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dress code and culture at work - Page 6

post #76 of 92
Look, here's the thing: I'm four years out at one of New Zealand's largest firms. We're the local branch of a larger still Australian/English firm. We are not a large firm by American standards.

But:
- If I give legal research to an intern (with half a law degree), it's because we won't be billing their time and it might save me time down the line. And it's because I like them and want to give them good work.
- Graduates can expect a lot of photocopying. And there have been graduates I (a) only trust with photocopying; and (b) don't even trust with photocopying. People in category (b) will struggle to make budget, because I won't be alone.
- I don't care about your background, intelligence or grades. I care about your reliability. I get work from people more senior than me, and they expect to be able to rely on me to produce quality work. I pass work down, and most of what I pass down...shit, I just want to be able to rely on you to (a) produce work that I can turn into quality work; (b) not get me into trouble; (c) not give me any surprises; and (d) photocopy things with no missing or upside down pages. That's about it.

Here, dress codes are a lot more flashy in many ways than what a lot in this thread suggest. Cufflinks are standard and no one would bat an eyelid at a tie clip (but would add that watch (which, by the way, people might assume you bought at a marked in Bali). There's a guy in his second year out who wears seersucker suits, and a lot of the male junior solicitors, myself included, probably peacock a wee bit too much. But flash from a summer clerk or intern? Shit no. We just expect you to be wearing pants and a shirt that either almost fit you or fit your dad. To be honest, most students I see trying to show off in how they dress just look silly.
post #77 of 92

Agree comprehensively with Luddite's post above - and I think that's because of the Euro/Asian influences we have..

 

Although I am still considered "young" - I'm vehemently against, especially in my industry, youngsters who dress 'over the top' - and this harks back to every other comment made in this thread and it's about _fitting_in_ and _knowing_your_place_.

 

I know for sure if you presented a 21 year old to any of the senior management here, they'd have a serious issue with the image they'd be projecting.

 

Varies from industry to industry too I suspect.

 

Further TKE - good luck on your career - it seems the US is a pretty tough place to work!

post #78 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luddite View Post

Look, here's the thing: I'm four years out at one of New Zealand's largest firms. We're the local branch of a larger still Australian/English firm. We are not a large firm by American standards.
But:
- If I give legal research to an intern (with half a law degree), it's because we won't be billing their time and it might save me time down the line. And it's because I like them and want to give them good work.
- Graduates can expect a lot of photocopying. And there have been graduates I (a) only trust with photocopying; and (b) don't even trust with photocopying. People in category (b) will struggle to make budget, because I won't be alone.
- I don't care about your background, intelligence or grades. I care about your reliability. I get work from people more senior than me, and they expect to be able to rely on me to produce quality work. I pass work down, and most of what I pass down...shit, I just want to be able to rely on you to (a) produce work that I can turn into quality work; (b) not get me into trouble; (c) not give me any surprises; and (d) photocopy things with no missing or upside down pages. That's about it.
Here, dress codes are a lot more flashy in many ways than what a lot in this thread suggest. Cufflinks are standard and no one would bat an eyelid at a tie clip (but would add that watch (which, by the way, people might assume you bought at a marked in Bali). There's a guy in his second year out who wears seersucker suits, and a lot of the male junior solicitors, myself included, probably peacock a wee bit too much. But flash from a summer clerk or intern? Shit no. We just expect you to be wearing pants and a shirt that either almost fit you or fit your dad. To be honest, most students I see trying to show off in how they dress just look silly.

And you expect your boss doesn't think the same thing about your peacocking.
post #79 of 92
That is why I said that, honestly, a lot of junior solicitors - myself included - probably push it a wee bit too far. The point is that the margin of what you can get away with expands with seniority.
post #80 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luddite View Post

That is why I said that, honestly, a lot of junior solicitors - myself included - probably push it a wee bit too far. The point is that the margin of what you can get away with expands with seniority.

I'd also say that in some organisations, youngsters are allowed this type of behaviour, but it gets more conservative as you move up. Reverse-peacocking if you will.

post #81 of 92

I read 6 pages of this thread, just to make sure no one had already said this.  Somehow, they haven't.

 

IRON YOUR SHIRT.

 

Showing up in gaudy accessories in a shirt that just came out of the wrapping makes it look like ya swung by target on your way to your first day of work.  So again:

 

IRON YOUR SHIRT!

post #82 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luddite View Post

Look, here's the thing: I'm four years out at one of New Zealand's largest firms. We're the local branch of a larger still Australian/English firm. We are not a large firm by American standards.
But:
- If I give legal research to an intern (with half a law degree), it's because we won't be billing their time and it might save me time down the line. And it's because I like them and want to give them good work.
- Graduates can expect a lot of photocopying. And there have been graduates I (a) only trust with photocopying; and (b) don't even trust with photocopying. People in category (b) will struggle to make budget, because I won't be alone.
- I don't care about your background, intelligence or grades. I care about your reliability. I get work from people more senior than me, and they expect to be able to rely on me to produce quality work. I pass work down, and most of what I pass down...shit, I just want to be able to rely on you to (a) produce work that I can turn into quality work; (b) not get me into trouble; (c) not give me any surprises; and (d) photocopy things with no missing or upside down pages. That's about it.
Here, dress codes are a lot more flashy in many ways than what a lot in this thread suggest. Cufflinks are standard and no one would bat an eyelid at a tie clip (but would add that watch (which, by the way, people might assume you bought at a marked in Bali). There's a guy in his second year out who wears seersucker suits, and a lot of the male junior solicitors, myself included, probably peacock a wee bit too much. But flash from a summer clerk or intern? Shit no. We just expect you to be wearing pants and a shirt that either almost fit you or fit your dad. To be honest, most students I see trying to show off in how they dress just look silly.

"One of New Zeland's Biggest Firms". Hahaha!

I didn't know New Zeland had more than one law firm, honestly.
post #83 of 92
Well, that was...enlightening.

There are six large firms in the country, each with in the range of 40-50+ partners and 150+ lawyers. Each has a close strategic relationship with an Australian or London-based firm, or both (with, from recollection, two exceptions, the large Australian firms have aligned themselves or merged with a London firm).
post #84 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetManChris View Post

I read 6 pages of this thread, just to make sure no one had already said this.  Somehow, they haven't.

IRON YOUR SHIRT.

Showing up in gaudy accessories in a shirt that just came out of the wrapping makes it look like ya swung by target on your way to your first day of work.  So again:

IRON YOUR SHIRT!

The thread is only one page long if your settings are correct. satisfied.gif
post #85 of 92
While I agree with the general sentiment, you guys should just let the kid dress however he wants.

Nothing will teach him better than the experience of getting clowned at work.
post #86 of 92
Hmm. I'm wondering if TKE could teach me how to dougie. I feel like he'd know how.
post #87 of 92
Can someone repost those pics with caps of the OP golfing or whatever, they were golden.
post #88 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luddite View Post

Well, that was...enlightening.
There are six large firms in the country, each with in the range of 40-50+ partners and 150+ lawyers. Each has a close strategic relationship with an Australian or London-based firm, or both (with, from recollection, two exceptions, the large Australian firms have aligned themselves or merged with a London firm).

Australian firms are the worst. The lawyers either have no imagination whatsoever ("your trademark was refused. nothing we can do I guess!"), or are more verbose than a feminist studies major outside of a Ryan Sorba lecture.
post #89 of 92
I would hate to suggest that this may have anything at all to do with the fact that they employ Australians. That would be rude and childish.
post #90 of 92
Hey OP, post some more pics of that watch, particularly the crown guard, because it looks fake to me.
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