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furniture at Ikea - Page 2

post #16 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
wut duz that make Armani Casa?
furniture for the fascist in you?
post #17 of 78
a nickel for each plastic bag.
post #18 of 78
I have a lot of stuff from IKEA. Cheap and non-durable describes it best. It's not going to last forever. Best for college students, young people without the cash outfront to splurge on solid wood furniture, and so on. Most should pieces should last about 5 years... by then, the veneers will be all scratched, wood will be warped, etc. Your tastes will have changed, and you'll likely want to upgrade. If your furniture is still in good condition, don't just throw it out... move it to a basement, spare bedroom, or give it to goodwill. The resale value of IKEA stuff is pretty decent as well, because of the namebrand, and college students love it.

The worst part is the fucking "Cult of IKEA". Those who consider it to be the ONLY furniture store to shop at, and load their house up with it so much you can't walk a step without tripping over the latest IKEA creation. They have boxes for their boxes, that they put in their organizing shelf, and everything must match perfectly. IKEA generally rips off much more expensive, and well made solid wood Scandinavian designs. The Poang chair is a ripoff of a $500 similar looking model made in Finland by some company that the name escapes me. The name has now become synonymous with Scandinavian design. If you're really interested in light, bright colours, whites, modern designs... you can get some very pricy quality shit from Scandinavia, but likely everybody who comes over to your house will say "oh, cool... your place looks like an IKEA catalogue".
post #19 of 78
Several of my friends have the Ikea POÄNG armchair:

http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/store...mber=S19805433

They seem to be durable, and it's very comfortable: it's the chair everyone tries to get into first.

--Andre
post #20 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew
Several of my friends have the Ikea POÄNG armchair:

http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/store...mber=S19805433

They seem to be durable, and it's very comfortable: it's the chair everyone tries to get into first.

--Andre
the original... at about 40x the price.
post #21 of 78
Unless you're still in college or fresh out of college, you should try to do better than Ikea. What's the point of getting a cheap couch there when you'll either need to replace it in a few years, or you'll be too embarrassed about its tackiness? If you can hold on a little longer, save up for something durable and a little classy.
post #22 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandwagonesque
The Poang chair is a ripoff of a $500 similar looking model made in Finland by some company that the name escapes me.

you don't need to go as far as finland. Here is one of the Aalto "poang" manufactured by Herman Miller. It dates from 1938.


yeah, IKEA borrowed a lot from Alvar Aalto, like this stool from 1932:



!luc
post #23 of 78
My apartment is furnished by a combination of hand-me-downs, cheap IKEA stuff (most bought off Craigs list for ridiculously cheap), thrift store and consignment store buys and a couple milk crates from the dumpster area of Ralphs.

The whole apartment cost maybe... $500 to furnish. It sure isn't anything like iammatt's or luc's taste but it's very comfortable and warm. A majority of the cost came from the ergonomic office furniture I bought used for designing at home. Some Knoll stuff, Humanscale, etc.

So far nothing is broken, and nothing shows any really bad signs of wear either.. I'd recommend a similar path if you're really on a budget. My roommate and I went out to thrift stores and found a sofa in absolutely perfect condition, a nice fabric and extremely comfortable that only ran us 50 bones. It's certainly not an eyesore.. I don't know too much about sofa costs but I'd estimate it was a bundle when it was first bought.
post #24 of 78
Certain Ikea items are very durable and will serve your purposes very well. Like the Billy bookshelf. And the classic items can be expanded or rebuilt twenty years later without any hassle finding somewhere to buy the extra pieces. They still make them. I wouldn't buy a sofa or a chair though.
post #25 of 78
There are some really nice vintage Scandinavian design furniture from the '60s--certainly doesn't look like anything from Ikea.
post #26 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
furniture for the fascist in you?
Fendi also has a Casa line.
post #27 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Fendi also has a Casa line.
Is it also fascistic in style? Armani's overuse of wood, stone and leather in square shapes looks like a rip-off of Italian Fascist Architecture to me. A lot of people like that look, but it is very offputting in my eyes.
post #28 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Is it also fascistic in style?

Armani's overuse of wood, stone and leather in square shapes looks like a rip-off of Italian Fascist Architecture to me. A lot of people like that look, but it is very offputting in my eyes.
It is for the oligarch in you:

post #29 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
My apartment is furnished by a combination of hand-me-downs, cheap IKEA stuff (most bought off Craigs list for ridiculously cheap), thrift store and consignment store buys and a couple milk crates from the dumpster area of Ralphs.
My first apartment was furnished with ikea pieces, either bought or brought over from my wife's former apartment. I still have a few ikea pieces in my current apartment, like billy bookshelves I have put in the corridor or some heavy duty (Ivar I think) shelves I have put in my storage room.
And all my kitchen is ikea, but it wasn't really cheap.

!luc
post #30 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Ikea is the Armani Collezioni of the furniture world.

More like the H&M of the furniture world, I'd say. Cheap, trendy and disposable.
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