or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Travel log
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Travel log - Page 3

post #31 of 127
Thread Starter 
In case its not already obvious,
I like Prague, a lot. I like it because it has style, in big ways and small. It the way it is organized, in its architectural renditions and in the organic rhythms it emits.

I just had my morning cappuccino in a very fashionable coffee shop, that was playing some very hip, albeit subdued Czech music. In most places you hear American music, but this place obviously likes the home grown stuff, and so did I.

I then ventured down a sidestreet and came upon a whole slew of upscale boutiques, including one for men displaying an elegant navy beadstripe Canali suit and appropriate accessories. The same street also housed a Dunhill, an elegant "American Cafe" -- with
a nice warm mint green exterior -- and the local Louis Vuitton shop. These people get it.
post #32 of 127
There's a small cafe on the east side of the Manesuv bridge (the bridge just north of the Charles) with tables along the railing of the river. Great place to be if they're open during the winter.
post #33 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini


Is that, an ice cream sunday?
post #34 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by LARon
The same street also housed a Dunhill, an elegant "American Cafe" -- with
a nice warm mint green exterior -- and the local Louis Vuitton shop. These people get it.


I also agree, warm green mint exteriors and Louis Vuitton, these are the signs of some place special.
post #35 of 127
Thread Starter 
Great view, that. Too cold for ice cream, though (although I did eat on the roof of the Hotel Prince the night I arrived).
post #36 of 127
Heh...I've had coffee on the same terrace, I think. You should see the Reduta Jazz Club - it's not far from the Charles bridge. It may have become a bit touristy now, after the Bill Clinton/Vaclav Havel "Two Presidents' Jam" but still has tremendous charm.
post #37 of 127
I am enjoying the log, please keep it up.

With regard to your negative impressions of the Rijksmuseum, the museum itself is almost entirely closed for remodeling due to asbestos problems. What you saw was only a temporary exhibition space where they are displaying a small collection of their "masterpieces" (Rembrandt, Vermeer, etc.).

I have not been to Amsterdam in about a year, but I hear that the red light district is not what it used to be - apparently the government has cracked down on the area and closed a large number of the windows.
post #38 of 127
I too, am enjoying the log. Glad you're having a good trip LARon, and keep up the reportage. I'm looking forward to envying your Vass souvenirs after you return, as well.
post #39 of 127
Thank you Ron, I thoroughly enjoyed all your entries. Keep them coming. But I have to say "this thread worths nothing without pictures."
post #40 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryce330
I am enjoying the log, please keep it up.

With regard to your negative impressions of the Rijksmuseum, the museum itself is almost entirely closed for remodeling due to asbestos problems. What you saw was only a temporary exhibition space where they are displaying a small collection of their "masterpieces" (Rembrandt, Vermeer, etc.).

I have not been to Amsterdam in about a year, but I hear that the red light district is not what it used to be - apparently the government has cracked down on the area and closed a large number of the windows.

Interesting: well yes, w/respect to the Rijksmuseum, that would make sense. I was awed by the exterior -- and even took a photo -- only to then wslk into what was obviously a much smaller space. Odd, though, I didn't notice any scaffolding or other signs of obvious renovation. Thanks for pointing that out.

As for the red light district, I found on my walk home the last night that there are "windows" in other parts of town as well. I passed about 10 windows along some random canal in what appeared to be a non-tourist neighborhood.

Thanks for following along.
post #41 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mussel
Thank you Ron, I thoroughly enjoyed all your entries. Keep them coming. But I have to say "this thread worths nothing without pictures."

I have plenty, which I'll try and post upon return -- including one special one that I'll share as a PM with the bros who don't have objections (if you've dropped in on the other thread you'll know what I'm talking about).

Thanks, guys, its good to know there's an audience. I let half a day go by because I was a bit surprised by the initial questioning of a few posts, and thought the better part of valor should prevail. Now that I know others are interested, I'll recapture that period and submit an update.

For the moment, though, I've gotta pack and czech out; on to Boedapest (Czech spelling).
Enjoy.
post #42 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Heh...I've had coffee on the same terrace, I think. You should see the Reduta Jazz Club - it's not far from the Charles bridge. It may have become a bit touristy now, after the Bill Clinton/Vaclav Havel "Two Presidents' Jam" but still has tremendous charm.
That cafe will forever be engrained in my memory. Previous to my first trip there, I was told by several people that Prague was one of the lesser diverse cities in Europe as it was resistant to outside influences during Communism. I found this to be true for the most part until the second or third day that I stumbled upon the cafe with a few tourists, dressed up waiters, and the soft sounds of jazz greats such as Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, and Duke Ellington emanating from their nearby kitchen. It was like entering a time machine that lasted a few espressos and a couple of pages of my moleskin.
post #43 of 127
Thread Starter 
Returning briefly to the subject of the medieval, a subject they actually exploit and commercialize here, and for good reason: they have a very popular torture chamber in Prague castle. Being in Eastern Europe, Prague has a long history of knighthood and warfare (something at which they've not really excelled, nevertheless, they have the weaponry).

Prague castle itself is the largest castle in Europe, a beautiful (if drafty) structure with glorious stain glass windows on which construction began in the 14th century and wasn't completed until the early 20th century. As my tour guide pointed out, the facade contains two elements that clearly mark it as a modern building (at least the completion), despite its neolithic appearance: the head of an American Indian -- in full head dress -- and busts of the two lead architects, in modern business suits!!! Its quite comical, if you catch it; you have all these images of saints, holy men and kings then two guys in suits and a native American. Unbelievable.

On the grounds of the castle, in addition to the torture chamber -- with some wicked armament -- are a number of lesser palaces, home in times past to noble families, the temporary residence of Franz Kafka -- he lived in one of a corridor of small shacks built into one of the rear rampart walls -- and a Barbie museum containing over 1,000 dolls. Go figure!

On leaving the world of torture chambers, neolithic architects wearing Armani and the Barbie museum, I walked back across the nearest bridge into the Jewish quarter, a small community in the Old Quarter. Its hard to imagine people being relegated to a relatively small area, which the Jewish Quarter is, but they did well with what they had.

I stopped and had a real -- and my only -- genuine Czech meal at a little place called Svejk, which the menu described as representing the unglamorous Everyman of the Czech Republic. Had Bratwurst in beer sauce, goulash w/dumplings and a big mug 'o Pilsner. I passed on the pork knuckles; having once eating a knuckle sandwich, I'm trying to mind my knuckle intake (also helps preserve my dental investment).
post #44 of 127
Thread Starter 
My trip to the airport was as efficient and enjoyable as the rest of my experiences here. In conversations with my tour guide and taxi driver I learned that they really have welcomed and embraced capitalism with great gusto since '89, and it shows.

Prague is a very fashionable, efficient and well organized city. My only regret, if any, is that I didn't have another chance to sample their food (the first night I ate at a fancy hotel for the view; the second night my "date" wanted sushi, and I was only too happy to oblige -- she returned the favor, several times over; and last night I had pasta. There are a lot of Italian and Argentinian restaurants in town, and quite a few French as well. I ate breakfast in my hotel each morning).

But, that's OK, this was a journey of discovery; I'll definitely be back. Seat up, tray table locked and stowed . . . Up and away.
post #45 of 127
LARon,

Have a safe flight! Great job on these reports; much appreciated!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › Travel log