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Nominate the best posts on the forum and (maybe) win a prize - ongoing Front Page contest - Page 7

post #91 of 228
Best thread in months:
http://www.styleforum.net/t/308035/on-pattern-coordination-between-jacket-shirt-tie
post #92 of 228
OK, F. Corbera (X Christina Lee) delivers a highly useful, perfect-for-the-front-page post: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308529/shirting-patterns-by-christina-lee#post_5609192
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
This is by Christina Lee at Alexander West.

Shirt Pattern List

Many variations of the major patterns exist as designers are constantly trying to come up with new and different styles. Shirt patterns are often enhanced or can be a combination of different patterns. These are the classic pattern choices.

CHECKS

Gingham - Gingham usually comes in a checkered pattern and is distinguished by white and colored, even-sized checks. This pattern is formed by horizontal and vertical stripes (usually of the same color) that cross each other on a white background to form even checks. Gingham originated as a striped pattern when it was first imported in the 17th century and had become woven into a check pattern during the mid-18th century, with blue and white being the most popular choice in color.



Madras - Madras is a pattern that originated in a city in East India, formerly named Madras. This summer fabric style is distinguished by a pattern of colorful checks and stripes. The stripes of a madras check or plaid consist of different colored stripes that cross each other to form uneven checks. Madras has become a popular “preppy” pattern for shorts and casual shirts.



Tartan Plaid - Tartan plaid is the pattern that is most often found on Scottish kilts. This plaid consists of vertical and horizontal or diagonal stripes that cross each other to form different sized checks. This pattern is often done in a twill-weave and should only be used as a casual shirt.





Shepherd’s check - This pattern is a twill-weave of small, even-sized, colored and white checks. While this check often resembles the gingham check, the visible twill weave is what distinguishes the shepherd’s check from gingham. The name derives from the plaid worn by shepherds in the hills of the Scottish borders. The hounds tooth pattern originated from the Shepherd’s check.



Houndstooth - The houndstooth pattern has a similar pattern featured in the Shepherd’s check and Glen plaid. The checks that make up the houndstooth are broken/uneven and pointy-shaped (like a hound’s tooth). The houndstooth pattern is traditionally black and white but can be found in a variety of colors and on a variety of garments and accessories nowadays.



Glen Plaid/Prince of Wales Check - Glen plaid, also known as the Prince of Wales check, is a pattern most commonly found in suits. It is woven in a twill pattern and consists of broken checks where a conglomerate of alternating dark stripes and light stripes cross each other to create a pattern of small and large checks. This pattern is usually done in a muted color with white.



Windowpane Check - The windowpane check is a pattern that resembles the pattern of panes on a window. The stripes that cross to form windowpane checks are often thicker and farther apart than the pattern found in graph checks.



Graph Check - This is a check pattern that resembles the crossing lines of graph paper. The graph check pattern is characterized by solid, thin, single-colored stripes that cross each other to form even and small-sized checks. The stripes that create a graph check are thinner than the stripes in a windowpane check.



Tattersall - Tatersall is a check pattern that consists of thin, regularly spaced stripes in alternating colors that are repeated both horizontally and vertically. The stripes that create the tatersall pattern often come in two different colors and are usually darker than the background color.



Mini-check - This is a pattern consisting of very small and even sized checks. It usually consists of one color with white and often resembles the gingham check-except that it’s a lot smaller. This pattern is more casual than stripes, but dressier than larger checks.



Pin check - is is a pattern created by pin sized stripes (about 1 yarn thick) that cross to form tiny checks that look like dots to the human eye. This pattern often consists of one color with white. This small check effect gives the shirt a textured solid effect.




STRIPES

Awning Stripe - Awning stripes are the widest sized stripes that can be found on shirts. These vertical and even stripes are often wider than ¼” and usually consist of solid colored stripes on white. The name derives from the wide stripe pattern found on awning fabrics. Wider stripes tend to be used mostly for casual shirts.



Bengal - Bengal stripes vertical stripes that are narrower than awning stripes but wider than candy stripes (approximately ¼” in width). Bengal stripes usually consist of solid colored stripes on white.



Candy Stripe - Candy stripes are vertical and even stripes that are wider than pencil stripes but thinner than Bengal stripes. Candy stripes are usually about 1/8” in width and are characterized by solid, bold stripes on white. The name derives from the stripe pattern found on stick candy.



Pencil Stripe - Pencil stripes, also referred to as dress stripes, are often thinner than candy stripes but wider than pinstripes. The width between the stripes varies from shirt to shirt and the stripes are almost always uneven (more white than color).



Pin stripe - Pin stripes are thin, vertical stripes that are narrower than pencil stripes. Pin stripes are usually one to two yarns thick and are sometimes broken. The widths between the stripes vary but are always wider apart than hairline stripes.



Hairline Stripe - Hairline stripes are thin stripes that are about the width of a hair. Hairline stripes are spaced very close together which gives the shirt a textured solid effect. This effect makes this a flexible pattern for shirts.



Bar Code Stripe - The bar code stripe pattern consists of different sized stripes that are closely spaced together. This pattern resembles the lines on a bar code-hence its name. Bar code stripes usually consist of 2 colors or varied tones of one color.



Shadow Stripe - Shadow stripes consist of vertical stripes with another stripe directly adjacent to it or bordering it- creating a shadow effect. Shadow stripes generally vary in width and usually consist of two or three different colors.






Special thanks to Nicole Kabbaz for working with us on putting this list together.

Researched and written by Christina Lee.

I couldn't get the photos in the spoilered text, but they're very good.
Edited by The Thin Man - 7/21/12 at 7:04am
post #93 of 228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

1. Many basic topics relevant to MC were covered in great depth years ago on other sites, leaving the subset of those guys who are active in some form on SF—and who can discuss these topics with intelligence and direct knowledge—uninterested in recapitulation. So, the "old" content on SF is shallower than one might presume since the center of gravity for such topics was never here. In contrast, those other sites purposefully excluded the topics that interest those on SF who are active in SW&D.
This is why SF's DNA is more about casual clothes despite the significant traffic that might come through here seeking answers to questions about coat and tie. Streetwear is SF's knowledge repository, thus, it does not surprise me that this "feature the best post" effort is skewed that way.
2. There is very little snark on MC today. There is a fair bit of shallow and juvenile rudeness. The cleverness of insider jokes has declined with the decline of the cleverness of insiders.
3. The number of members who are, or are trying, to make money by selling to other members is a more pervasive element than before, and the whole site has a more commercial feel. This casts a subtle pall over things. It is hard to say if this is better or worse than the ham-handed brute commercialism of Ask Andy, or the even the London Lounge, but it's pretty much killed the "we're all in this together" tone of the past.
4. There are better, technologically more advanced, outlets now for some of the most fun things relating to clothes. Blogging and tumblr, for example, although that is not everyone's bag.
No reason to weep. Such changes are merely the way things are.

I disagree with pretty much all of this, though I suspect that I'm not going to be able to convince the poster that this is true. I'm going to quickly address points 2, 3, and 4) before going back to 1).
2) The snark levels have always varied, as has the rudeness levels. If you look at the earliest, developmental stages of the forum (say, 2002-2004) there is very little in the way of snark, and a lot more in the way of gentle and earnest advice. During the really large growth periods (2007-2011), when traffic and posting increased by about 100%+ per year, the snarkiness and honestly, general nastiness levels also varied.
3) The fact is that there were many more vendors (though they did not pay any fee at that time) in about 2004-2005 than there are today.
4) Blogging and Tumblr are great for broadcasting a specific point of view. Neither are particularly good for conversations. This is the strength of discussion forums, which are a very old technology. Twitter gets it better, but the 140 character limit really limits the conversations to snippets and bon mots. It's not enough. People want to converse in long forum with one another. The points in the post above, for example, could not be made on twitter in any sensible fashion.

Now, onto 1)

There are plenty of things to talk about, but which people do not, or at least not on a regular basis. A few topics that I can think of off the top of my head which would lend themselves to good discussion topics:

i) The emergence online MTM outfits and how that impacts on traditional tailors and shirtmakers.
ii) How have traditional haberdashers been responding to pressure from the internet, and what adjustments have they been making best use of their natural advantages (this discussion was had over in SW&D, and a similar, but even more important, discussion could be had here, for a number of reasons.)
iii) The balance between increasing and having smarter PR, marketing, and adjusting to the changing needs of the market (personally, I think that PR is what is needed, and that outfits like Gieves and Hawkes chose the wrong approach, while firms like Trickers and John Lobb chose the right path.)

And these are just topics in which I am personally interested, since I am interested in the digital landscape and in the business of clothing.

There are lots of topics about production (like the rampant abuse of the "Super" system, and tricks that mills use to get a higher number, at the detriment of their product; can a machine actually be constructed to do true pickstitching, and can it be cost effective) trends (how did Neapolitan tailoring become so popular, compared to say, English? Are young workers being found to replace old workers. Why or why not? Contrast tailoring with watchmaking, etc...)

Anyway, back on topic. Let's see what we've come up with in the past year. I challenge you to find the cool discussions and interesting photologs, and to start more new and interesting discussions. Let's try to get a winning post or two from MC.
post #94 of 228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

The problem is that SWD actually puts in effort to discuss things. Granted, there's a lot of useless chatter about shopping and item-specific questions, but so much of MC is either snark and inside jokes (which, don't get me wrong, I love), or people asking what they should wear to an interview. SWD, on the other hand, tries to talk about concepts behind designer collections or discusses issues such as whether online shopping is killing retail B&Ms. Whether one finds that interesting or not, it's better than many of the new threads on MC.

It should be noted that analogous conversations can be had here. For example, "blogger blue" did not appear out of nowhere. Next summer, you'll be seeing a more subdued blue that has neither a lot of purples nor greens, but has more grey. Chisel toes have been replaced to a large degree with more round toe shoes. Trends occur in tailored clothing and accessories. And online shopping is happening in tailored clothing more and more, and the technology for getting proper measurements is getting better and better.
post #95 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

i) The emergence online MTM outfits and how that impacts on traditional tailors and shirtmakers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

technology for getting proper measurements is getting better and better.

I'm interested in this too. I thought William Field's answer from my interview with him was interesting:

What's the difference between bespoke and made-to-measure? Why is it so hard for the online sites doing made-to-measure to replicate the fit of true bespoke?

They're not really seeing the person's form. Measuring someone is not just a snapshot. As you're measuring someone, you're asking them about styling, measuring them again, seeing how they move. And at some point in that measuring process, they'll relax a little bit, and then you'll really get to see their form. They're not ramrod straight anymore or sucking in their gut so much, they're relaxed a bit more, and you'll really see the pitch. Maybe they seem down right a half an inch, which is typical, but then they relax and you'll see, it's really three-quarters of an inch. So those computers, like the ones that will do a scan of you, measure you in a static pose, and when you're not very relaxed. Then when you relax, the suit's not going to fit anymore. Then when it gets to the maker, say in China, they'll sort of look at the numbers, and say oh, let's use, say this pattern, a block pattern. Then they finish it up, send it off, and that's it, without any fittings. And they'll probably never see that suit again, because who's going to send it back to China for alterations and deal with all the back and forth?
post #96 of 228
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

I'm interested in this too. I thought William Field's answer from my interview with him was interesting:
What's the difference between bespoke and made-to-measure? Why is it so hard for the online sites doing made-to-measure to replicate the fit of true bespoke?
They're not really seeing the person's form. Measuring someone is not just a snapshot. As you're measuring someone, you're asking them about styling, measuring them again, seeing how they move. And at some point in that measuring process, they'll relax a little bit, and then you'll really get to see their form. They're not ramrod straight anymore or sucking in their gut so much, they're relaxed a bit more, and you'll really see the pitch. Maybe they seem down right a half an inch, which is typical, but then they relax and you'll see, it's really three-quarters of an inch. So those computers, like the ones that will do a scan of you, measure you in a static pose, and when you're not very relaxed. Then when you relax, the suit's not going to fit anymore. Then when it gets to the maker, say in China, they'll sort of look at the numbers, and say oh, let's use, say this pattern, a block pattern. Then they finish it up, send it off, and that's it, without any fittings. And they'll probably never see that suit again, because who's going to send it back to China for alterations and deal with all the back and forth?

I agree with this, personally, but I also wonder how much consumers care, or can be made to care, and where does price become too much of a consideration. Think you could make this into a new thread, and we can start this conversations again?

Cheers,


Fok.
post #97 of 228
Here's a good post from the "Maomao x Gaz Sartorial Adventure 2012" thread. I can't remember if this was already on the front page: http://www.styleforum.net/t/301187/maomao-x-gaz-italian-sartorial-adventure-2012/45#post_5514251
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

Day 1, Naples
We kicked of Day 1 early, with a train ride from Rome to Naples, arriving at Napoli Centrali at about 10AM. It so happened that it was the week of the America's Cup but unfortunately the weather was poor and we didn't take any happy snaps. Plus, we didn't want to bring too much attention to ourselves. Applying the "Shenzhen travel protocol" meant no watches, no cameras, money stashed in one's underwear and attempt to not look like a tourist. I think dressing in a blue sports coat, gray pants, brown shoes and a white shirt may have helped us blend in with the locals.
So into a cab we go, off to London House. Marianno was expecting Mao Mao and had travelled back from Capri for the fitting.
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Works in progress
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Marianno does his thing...
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Highlight of our time at London House was the discussion between Mao Mao and Marianno on how much waist suppression was necessary.
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Grey London House hopsack
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Blue linen
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Luca drops by to say "Hi". He joked that proof he was Marianno's son was they both independently wore the same yellow sweater.
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DB navy fresco, if I recall.
After the fitting, Marianno insisted that he show us the rest of the London House hopsack. We adjourned to the larger bespoke room up the back where all the cloth were kept. In this room, I saw first hand the art of selling by Marianno Rubinacci. He starts of slow, pulling out a single bolt of a London House hopsack. He gauges our reaction. Upon seeing our eyes light up, he strikes. From then on, bolt after bolt of fabric, from the house hopsack to a rather strange herringbone weaved cotton denim, was flung across a large antique table with the panache of Neapolitan showmanship passed down from generation to generation.
It was there, Mao Mao suggest that I consider a Rubinacci suit over my original choice of getting another Liverano suit when we visit Florence the following day. He made several compelling arguments on price, wardrobe diversity and "well, you are here already..."
I finally committed after Mao Mao agreed to provide input on the styling and thus the genesis of my Rubinacci X Mao Mao suit.
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Following our fittings, we headed to Mattozzi, a few doors down from London House, for lunch
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The watch is there for scale
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Buffalo mozzarella with cherry tomatoes and rocket
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Rigatoni with tomatoes, eggplant and mozzarella
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Grilled squid
Coming up next, our afternoon in Naples.
post #98 of 228
T4phage introduces the forum to Passaggio Cravatte: http://www.styleforum.net/t/279022/new-ties#post_5036594
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage View Post

several months ago
i was introduced to teh
owner of 'passagio cravatte'
another maker of bespoke ties
who specialises in 'brighter'
prints and wovens with a 'vintage feel'
i initially ordered a grenadine
and a soft italian cashmere regimental
however there was a problem -
the cashmere was made up
in an unlined 7 fold....
.. and the fabric was not suited
for such a construction - it tended
to open up.
so it is now being remade
as a 4 fold unlined.
the owner also had a few
vintage silks and wools
which i subsequently ordered
and received.
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l-r:
grenadine - cashmere - vintage wool - vintage madder - vintage wool - vintage silk
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backside of the cashmere in untipped 4 fold
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back of the vintage wool in what he calls
'7 fold unlined'
which only has the wool interlining
around the neck
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a normal untipped 7 fold
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a crisp and thin wool
construction is all very well done
except for the initial cashmere
i ordered.
some of his newer fabrics;
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post #99 of 228
Here's a good one from Montesquieu tonight: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308717/bespoke-bicycles#post_5612015
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montesquieu View Post

I haven't posted on SF in a few years. During that time period, the bespoke bug that bit me here infected another of my passions, cycling. In honor of the Tour's conclusion today, I'm sharing shots of my and my wife's custom bikes, made by a few of the world's best. If you have any of your own, feel free to add.
Designer: Steve Hampsten (brother of American Giro d'Italia-winner, Andy Hampsten)
Frame: Strada Bianca, titanium, custom geometry
Paint: raw, matte bead blasted by Kent Eriksen
Intended use: gravel roads, nasty pavement, rainy days, recovery rides
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Designer/builder: Dario Pegoretti (famous maker of a few of Miguel Indurain's Tour-winning bikes)
Frame: Responsorium, TIG-welded stainless steel, custom geometry
Paint: one-of-a-kind creation by Dario
Intended use: long rides, mountains
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Designer: Sacha White
Frame: Speedvagen Road, TIG-welded steel, made-to-measure geometry
Paint: Surprise Me Gold, unique on a road frame, by COAT
Intended use: fast group rides, flats, races
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Designer: Richard Sachs
Frame: Road, lugged steel
Paint: TBD
Wait list: 7 years, 2.5 of which have passed. I'll share this one in approximately 2016.
My wife’s bike
Designer/builder: Dave Kirk
Frame: Terraplane, fillet-brazed steel, custom geometry
Paint: unique design by me and Joe Bell
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post #100 of 228
Thread Starter 
I do like these. I especially like the Mao Mao one. Will probably use that, and put it up with the "thread of the month" contenders. I'm sorta thinking either Drakes scarves or ties for the winners. Maybe scarves, since you really need one when it's 90F outside.
post #101 of 228
Thread Starter 
Today, we have two special winners. In SW&D, this was too delicious to pass up:

Fuuma, nominated by Hendrix: http://www.styleforum.net/t/131495/random-fashion-thoughts/61750_50#post_5614513

and in MC, a much more serious post about very expensive suits:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/301187/maomao-x-gaz-italian-sartorial-adventure-2012/0_50#post_5514251

Everyone is a winner today.
post #102 of 228
Another good post from edmorel: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308954/on-solid-and-solid-like-jackets-shirts-ties#post_5617445
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

So as an antithesis to the pattern threak, in this threak I'll talk about my feelings on pulling off the solid and solid-like shirt/tie/jacket/suit without looking boring. Keep in mind these are my opinions, not some dogma or rule that I want the world to follow. I dress like this the majority of the time, with the occasional FU jacket thrown in. How is this different than the CBD thread? In a way its not except that sportcoat fits are pretty non-existent there and also things like pinstripe suits and multi patterns are posted over there. If that stuff gets posted here, I'm deleting it. Pinstripes scare me cry.gif Also, no loud sportcoats with solid tie/solid shirt. We get that, its not really difficult.
I find that there are two issues with people trying to dress in this manner. The first is that they seem to think they look to boring and need to spruce it up with either a super loud tie, some #menswear accessories or crazy shoes. "Well I was wearing a solid sportcoat/shirt and pants so I figured I'd wear the green croc double monks". The second issue is that they in fact do look boring due to the outfit just not being cohesive, wrong textures/colors etc . So hopefully this thread will evolve into people posting their pics, maybe looking for suggestions etc. The stuff below is just stuff I threw on quickly for the pics, again its how I dress but I there are obviously many different combo's that can work.
Here is a basic outfit (pants would be grey, any shade, ideally flannel and dark brown suede shoes), you can add a solid blue shirt here, I just has this handy. Solid jacket, solid tie, basically solid shirt. No pocketsquare. Boring at fist glance but look at the texture in the jacket and the tie. They add visual interest. A solid brown tie, at least in these parts, is a pretty rare occurence, it adds enough contrast to the blue of the jacket and shirt, no need to add more color in terms of a square or multi color shirt. Simple and sweet but well dressed at the same time, keep in mind the dark brown suede shoes.
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Basically the same outfit, but this is a suit (same suede shoes), two colors but a textured jacket and a textured tie. Enough visual interest that you don't need more flash/bang. Let the simplicity stand on its own.
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Lastly, a silk neat tie in a sportcoat fit. I don't like silk prints with textured coats, I think they look out of place. The same holds for textured ties with worsted, just looks wrong to me. Here is basically a worsted sportcoat (slight herringbone pattern and the fabric is actually cashmere) and a texture shirt (jersey cotton like a polo shirt) with a silk print. Again, not a lot of colors, very basic look but there is enough visual interest that all I would add are solid pants (grey or brown) and brown shoes.
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post #103 of 228
And another from Gazman (not to get repetitive): http://www.styleforum.net/t/301187/maomao-x-gaz-italian-sartorial-adventure-2012/105#post_5615436
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by gazman70k View Post

Great to see some interesting views on the casualness of fresco and the whole secret tailor nonsense. If you dislike the secret tailor issue, sorry to disappoint as I am about to introduce another.
Day 2, Florence
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Colourful old buildings...
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... steeped in history and ...
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...public nudity.
Pity that during our visit, the weather was terrible. It drizzled when we arrived from Rome and we managed to catch a break in the rain as we made our way to the Panerai boutique. While we were there, it began to pour.
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ALL PHOTOS ABOVE ARE FROM PREVIOUS TRIPS TO FLORENCE
Patrizia, the Panerai boutique manager, was kind enough to have bought us a couple of rain coats from street vendors, and we made our way to see Antonio and Taka over at Liverano. Maomao was there for one, or was it two fittings. I forget and besides I had completed my initial order from Liverano. I won't add to the already plentiful photos of the Liverano & Liverano atelier. Instead, here's a few of my previous items which I received via the Armoury.
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These are autumn / winter wear. Photos courtesy of Ethan @ the Armoury.
After the fittings, we did a little shopping and then it was time for lunch with Antonio and Taka. No photos because we were talking secret men's business.
After lunch, we visited Fukaya-san of il micio.
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Camel skin derby... perhaps the next order.
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A whole cut that is a little too funky.
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We also met our secret tailor there...
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...who made this particular solaro suit for Fukaya-san.
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We headed back to his atelier where he had recently moved his operations to a three bedroom apartment. Business has been good for him. Previously, he worked out of his small one bedroom apartment. Believe it or not, this is a one-person operation.
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A charcoal sharksin suit, which I orginally ordered in late 2010. This was my third fitting. I am expecting delivery in late August.
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Holland and Sherry Gamekeeper Tweed. Also ordered in late 2010.
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Holland and Sherry something or rather, summer weight. Apparently its vintage. This one will hopefully be ready in November. My seasonal cylce is out of whack!
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A better representation of the colour and subtle patterns.
It took little convincing for Maomao to give this secret tailor a try.
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And according to the sartorial wisdom of Mao, the first order of any new bespoke tailor should consist of a single breasted jacket and a double breasted jacket of which either has a pair of matching paints. This allows the tailor to have a base pattern for all your future orders. Makes sense if you can afford it.
Next, day 3, eating in Rome.
PS can't complaint that the Euro is tanking for the greater sartorial good.
post #104 of 228
Fuuma. All day.
post #105 of 228
Two words: HERMES MAN
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