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Dry Cleaning 3-Roll-2 jackets?

post #1 of 82
Thread Starter 
A few years back, Patrick Chu of W.W. Chan decided that the three-roll-two was a better look for me. As a result, four of my Chan jackets are 3-roll-2, and four of my five Chan suits have this configuration.

I never gave the matter too much thought until I got a grease spot on my newest suit from Chan (on the second wearing, dammit!). When I took it to the dry cleaners, I told them to pay attention to the 3-roll-2 lapel configuration. It seems that they don't do their dry cleaning on-site, and I was advised that the cleaners would press the lapels only down to the top button, thereby ruining the 3-roll-2 configuration. I took the suit coat and tried spot cleaning it. I am pleased to say that repeated applications of corn starch, the most efficacious treatment, eliminated the grease spot.

However, what if someone spills a tureen of soup on my suit? (This actually happened to me once at Balliol.) Are there cleaners who can do a good job on a 3-roll-2 and not spoil the configuration by inept pressing? In particular, are there any such cleaners in the Greater Los Angeles Area--preferably in or near Long Beach?
post #2 of 82
I send all my stuff to RAVE Fabricare in Arizona.

They do a great job.
post #3 of 82
If you don't want to engage in interstate dry cleaning, I've had good luck asking to have the lapels pressed open. Much livelier roll that way -- no crease.
post #4 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

If you don't want to engage in interstate dry cleaning, I've had good luck asking to have the lapels pressed open. Much livelier roll that way -- no crease.

Could you clarify this a bit, please? I'm not exactly sure what is meant.
post #5 of 82
Rave has a great reputation. Will uses them. To find a better dry cleaner in your area,
you might check with a high end local men's store like Carroll &Co, Nieman's or
Barneys. If you have a really good alterations tailor, he/she might be good for a referral.
That's how I found mine.
post #6 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

Rave has a great reputation. Will uses them. To find a better dry cleaner in your area,
you might check with a high end local men's store like Carroll &Co, Nieman's or
Barneys. If you have a really good alterations tailor, he/she might be good for a referral.
That's how I found mine.

Would you mind letting me know which cleaner that is? I went to some "Green" place and they shrunk my damned collar on my jacket. Unbelievable. And they had gotten ridiculously positive reviews on Yelp too!
post #7 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

I send all my stuff to RAVE Fabricare in Arizona.
They do a great job.

+1

Non-billionaires might not be able to afford sending everything to RAVE every time, but for suits and jackets, the added expense is worth the peace of mind. Your garment will come back spotless, professionally pressed, and often seemingly in better condition than it was upon being shipped to them in the first place.

Contrast this with just about any neighborhood dry cleaner in the United States, in which you stand a roughly 50/50 chance of having a suit machine-pressed into unrecognizable shape. It's cheaper, but is saving a few bucks worth a complete dice roll on the longevity of your item?
post #8 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post


+1
Non-billionaires might not be able to afford sending everything to RAVE every time, but for suits and jackets, the added expense is worth the peace of mind. Your garment will come back spotless, professionally pressed, and often seemingly in better condition than it was upon being shipped to them in the first place.
Contrast this with just about any neighborhood dry cleaner in the United States, in which you stand a roughly 50/50 chance of having a suit machine-pressed into unrecognizable shape. It's cheaper, but is saving a few bucks worth a complete dice roll on the longevity of your item?

How do they package it up on return? I assume in some way that it doesn't end up wrinkled while in-transit?

post #9 of 82
For the Rave bespoke service, the jackets come back on wide hangers hung within individual tombstone boxes, stuffed carefully with acid free tissue so that their excellent ironwork is completely undisturbed. They will photograph items on arrival do that there is a reference for the pressing staff.

The quality of the ironwork is no less than from a tailor. It's entirely above the standard of a dry cleaner. I can't imagine settling for less than this for bespoke clothes, and cross country is still easier than cross-Atlantic, which is what I used to do.

The last delivery that I got was about an eight foot high stack of such boxes. I'll post a photograph when I get around to do a review.
post #10 of 82
A little off point but if only a pressing is needed and not cleaning, I've used a local alterations tailor. He presses by hand and understands what I am looking for. I found it a good compromise between sending the suit to Arizona. Being new to bespoke, though, I will heed the advice to stay away from local drycleaners and send to Rave.

Rob
post #11 of 82
As stated by comrade, Will uses Rave. Here's something he wrote on the subject of cleaning 3-roll-2 jackets.
post #12 of 82
When I was in San Diego for a year, I used Margret's Cleaners (based on Esquire's list of "Best of San Diego") for a tie that had gotten a grease stain the very first time I wore it. I was very apprehensive, since most cleaners tend to press ties flat, but my tie came back looking perfect. I'm virtually certain they have a shop in the LA area. I haven't tried them for a 3-roll-2 jacket, but you might pay them a visit and speak to them.
post #13 of 82
By and large, the answer to the question, "Soiled tie?" is "New tie." Neckties are like socks and underwear: please replace regularly. I realize there is almost totemic worship of neckties by many SF members...but even the finest such tie is an expendable item.

So many guys on SF are oriented only to the cost of acquisition rather than the more general ongoing cost of trying to be well-dressed. That cost includes (a) care and (b) replacement.

Can anyone guess the funniest tie rehabilitation story in StyFo history?
post #14 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by F. Corbera View Post

By and large, the answer to the question, "Soiled tie?" is "New tie." Neckties are like socks and underwear: please replace regularly. I realize there is almost totemic worship of neckties by many SF members...but even the finest such tie is an expendable item.
So many guys on SF are oriented only to the cost of acquisition rather than the more general ongoing cost of trying to be well-dressed. That cost includes (a) care and (b) replacement.
Can anyone guess the funniest tie rehabilitation story in StyFo history?

I vehemently disagree with your socks and underwear comment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iroh View Post

Iroh's Guides: How To Repair Your Socks. You will need: A sock with a hole A Serger (Note: I ran out of socks with holes before I decided to make this thread, so no pics for the first two steps until I wear though some more) I always enjoy modding and repairing my clothes. I am here to share some of my knowledge with you. Here is a guide on how to repair your socks: Before: Imagine a sock if a hole in it. During: Imagine a sock being repaired with a serger. After: 004ruy.jpg005iqq.jpg Wearing: 006jn.jpg Conclusion: Most of my socks wear down at the back of the heels first, now they can be repaired. The material will stretch and the bite out of the sock won't be noticeable when being worn. Questions & Comments Welcome. Iroh
post #15 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

I vehemently disagree with your socks and underwear comment.

I regret that placing both Reevolving and iroh under my protection has had a calming effect on their posts.

Perhaps I was wrong to do so.
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