt supported by someone with decades of experience.
Also, be aware that these athletes can be very, very tall, or very, very short or very muscular or bulky or very thin, so in essence you are running from 54 XL to 34 Short and everywhere in between and probably only a few in each size, so it's almost a custom order for the top and bottom end of the size scale. And you have both men's and women's.
All that being said, I can state for a fact that It would absolutely not have been more expensive to make this garment here. I do it every day.
They just never asked. They used their usual channels and this is based around a foreign production model. It's just that simple. Just business as usual.
PART II
My opinion:
Given the lead time involved in this and their overall business model, coupled with the foreign manufacture of the uniforms for many years, I doubt the issue ever even came up as to where to make them. They're at the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong product. They misjudged the mood of the nation, underestimated the public reaction and failed to anticipate the public relations lightening rod this would become.
While I hate to see a class act like Lauren be dragged over hot coals for simply running his business, I do applaud the American public for finally getting the real message here. We have got to make things if we are ever going to bring growth and prosperity back to our economy. We need to return our national focus to manufacturing and reclaim our place in the word market with goods made here. A service economy will never provide growth or prosperity. That can only come from the creation of wealth through the production of goods. The service economy is a theory and it has not worked.
The problem is we have been told for so long that we can't do it, we, like Lauren don't even bother asking the question. Should we make it here?
That is why I took Anderson-Little back. That is why I make my product here. That is why my company has grown a minimum of 20% per year in the four years since my Father and I relaunched it.
We bothered to ask the question. Can we make it here and really compete. The answer was a resounding yes. And we were absolutely right.
Let me repeat. I opened a textile company in the middle of the worst recession since the Great Depression. TEXTILES. I make my garments here in America. My company is a success and has double digit growth and the economy has only marginally improved.
Not theory, not speculation, not financial folly. Empirical proof.

I hope this adds some insight into this debate and encourages and challenges people to ask the question--why aren't we just making it here?
And to Mr. Lauren I again say, I have the utmost respect for you sir and I regret to see your fine name being so reviled. Yes, it was a mistake, but we've all made them. I look forward to 2014 and let me know if my factory can be of any help to you. It'll be just between us wink.gif
Now, let's all get back to the real action which is the Olympics themselves. Let's cheer our team and glory in their triumphs, share their losses and admire their sportsmanship.
Let the games begin. I can't wait!

Exactly.  We can compete globally.  Maybe more people would know this if they quit coming up with reasons why we cannot, and asked some locale textiles companies like yours to make something happen.

post #137 of 152
Skinny I respectfully submit that your statement about our number one status is incorrect.

Please also look at factors such as GNP growth and worldwide share which paint a poor trajectory.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/14/china-us-manufacturing_n_835470.html
post #138 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

America is currently the worlds largest manufacturer.

The US is probably the world's largest manufacturer of military and defence products. What about consumer products, like clothes, electronics, toys, etc?
post #139 of 152
Overall, that huff post is old btw.

We produce 1.83 trillion in Manufacturing output, china does 1.79 Trillion.
post #140 of 152
I refuse to eat chocolate chip cookies that are not baked in the US of A.

If I travel, though, I relax this rule.
post #141 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

I refuse to eat chocolate chip cookies that are not baked in the US of A.
If I travel, though, I relax this rule.

Pass the freedom fries.

post #142 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Overall, that huff post is old btw.
We produce 1.83 trillion in Manufacturing output, china does 1.79 Trillion.

Can't buy a Made in America Ralph Lauren blazer, or cellphone, or TV, or VCD/DVD player, or PC. or R/C toy helicopter though can I?
post #143 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott anderson View Post

The problem is we have been told for so long that we can't do it, we, like Lauren don't even bother asking the question. Should we make it here?
That is why I took Anderson-Little back. That is why I make my product here. That is why my company has grown a minimum of 20% per year in the four years since my Father and I relaunched it.
We bothered to ask the question. Can we make it here and really compete. The answer was a resounding yes. And we were absolutely right.
Let me repeat. I opened a textile company in the middle of the worst recession since the Great Depression. TEXTILES. I make my garments here in America. My company is a success and has double digit growth and the economy has only marginally improved.
Not theory, not speculation, not financial folly. Empirical proof.
I hope this adds some insight into this debate and encourages and challenges people to ask the question--why aren't we just making it here?
And to Mr. Lauren I again say, I have the utmost respect for you sir and I regret to see your fine name being so reviled. Yes, it was a mistake, but we've all made them. I look forward to 2014 and let me know if my factory can be of any help to you. It'll be just between us wink.gif

Sorry scott, I know we've resolved previous issues, but come on dude.

You sell a single item, a $179 55 poly/45 wool blazer. Thats it. Your website is a picture of I guess its you wearing a blazer, huge torn jeans, and square toed shoes. As far as I know, you have no retail distribution.

if you sold 10 blazers in year one, and 12 in year 2, you'd have your 20% gain...but that means very little at that level of production.

Now then, since you like to raise empirical proof and deride financial folly, lets get to it.

How many blazers have you sold in your past 4 years, broken down by year?

the reason you can afford to make your garment here is most likely because the material is so cheap that you have enough profit margin to pay a bit more for labor.

I'm sorry to tell you that you are but a teensy blip in the textile industry....and not even in a good way like HY or ercole, but with a poly wool/blend sportcoat of dubious quality.
post #144 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

Can't buy a Made in America Ralph Lauren blazer, or cellphone, or TV, or VCD/DVD player, or PC. or R/C toy helicopter though can I?

Is there a reason why you would want to?
post #145 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott anderson View Post

I have been silent on this matter as I have wanted to read, listen and research the elements of this situation.
Allow me to clarify and simplify this matter with a practical answer devoid of politics...

confused.gif
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but there is no aspect of our lives that isn't infested with politics. One cannot turn a blind eye to facts to validate an opinion. This isn't the Great American Sell-out anymore. It is now the Great American Give-away. It is an unfortunate and inescapable fact; whether it is regarding the subject of this thread or F. Corbera's chocolate chip cookie patronage, politics will be there.
post #146 of 152
I love chocolate chip cookies.
post #147 of 152
Red Chinese now gonna take away 'Mercas chocolate chip cookies?
post #148 of 152

Christ.... what was he smoking when he came up with the design? It looks ridiculous.

post #149 of 152
Do you think Ralph still has any of his goods pre-whenever from when the items were made in the USA? Or is all that stuff long gone? Might be a tall order, but the company might have enough new old stock lying around to outfit a US Olympic team in USA-made gear.

Or maybe he can lease some space from the Gitman factory or Martin Greenfield and just bang out some white cardigans, creme slacks and blue blazers. . . RL could lease the space at night - the factory could just stay open 24 hours a day until the unforms were ready. Made in the USA, with some good old American OT and night-differential thrown in for good measure nod[1].gif
post #150 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiloVance View Post

Do you think Ralph still has any of his goods pre-whenever from when the items were made in the USA? Or is all that stuff long gone? Might be a tall order, but the company might have enough new old stock lying around to outfit a US Olympic team in USA-made gear. :
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