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Your preferred finish on shell cords?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Curious to know the consensus. Which do you prefer:

1. Don't do anything to them. You like the patina that time and wear gives them.
2. A bright finish.
3. A matted, healthy finish.
4. Others?
post #2 of 35
1.
post #3 of 35
3. Please edit title
post #4 of 35
Nick, thanks for asking. My preference would be as follows.

4. Keep the patina. Clean the upper. Bone out creases as much as possible. Give healthy shine, nourish. Don't apply too much color, if any. Buff.

Regards.
post #5 of 35
The Mac Method.

Brush until your arm falls off.

Polish very rarely. Pay special attention to the welt/stitching as it needs moisture protection.

Allow patina to develop with time.
post #6 of 35
I prefer no2. But find it really hard to polish shell cordos. It always turns out to be matte finish. I read some where that Alden shells are shinny where as AE are more of a matte finish. I think the shine has to do with the finish(paint) these shoe maker apply on the leather(shell cordo). I have 3 pairs of shell by Florsheim DB. 2 of them are navy and dark cherry has the matte finish and the cordovan(burgundy) one is shinny. This is due to the heavy finish on the burgundy pair.
post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

The Mac Method.
Brush until your arm falls off.
Polish very rarely. Pay special attention to the welt/stitching as it needs moisture protection.
Allow patina to develop with time.
This. It really works well.
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Curious to know the consensus. Which do you prefer:
1. Don't do anything to them. You like the patina that time and wear gives them.
2. A bright finish.
3. A matted, healthy finish.
4. Others?

Hi Nick, are you asking b/c you'd like to know how to return shell shoes after refurbishment? If so my preference would be a simple cleaning, treatment with renovateur if needed, brushing, and a light coat of wax polish.
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2010 View Post

I prefer no2. But find it really hard to polish shell cordos. It always turns out to be matte finish. I read some where that Alden shells are shinny where as AE are more of a matte finish. I think the shine has to do with the finish(paint) these shoe maker apply on the leather(shell cordo). I have 3 pairs of shell by Florsheim DB. 2 of them are navy and dark cherry has the matte finish and the cordovan(burgundy) one is shinny. This is due to the heavy finish on the burgundy pair.

I agree that Aldens seem to be shinier than many other maker's make ups. On my Carmina and Crockett and Jones Shell I find that a couple of coats of polish when fresh out of the box got them off to a shiny start. But they weren't as shiny on their own as Alden's are.
post #10 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

Hi Nick, are you asking b/c you'd like to know how to return shell shoes after refurbishment? If so my preference would be a simple cleaning, treatment with renovateur if needed, brushing, and a light coat of wax polish.

Thanks for asking but, no.
I'm asking because I'm curious. There is no right or wrong answer to the question.
If someone does not request a specific finish we use our judgment on what to do with them. We use the condition of the shoe when it came in as a guide for determining.
We only use 3 products on cords.
1. Saph. Reno.
2. Saph MDO. made specifically for cords. Black, brown, neutral and, cordovan. (I'm going to try and convince the people at Saphir to make a whiskey color as well).
3. Venetian.
Sometimes we use a combination of the above.
Any cords that have light colored stitching get either the Reno or Venetian. Sometimes both.

Interesting though......When customers, wearing shells come in for a shine (on the stand) sometimes they ask for a parade-like shine and love the results. Others will ask for Saphir "not to shinny".
So, you as an individual may have a specific preference. The next guy's preference may be different.

I picked up some deer bones from Germany a while back. I've experimented with them on some scraps. I wasn't impressed with the results.
So, I've drawn 2 conclusions:
1. We don't have the proper technique down.
2. It's an over-rated theory.
In either case I find that it's a "risk is not worth the reward" issue.

Your comments please....
post #11 of 35
Nick,

If you have the time I wonder if you might share your observations as to the differences you see between Venetian and Reno on shell. What might make you choose one over the other in a given situation?

Interesting about the deer bone. I've been skeptical of the cost/value proposition of this one. I have used the 'old spoon trick' for smoothing out a scratch or two and it worked well. Just not sure the bone is something I really need.
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Thanks for asking but, no.
I'm asking because I'm curious. There is no right or wrong answer to the question.
If someone does not request a specific finish we use our judgment on what to do with them. We use the condition of the shoe when it came in as a guide for determining.
We only use 3 products on cords.
1. Saph. Reno.
2. Saph MDO. made specifically for cords. Black, brown, neutral and, cordovan. (I'm going to try and convince the people at Saphir to make a whiskey color as well).
3. Venetian.
Sometimes we use a combination of the above.
Any cords that have light colored stitching get either the Reno or Venetian. Sometimes both.
Interesting though......When customers, wearing shells come in for a shine (on the stand) sometimes they ask for a parade-like shine and love the results. Others will ask for Saphir "not to shinny".
So, you as an individual may have a specific preference. The next guy's preference may be different.
I picked up some deer bones from Germany a while back. I've experimented with them on some scraps. I wasn't impressed with the results.
So, I've drawn 2 conclusions:
1. We don't have the proper technique down.
2. It's an over-rated theory.
In either case I find that it's a "risk is not worth the reward" issue.
Your comments please....

Never really a fan of a very high shine on shell. Looks too plastic.

I use my deer bone only for scratches and mars. It doesn't work for me without reno though. I use the bone to work the reno in. Usually works like a charm.

I'm dubious of the claim that the bone itself has essential oils that somehow make their way onto the shell. I've tested this by wrapping the bone in paper towels. I don't see any oils coming out onto the paper, so if there are oils we aren't talking about alot. My bone is basically new, so it's not as if it has dried out.
post #13 of 35
I spent nearly 5 minutes trying to work out what shell has to do with corduroy trousers...
post #14 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Nick,
If you have the time I wonder if you might share your observations as to the differences you see between Venetian and Reno on shell. What might make you choose one over the other in a given situation?
Interesting about the deer bone. I've been skeptical of the cost/value proposition of this one. I have used the 'old spoon trick' for smoothing out a scratch or two and it worked well. Just not sure the bone is something I really need.

From my experience the Venetian seems to penetrate deeper into the pores of the skin.
So, with older or dried out skins we feed the leather with Venetian first. This gives us a better base. Then we apply the Reno.
If you work both of the products equally as hard, the Venetian will leave a brighter finish than the Reno. That's something I don't like on shell cord skins (just my preference though).
As for my taste, shell cords should have a luxurious finish somewhat of a healthy glow look.
I suspect the inclusion of a slight amount of mink oil in the Reno is what keeps it from giving as bright a shine as the Venetian.
I'm not a fan of mink oil on fine leathers. However, the Reno seems to have the perfect amount in it's formula to give the benefit of lubricating the leather without it caking on, impossible to remove and, causing it to attract dust and dirt.

Agree on the spoon. It's safer and, more consistent.
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

Never really a fan of a very high shine on shell. Looks too plastic.
I use my deer bone only for scratches and mars. It doesn't work for me without reno though. I use the bone to work the reno in. Usually works like a charm.
I'm dubious of the claim that the bone itself has essential oils that somehow make their way onto the shell. I've tested this by wrapping the bone in paper towels. I don't see any oils coming out onto the paper, so if there are oils we aren't talking about alot. My bone is basically new, so it's not as if it has dried out.

Paper towel trick won't show anything unless you heat the bone; friction with the shell could create enough heat, perhaps.

Though I'm not going to get a deer bone.
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